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ESRI shapefile

16 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 16
  • Elevation contour lines within the Severn catchment at 10 metre intervals. Digitised from the scanned topographic maps.

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for linear features across Great Britain in 1984 in a vector format. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from 384 1km squares surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project, then scaling up to a national level. The data are presented as mean lengths per 1km square for seven different feature categories within 45 different land class types, based on the ITE Land Classification. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/362bff26-d2ca-4700-b1f0-22072f4bc0cc

  • Spot heights (elevation values in metres) for areas within the Plynlimon catchments; digitised from scanned topographic maps of Plynlimon Catchment Areas.

  • Elevation contour lines within the Wye catchment at 10 and 20 metre intervals. The contour lines have been digitised from a scanned topographic map.

  • This dataset consists of change data for areas of Broad Habitats across Great Britain between 1998 and 2007. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from up to 591 1km squares and scaling up to a national level. The data are summarized as percentage increase or decrease in habitat area per Land Class (areas of similar environmental characteristics) and are in a vector format. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB and using the 'ITE Land Classification' as a method of stratification. The data were collected as part of Countryside Survey, a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The Survey has been carried out at regular intervals since 1978 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. In addition to habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d83a0f9e-00c9-4d2d-9d0a-e92a16dcb334

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for linear features across Great Britain in 1990 in a vector format. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from 508 1km squares surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project, then scaling up to a national level. The data are presented as mean lengths per 1km square for seven different feature categories within 45 different land class types, based on the ITE Land Classification. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ce514508-bd25-403e-bb35-42001e3c2b25

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for linear features across Great Britain in 2007 in a vector format. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from 591 1km squares surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project, then scaling up to a national level. The data are presented as mean lengths per 1km square for seven different feature categories within 45 different Land Class types, based on the ITE Land Classification. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/fc65177d-b113-420e-a70b-05d3f42682d5

  • Estimates of in-river concentrations (mg/l) and loads (kg/day) of nutrients to rivers in England and Wales from multiple sector sources, modelled with SAGIS (Source Apportionment GIS). The nutrients include nitrate (mg/l N) and ortho-phosphate (mg/l P); the estimate loads are expressed as kilograms per day (kg/day) and the in-river concentrations as milligrams per litre (mg/l). Sources are both diffuse and point. Diffuse sources include livestock farming, arable farming, highways, urban runoff, background (from soils), onsite wastewater treatment systems and atmospheric deposition. Point sources include treated wastewater effluent, combined sewer overflows and storm tanks, industrial discharges and mine water discharges. Concentrations and loads are modelled using the Environment Agency's catchment river model, SIMCAT, at the locations of model features or every 1 km along each river, taking into account all upstream sources and user defined river losses. SAGIS is a modelling framework was developed through the UK Water Industry Research Programme (UKWIR) project 'Chemical Source Apportionment under the WFD' [1], with support from the Environment Agency and SEPA. The model is also described in [2] [1] UKWIR (2012) Chemical Source Apportionment under the WFD (12/WW/02/3). Final report for UK Water Industry Research, 1 Queen Annes Gate, London, ISBN: 1 84057 637 5. [2] Comber, S.D.; Smith, R.; Daldorph, P.; Gardner, M.J.; Constantino, C.; Ellor, B. (2013) Development of a Chemical Source Apportionment Decision Support Framework for Catchment Management. Environ. Sci. Technol. 47, 9824-9832 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8c5d9e38-0244-4a39-8600-a85513a6fecf

  • The Land Classification of Shetland is a classification of the Shetland Isles into a set of 16 environmental strata, termed land classes, to be used as a basis for ecological survey, originally developed by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (ITE) in 1974. The strata were created from the multivariate analysis of 150 environmental variables, including topographic data, geographical features and geology data. The Land Classification can be used to stratify a wide range of ecological and biogeographical surveys to improve the efficiency of collection, analysis and presentation of information derived from a sample. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f1b3179e-b446-473d-a5fb-4166668da146

  • The 5km Hex GS Running Sand dataset shows a generalised view of the GeoSure Running Sand v8 dataset to a hexagonal grid resolution of 64.95km coverage area (side length of 5km). This dataset indicates areas of potential ground movement in a helpful and user-friendly format. The rating is based on a highest level of susceptibility identified within that Hex area: Low (1), Moderate (2), Significant (3). Areas of localised significant rating are also indicated. The summarising process via spatial statistics at this scale may lead to under or over estimation of the extent of a hazard. The supporting GeoSure reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Running Sand methodology is based on the BGS Digital Map (DiGMapGB-50) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to show running sand behaviour under the action of flowing water, a characteristic usually of saturated sand and silt grade material. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available.