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Sediment grain size parameters

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  • This report pertains to samples collected for the UK Department of Trade and Industry (now Department of Energy and Climate Change) as part of Strategic Environmental Assessment SEA1 (White Zone) from west of the Shetland Islands by Geotek Ltd from the RRS Charles Darwin during the summer of 2000. This report is the product of statistical analyses on grain size data of 109 seabed samples.

  • This report is the product of the laboratory analyses carried out on sediments collected on the MV Kommandor Jack during the summer or 2001 as part of Department of Trade and Industry's (now Department of Energy and Climate Change) Strategic Environmental Assessment SEA2. The results of the analyses include tables and curves from the samples collected from the southern North Sea, the associated distribution curves, results of the analyses of the fine-grained samples collected from the northern North Sea, and the results of the Loss on Ignition analysis. An Excel data file is also available.

  • As part of the Department of Trade and Industry's (now Department of Energy and Climate Change) Strategic Environmental Assessment SEA7 an environmental survey was carried out from the SV Kommandor Jack. The aim of the survey was to acquire seabed samples for biological, physical and chemical analysis together with video and digital stills photography to ground truth the geophysical data and enable a general characterisation of seafloor habitats and community types present within the SEA7 area. The area sampled included Anton Dohrn Seamount, Rockall Bank, Hatton Bank, George Bligh Bank and Rosemary Bank. This report provides a log of the field sampling work undertaken for SEA7, in particular the biological, physical and chemical sampling.

  • This report is a contribution to the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA4) conducted by the Department of Trade and Industry (now Department of Energy and Climate Change). The report is a summary of published data and interpretations describes the surficial seabed geology and geological processes affecting the continental shelf part of the SEA4 area, lying in water depths of less than 200 m. Roughly half of the SEA4 area lies in these water depths. The report reviews the seabed geomorphology, near-bottom currents, types of rock outcrop, variations in the texture of the unconsolidated sediments, the variety and distributions of seabed bedforms and selected aspects of the inorganic geochemistry of the sediments. Variations in the seabed geology have a major influence on the organisms that live on the bottom, thus are important to understanding the modern seabed habitat. The modern seabed environment now largely reflects the effects of reworking by near-bottom currents on the topography and the sediments that originated during the glaciations.

  • As part of the Department of Trade and Industry's (now Department of Energy and Climate Change) 1999 Strategic Environmental Assessment SEA1 (White Zone) Environmental Survey: Seabed survey of the deep-waters to the north and west of Scotland. The aims were to : Complete TOBI sidescan sonar survey of the "White Zone" begun on RRS Charles Darwin cruise 119C leg A; To carry out photographic surveys of the "White Zone" to ground truth the sidescan sonar imagery and provide an assessment of the seabed fauna; To carry out seabed sampling to further ground truth the sidescan sonar imagery and generate samples for the future analysis of selected environmental parameters (hydrocarbons, elements, particle size). 39 samples were collected. Raw TOBI Bathymetry - includes sidescan sonar, sub-bottom profiler and magnetometer data and Mosaiced TOBI sidescan imagery are available. The survey report is also available. The preliminary report describes the data collection and interpretation carried out by Southampton Oceanography Centre in the summer of 1999 on behalf of the DTI. The areas surveyed were in unlicensed parts of the UKCS NW of Scotland, and the purpose of the work was to obtain regional environmental information. The work was carried out in two survey legs, Leg A was a regional side-scan sonar survey, whilst leg B was a seafloor survey of targets selected from the results of leg 1. This report is presented in 4 sections: Section 1 - Cruise report for Leg A; Section 2 - Cruise report for Leg B; Section 3 - Regional environmental interpretation from side-scan sonar and camera data; Section 4 - Initial environmental assessment.

  • As part of the Department of Trade and Industry's (now Department of Energy and Climate Change) Strategic Environmental Assessment project for Area 4 (SEA4) an environmental survey was carried out from the R/V Kommandor Jack. The aim of the survey was to acquire information about specific aspects of the environment and its sea floor habitats of the Faroe Shetland Channel by describing the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the area. Seabed sampling, video and still photography were carried out during the survey. A total of 79 sites were sampled for biological and chemical analyses, of which 76 sites were also sampled for geological analysis. (138 samples were collected). A Physical/chemical sampling quality assurance report and a BGS report which includes details of geological and geotechnical analyses carried out on board ship.

  • This report is a contribution to the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA5) conducted by the Department of Trade and Industry (now Department of Energy and Climate Change). This report reviews published and newly-acquired seabed geological data in an area of 78,000 square kilometres extending from the coast to more than 200 m water depth to the east of the British Isles. While it can be argued that the modern environment is a product of past environmental conditions, the basis for the review is also that our understanding of the modern environment can be significantly improved if new techniques, data and ideas are applied to a revision of the existing research knowledge. The purpose of the review is to place the characteristics of the seabed features that were surveyed by the DTI in 2003, and the processes forming them, into an improved understanding of their historical, local and regional context. In this way a strong element of the review is to include the results from exploration and discovery. The survey data included multibeam, sidescan sonar, seismic-reflection profiles, sea floor photographs and samples.

  • Seabed sampling with video and digital stills photography; Moray Firth, Southern Trench, Sandy Riddle, Pobie Bank, Braer Study Area, Fair Isle, Papa and Turbot Banks, Smith Bank and JONSIS Transect. This report forms the second of two reports relating to 2 research cruises undertaken on behalf of the Department of Trade and Industry (now Department of Energy and Climate Change) during the Strategic Environmental Assessment 5 (SEA5). Data were collected by the RV Kommandor Jack during the period September 17th - October, 8th, 2003. The report describes the collection of a variety of benthic sediment samples for the analysis of particle size, hydrocarbon and heavy metal content, and benthic fauna composition. These were collected in order to enable groundtruthing and interpretation of the various geophysical data-sets collected during the first cruise. In addition, marine video surveying techniques were used to photograph parts of the seabed.

  • This report is a contribution to the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA4) conducted by the Department of Trade and Industry (now Department of Energy and Climate Change). The report describes the surficial sediments in the SEA4 area and the sedimentary processes that are active in the area at the present day. The report focuses on the deeper water areas from the outer continental shelf to the floor of the Norwegian Basin in the northernmost part of SEA4. The report is based on sidescan sonar images, multibeam bathymetry, sub-bottom profiles, seabed photographs and sediment samples. The Holocene and late glacial events and processes that contributed to the present day seafloor morphology and sediment distribution are reviewed, as is the present day oceanographic regime. It is concluded that the present day sedimentary environment, seaward of the continental shelf edge at about 200 m water depth, is dominated by low sediment input and deposition rates, and by reworking of surficial sediments by bottom currents. The large scale seabed morphology was shaped mainly during the last glacial, when high sediment input resulted in glacigenic debris fan formation.

  • As part of the Department of Trade and Industry's (now Department of Energy and Climate Change) Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA7) a regional seafloor environmental survey was undertaken in the Faroe Shetland Channel off the north and west coasts of Shetland. The work included bathymetric surveys, sediment sampling for biological and chemical analysis, and seabed photography. 7 video files and 507 photographs are available. Raw multibeam data are available. A cruise report is also available.