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Nitrogen

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  • These datasets provide Concentration Based Estimated Deposition (CBED) values of sulphur and nitrogen atmospheric deposition for 5x5 kilometres (km) grid squares of the UK averaged over the years 2017 to 2019. The data consist of deposition values for sulphur, oxidised nitrogen and reduced nitrogen, and base cations. Total deposition is the sum of four components calculated separately: wet deposition, dry deposition of gases, dry deposition of particulate matter and cloud droplet deposition. Habitat-specific data are provided for (i) moorland/short vegetation everywhere, and (ii) forest everywhere. Additionally, the grid square average over multiple land cover types (i.e. arable, grassland, forest, moorland, urban) is also calculated. The habitat-specific data are recommended for use with critical loads for the calculation of critical load exceedances. The work in generating and compiling the dataset has been funded by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) and various Departments for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra) contracts. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1efa692d-76ca-406e-8736-837a457e16ee

  • Gridded model estimates of nitrate-N stored in the vadose (unsaturated) zone. This dataset presents annual gridded estimates of nitrate stored in the vadose zone for 1900 - 2000 on a 0.5 degree grid (units: kg N/grid cell). Data are supplied as a single netCDF for all years. This data was derived by Ascott et al. (2017). Global models of depth to groundwater table, subsurface porosity and groundwater recharge were used to derive estimates of nitrate travel time in the vadose zone. The travel time was combined with annual estimates of nitrate leaching from the base of the soil zone for 1900 - 2000 to estimate total nitrate stored in the vadose zone. For full details of the dataset derivation, please refer to Ascott et al. (2017). Ascott, M.J., Gooddy, D.C., Wang, L., Stuart, M.E., Lewis, M.A., Ward, R.S. and Binley, A.M. (2017) Global patterns of nitrate storage in the vadose zone. Nature Communications 8(1), 1416.

  • This dataset provides values of sulphur and nitrogen deposition, deposition of non-marine base cations and concentration values for ammonia (NH3), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) on the UK nature conservation protected sites, averaged over the years 2017 to 2019. The dataset also includes calculated minimum, maximum and gridded average values for each site. Protected nature sites covered are: (i) Special Areas of Conservation (SAC) (ii) Special Protection Areas (SPA) (iii) Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). The data consist of values of nitrogen and acid deposition, non-marine base cation deposition, and concentrations of ammonia (NH3) based on the Concentration Based Estimated Deposition (CBED), and concentrations of NOx and SO2 using the Pollution Climate Mapping (PCM) model. Nitrogen and acid deposition data is also given for specific habitat types including: (i) moorland/short vegetation everywhere, (ii) forest everywhere, and (iii) the grid square average over multiple land cover types (i.e. arable, grassland, forest, moorland, urban) These habitat-specific data are recommended for use with critical loads for the calculation of critical load exceedances using the relevant deposition/habitat type. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/65ab44a0-58bd-43ab-a3bc-a850ddd9a0f1

  • This dataset contains potential activities of soil extra cellular enzyme measured from soil samples from the Phosphorus Limitation And ecosystem responses to Carbon dioxide Enrichment (PLACE). The enzyme activities measured are 1,4-β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, N-acetyl β-D-glucosaminidase, leucine aminopeptidase, and acid phosphatase. Soil samples were collected in Autumn 2018 and analysed in the laboratory at Wageningen University. The experimental design uses 35 cm x 35 cm turf mesocosms from a long term nutrient manipulation experiment. The original experiment is based at Wardlow Hay Cop in the Peak District, UK. Two adjacent P-limited grass lands on a limestone/ calcareous soil and an acidic soil have had nutrient manipulated for > 20 years. In 2018 these mesocosms were exposed to either ambient CO2 (ca. 410 ppm) or 600 ppm. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5e944db2-305f-4f15-87b4-5110224ac90d

  • This dataset contains total nitrogen (N) deposition at a 1km x 1km resolution in the UK, annually from 1990 to 2017. N deposition is presented as reduced N (NHx) and oxidised N (NOy), both of which are split into wet and dry portions. Values are given for forest and moorland land cover, as well as a weighted mean to each grid cell (‘grid average’). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9b203324-6b37-4e91-b028-e073b197fb9f

  • Topsoil nutrient data - total nitrogen (N) concentration (%), C:N ratio and Olsen-Phosphorus (mg/kg). Data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth. Cores from 256 1km x 1km squares across Great Britain were analysed in 2007. For total N concentration (and therefore C:N ratio), a total of 1024 cores were analysed, and for Olsen-P, a total of 1054 cores were analysed. See Emmett et al. 2010 for further details of sampling and methods (http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/5201/1/CS_UK_2007_TR3%5B1%5D.pdf). Estimates of mean values within selected habitats and parent material characteristics across GB were made using Countryside Survey (CS) data from 1978, 1998 and 2007 using a mixed model approach. The estimated means of habitat/parent material combinations are modelled on dominant habitat and parent material characteristics derived from the Land Cover Map 2007 and Parent Material Model 2009, respectively. The parent material characteristic used was that which minimised AIC in each model (see Dataset Documentation). Please see Scott, 2008 for further details of similar statistical analysis (http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/5202/1/CS_UK_2007_TR4%5B1%5D.pdf). Areas, such as urban and littoral rock, are not sampled by CS and therefore have no associated data. Also, in some circumstances sample sizes for particular habitat / parent material combinations were insufficient to estimate mean values. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7055965b-7fe5-442b-902d-63193cbe001c

  • The data consist of soil physicochemical and biological data for three soil depths (0-15, 15-30 and 30-60 cm) from a three-cut silage plot trial located at three grassland sites within the UK collected between April 2016 and October 2016. The sites were Rothamsted Research at North Wyke in Devon, Bangor University at Henfaes Research Station in North Wales, and Easter Bush in Scotland. At each site measurements were taken from sixteen plots, organised within a randomised complete block design: four (control) plots did not receive fertilizer, four plots received urea only, four plots received urea and urea-inhibitors, and four plots received ammonium-nitrate (Nitram). Fertiliser was applied three times and three cuts were performed. All parameters were measured following fertiliser application. Samples were taken before fertilizer additions at peak growth and before the last silage cut. Soil physical parameters were: aggregate size distribution, aggregate stability, texture (sand/silt/clay) and soil moisture. Soil chemical parameters were: soil nitrate and ammonium, dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen, amino acids and peptides, soil organic matter content as loss-on-ignition, pH, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, permanganate oxdisable carbon, citric acid extractable phosphorous, Olsen-P and total carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. Soil biological measures were: microbial biomass, carbon and nitrogen. Microbial community composition and nitrogen genes were measured on the same soil samples and are presented in a separate dataset (https://doi.org/10.5285/59f81d41-a789-4c5c-8ab8-36baa7ac2c55) Measurements were undertaken by members of staff from the Centre of Ecology & Hydrology (Bangor, Edinburgh, Lancaster, Wallingford), Bangor University, School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography and Rothamsted Research, Sustainable Agricultural Sciences, North Wyke. Data was collected for the Newton Fund project "UK-China Virtual Joint Centre for Improved Nitrogen Agronomy". Funded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and NERC - Ref BB/N013468/1 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7a87dde4-b54e-49b0-8751-1d59e8aebb90

  • This dataset presents modelled estimates of soil nitrogen concentration (% dry weight soil) at 1km2 resolution across Great Britain. A Generalized Additive Model approach was used with Countryside Survey soil nitrogen data from 2007 and including climate, atmospheric deposition, habitat, soil and spatial predictors. The model is based on soil nitrogen data from 913 locations across Great Britain and is representative of 0-15 cm soil depth. Soil N concentration was determined using a total elemental analyser. The Countryside Survey looks at a range of physical, chemical and biological properties of the topsoil from a representative sample of habitats across the UK. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8ec2d5ae-5d19-4b58-8cf6-aafdad485bb2

  • We investigated the physical basis of this weakened trapping using pore scale observations of supercritical CO2 in mixed-wet carbonates. The wetting alteration induced by oil provided CO2-wet surfaces that served as conduits to flow. In situ measurements of contact angles showed that CO2 varied from nonwetting to wetting throughout the pore space, with contact angles ranging 25° <θ< 127°; in contrast, an inert gas, N2, was nonwetting with a smaller range of contact angle 24° <θ< 68 °. Observations of trapped ganglia morphology showed that this wettability allowed CO2 to create large, connected, ganglia by inhabiting small pores in mixed-wet rocks. The connected ganglia persisted after three pore volumes of brine injection, facilitating the desaturation that leads to decreased trapping relative to water-wet systems. This data is associated with this open access publication: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2016, 50, 18, 10282-10290. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.6b03111.

  • The dataset contains geochemical measurements which quantify the amount and source of carbon in organic matter of sediments from Lake Paringa, New Zealand. Measurements were made on a 6 m sediment core collected in 2015 from the lake bed using a Mackereth corer (PA6m1a). The core was correlated to master core PA1 which has a well-established age-depth model based on accelerator mass spectrometry measurements of the radiocarbon (14C) content of terrestrial macrofossils (Howarth et al., 2016). In addition, soil samples were collected using a soil auger from two elevation transects in westland, New Zealand in 2016 and 2017 (from Mt. Fox and Alex Knob). All sediment samples were freeze dried and ground to homogenise them prior to geochemical analyses. Organic carbon concentration (%) and the stable isotopic composition of organic carbon (δ13C) was measured (Frith et al., 2018) following the removal of carbonate minerals (0.25 M hydrochloric acid for 4 hours at approximately 70 °C) by combustion of sediment at 1,020 °C in a Costech Elemental Analyser coupled via a CONFLO III to a Thermo Scientific Delta V Advantage stable isotope mass spectrometer. Total nitrogen content (N, %) and its isotopic composition (δ15N) was measured by combustion of untreated samples in a Costech Elemental Analyser with a CARBOSORB trap to inhibit large CO2 peaks from affecting measurements. A subset of samples were selected for analysis of the radiocarbon activity (14C, reported as F14C) of bulk organic matter by accelerator mass spectrometry after graphitization. A subset of sediment samples from the lake core and soil samples were selected for the analysis of biomarker abundance and their hydrogen isotope composition. We focused on the extraction of n-alkanes from aliquots of lake sediment (~2 g) using established methods (Wang et al., 2020). These measurements are reported in the dataset as the abundance of n-alkanes (chain lengths C21 to C35) in ug/g of sediment (and sum of chain lengths and ratios - carbon preference index). Finally, the dataset includes outputs of organic matter provenance: modelled elevation and depth, as described in Wang et al., (2020). In the datafile, the sample elevation and depth are provided. The labels for data are as follows. For down core sediment samples from Lake Paringa, they are labelled with the core code (PA6m1), and the sampling interval in centimetres (PA6m1_x). Soil samples from an elevation transect from Mt Fox (MF-YY-a) are labelled with a distinct code for each site (YY) and sub-code for each soil depth (a). Soil samples from an elevation transect of Alex Knob (5.Z.z) are labelled based on sub-site (Z) and soil depth (z).