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    Data from this project is a UK contribution to a US research cruise that aimed to examine the impact of wave breaking and bubble processes on air-sea gas exchange. Measurements were made of whitecap fraction, wave state, wave bubble statistics and bubble properties beneath breaking waves on the R/V Knorr KN213-3 cruise departing Nuuk, Greenland October 9, 2013 arriving at Woods Hole, USA on November 12, 2013. Instruments and platforms used included an 11 meter long free-floating spar buoy equipped with wave wires, a bubble camera, acoustic resonators, a Waverider buoy and ship measurements of aerosol fluxes. Data generation were funded by NERC parent grant NE/J020893/1 awarded to Professor Ian Brooks and associated child grants NE/J020540/1 and NE/J022373/2 awarded to Mr Robin Pascal and Dr Helen Czerski respectively.

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    The Monterey Bay Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE) collected physical oceanographic data in the Monterey Canyon study area, off the coast of Central California over an 18 month period between October 2015 and April 2017. This project was a long term effort to monitor turbidity currents using a variety of new instruments and technologies to assess movement of water and sediment, assess evolution and shape of the sea floor and monitor physical processes within flows at various spatial scales. Measurements were taken using an array of instruments which include: moorings; sediment traps, Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP); transmissometers; vertical profilers; Benthic Instrument Nodes (BIN); Sediment Transport Event Detectors (STEDs); Benthic Event Detectors (BEDs); Autonomous Monitoring Transponder (AMT); wave sensors, autonomous underwater vehicles and wave gliders. The Monterey Bay Coordinated Canyon Experiment project was led by Monterey Bay Aquarium Institute (MBARI) in collaboration with researchers from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), Ocean University of China (OUC), National Oceanography Centre (NOC) Southampton and University of Hull, UK. MBARI are responsible for the long term data management of all datasets generated by the project. Datasets are hosted at the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS), a full data report is available from https://www.mbari.org/science/seafloor-processes/geological-changes/coordinated-canyon-experiment-datareport-main-page/.

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    This dataset consists of measurements of wave height, direction and frequency, bubble size distribution, Autoflux measurements of air-sea fluxes CO2, and WAVEX measurements of directional wave radar. Data were collected onboard the RRS James Clark Ross in the Weddell Sea during cruises in the 2010/2011, 2011/12 and 2012/13 field seasons. Meteorology data were collected using an aspirated psychrometer and temperature and humidity sensors mounted above the bridge of the ship. Wavex and Autoflux systems were run for the duration of each cruise. Bubble size distributions were measured with two acoustic resonators. These cruises formed the field component of NERC Discovery Science project "Waves, Aerosol and Gas Exchange Study (WAGES)”. The data were collected to measure the amount of aerosol at different sizes generated near the surface and transported upwards into the atmosphere, along with the wind speed, wave size and white-capping under a wide range of different conditions. The aim was to improve understanding of aerosol generation and ultimately the way in which clouds are represented within climate models. The Discovery Science project was composed of three Standard Grants. The lead grant, NE/G00353X/1, was held by the University of Leeds, School of Earth and Environment, with Professor Ian M. Brooks as principal investigator. The funding period for this grant was 01 August 2009 to 31 March 2014. Child grant NE/G003696/1 was held by the National Oceanography Centre, Department of Science and Technology and was led by Professor Meric Srokosz. The funding period for this grant was 01 September 2009 to 31 March 2014. The third grant was held under the title “pCO2 data collection on James Clark Ross in support of Autoflux” at the Plymouth Marine Laboratory. It was led by Professor Phillip D. Nightingale and was funded for the period covering 01 April 2010 to 31 March 2013. All data described have been received by BODC from the RRS James Clark Ross and will be processed and made available online in the future. Raw data are available on request.