From 1 - 3 / 3
  • Categories  

    This datasets contains a box model of the atmosphere‐ocean to understand surface warming response and explain how surface warming varies in time with carbon emissions. The box model consists of three homogeneous layers: a well‐mixed atmosphere, an ocean mixed layer with 100‐m thickness, and an ocean interior with 3,900‐m thickness, all assumed to have the same horizontal area. The model solves for the heat and carbon exchange between these layers, including physical and chemical transfers, but ignoring biological transfers, and sediment and weathering interactions. The model is forced from an equilibrium by carbon emitted into the atmosphere with a constant rate of 20 PgC/year for 100 years and integrated for 1,000 years. Ocean ventilation is represented by the ocean interior taking up the heat and carbon properties of the mixed layer on an e-folding time scale of 200 years. The model was generated as part of Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Discovery Science project “Mechanistic controls of surface warming by ocean heat and carbon uptake” standard grant reference NE/N009789/1 lead by Principal Investigator Professor Ric Williams.Model code and associated metadata are held in the archives at the British Oceanographic Data Centre. Other datasets generated by this grant are discoverable via EDMED 6712.

  • Categories  

    This dataset contains derived annual mean globally averaged variables from an existing global coupled carbon-climate Earth System Model and a novel atmosphere-ocean box model to understand surface warming response in terms of changes in global carbon inventories, empirical heat budget, and variation in time with carbon emissions. The source model outputs were generated by Thomas Froelicher in 2015 using a 1000-year simulation of the global coupled carbon-climate Earth System Model developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL ESM2M). A scenario was forced of a 1% annual rate increase in carbon dioxide from preindustrial levels until global mean surface air temperature increased by 2 degrees Celsius since the preindustrial, after this point emissions of carbon were set to zero and all other non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gases were kept at preindustrial levels. Output parameters included: ocean temperature; salinity; dissolved inorganic carbon; ocean alkalinity; dissolved inorganic phosphate; surface air temperature; atmospheric carbon dioxide and cumulative carbon emission. Annual mean variables were then derived from these data. This was determined by calculated changes in: ocean carbon inventory; ocean carbon under saturation; saturated dissolved inorganic carbon; ocean dissolved inorganic carbon; radiative forcing from carbon dioxide; and ocean heat uptake. Additionally the dependence of radiative forcing on carbon emissions, dependence of surface warming on radiative forcing and surface warming dependence on radiative forcing were determined. The box model consists of three homogeneous layers: a well‐mixed atmosphere; an ocean mixed layer with 100‐m thickness; and an ocean interior with 3,900‐m thickness, all assumed to have the same horizontal area. The model solves for the heat and carbon exchange between these layers, including physical and chemical transfers, however ignoring biological transfers, and sediment and weathering interactions. The model is forced from an equilibrium by carbon emitted into the atmosphere with a constant rate of 20 PgC/year for 100 years and integrated for 1,000 years. Ocean ventilation is represented by the ocean interior taking up the heat and carbon properties of the mixed layer on an e-folding time scale of 200 years. These datasets were generated as part of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Discovery Science project “Mechanistic controls of surface warming by ocean heat and carbon uptake” standard grant reference NE/N009789/1 lead by Principal Investigator - Professor Ric Williams, University of Liverpool and Co-Investigator - Dr Philip Goodwin, University of Southampton. Data are acrvhived at the British Oceanographic Data Centre.

  • Categories  

    This dataset consists of measurements of wave height, direction and frequency, bubble size distribution, Autoflux measurements of air-sea fluxes CO2, and WAVEX measurements of directional wave radar. Data were collected onboard the RRS James Clark Ross in the Weddell Sea during cruises in the 2010/2011, 2011/12 and 2012/13 field seasons. Meteorology data were collected using an aspirated psychrometer and temperature and humidity sensors mounted above the bridge of the ship. Wavex and Autoflux systems were run for the duration of each cruise. Bubble size distributions were measured with two acoustic resonators. These cruises formed the field component of NERC Discovery Science project "Waves, Aerosol and Gas Exchange Study (WAGES)”. The data were collected to measure the amount of aerosol at different sizes generated near the surface and transported upwards into the atmosphere, along with the wind speed, wave size and white-capping under a wide range of different conditions. The aim was to improve understanding of aerosol generation and ultimately the way in which clouds are represented within climate models. The Discovery Science project was composed of three Standard Grants. The lead grant, NE/G00353X/1, was held by the University of Leeds, School of Earth and Environment, with Professor Ian M. Brooks as principal investigator. The funding period for this grant was 01 August 2009 to 31 March 2014. Child grant NE/G003696/1 was held by the National Oceanography Centre, Department of Science and Technology and was led by Professor Meric Srokosz. The funding period for this grant was 01 September 2009 to 31 March 2014. The third grant was held under the title “pCO2 data collection on James Clark Ross in support of Autoflux” at the Plymouth Marine Laboratory. It was led by Professor Phillip D. Nightingale and was funded for the period covering 01 April 2010 to 31 March 2013. All data described have been received by BODC from the RRS James Clark Ross and will be processed and made available online in the future. Raw data are available on request.