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  • The data set encompasses the data generated through the 8 experimental runs on the 25 kWth calcium looping pilot plant at Cranfield University arranged into 8 functional Excel spreadsheets. The operational data are gathered by the acquisition with Labview software (the composition of the gas from the calciner and carbonator; temperatures of the electrical furnaces on the preheating lines and around the calciner; temperatures of the gas in the preheating lines and in the calciner) and Pico software (temperatures in the carbonator and lower loop seal and pressures in the calciner and in the carbonator). Moreover, the data from the experimental diary (inputs of gasses and solids into the rig) and the data from the post-processing of the extracted solids are included. All the data are combined into comprehensible charts that describe and explain the experimental runs together with the mass and energetic model of the system during steady state operations.

  • Mg/Ca in multiple species of planktonic foraminifera from five time slices since the Middle Miocene to present (target ages 15, 12.5, 10, 7.5, 4.5, 2.5 and 0 Ma). These samples are from a range of globally and latitudinally distributed DSDP (Deep Sea Drilling Program), ODP (Ocean Drilling Program), IODP (International Ocean Discovery Program) open ocean sites. From low to high latitudes these are: Site U1338, U1489 (Eastern and Western Equatorial Pacific), Sites 871, 872, and Site U1490, (Western Tropical Pacific), Site 242 (Mozambique Channel, Indian Ocean), U1482 (Australian Continental Margin), Site 516 (Western Atlantic Ocean), Site 1138 (Kerguelen Plateau, Southern Ocean). The Mg/Ca ratios were measured using Inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) at Cardiff University between December 2018 and June 2019. The data were collected to explore Mg/Ca values for modern and extinct species at different intervals of time (which were different climatically) and at different geographical locations. This data was collected by E.Mawbey as part of a project funded by NERC (Q10 project) to investigate changes in foraminiferal depth habitat in response to different climate conditions.

  • We used existing coretop samples from several sites from the Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans (Fig. 1 and Table S1) to test the relationship between Mg/Ca ratios and D47 values in modern foraminifera. In the North Atlantic the cores were the same as those used previously by Elderfield and Ganssen (2000) (Tables S1 and S2). Coretops with the potential to yield large (>5 mg) mono-specific samples of foraminifera were selected from the >300 lm size fraction of the sediment except for Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral) where the >150 lm size fraction was chosen to obtain sufficient material. After cleaning the samples consisted of _3 mg of foraminiferal calcite and included 8 different species of surface- and deepdwelling planktonic foraminifera: Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globorotalia hirsuta, Globorotalia inflata, Globorotalia menardii, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (s), and Orbulina universa. The Godwin Laboratory clumped isotope calibration (i.e., the regression between D47 and temperature) was established using natural cave carbonates that precipitated subaqueously at known temperatures, ranging from 3 to 47ºC (Table 1, Fig. 2). These carbonates grew under conditions that minimize CO2-degassing and evaporation and hence kinetic fractionation effects are negligible owing to an unlimited DIC pool in the water (Kele et al., 2015). All samples consist of calcite, except NAICA-1 which is aragonite.

  • The London Earth data is part of a nationwide project to determine the distribution of chemical elements in the surface environment, namely Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE). London Earth focuses on the soil of the capital city, the limits of the survey being defined by the Greater London Authority (GLA) administrative boundary. Chemical elements have been determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS) at the laboratories of the British Geological Survey (BGS) in Keyworth, Nottingham. These results are presented as a MS Excel file.

  • The dataset contains concentrations of Total Organic Carbon, Chloride, Fluoride, Bromine, Sulfate, Potassium, Aluminium, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Sodium, Phosphorus, Chromium, Manganese, Cobalt, Nickel, Copper, Zinc, Arsenic, Selenium, Molybdenum, Cadmium, Lead and stable water isotopes (δD and δ18O) for 25 groundwater and surface water sampling locations, surveyed over the period February 2017 to May 2018 immediately following Dineo floods. The data were collected as part of the PULA project, which aimed at understanding the immediate effect of heavy rainfall and floods on water resources in arid Botswana and their transitional hydrologic readjustment towards the dry period, and the role of these events in supporting either or both resources replenishment and contamination. The project was co-ordinated by the University of Aberdeen, with partners at the Botswana International University of Science and Technology, the Government of Botswana Department of Water Affairs, and the International Water Management Institute. The project was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council as part of its Urgency grants scheme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c7793128-1961-45d5-aa18-5f023116784b

  • This dataset represents the first publication of complete national maps from the Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) and TellusNI projects, whose aim was to conduct a national geochemical survey of the United Kingdom in order to improve understanding of our geology and environment and provide quantitative evidence against which to gauge future environmental change. This dataset consists of a series of interpolated raster (ASCII grid) maps displaying the concentrations of a suite of chemical elements (and oxides) in the stream sediments of the United Kingdom. The chemical elements are as follows: Arsenic, Barium, Calcium (CaO), Chromium, Cobalt, Copper, Iron (Fe2O3), Lanthanum, Lead, Magnesium (MgO), Manganese (MnO), Nickel, Potassium (K2O), Rubidium, Uranium, Vanadium, Zinc and Zirconium.

  • Discrete data for major ions and nutrients in river water for 13 sites in the Humber catchment over the periods 1993 to 1997 and 1996 to 1997 and for 3 sites from the Tweed catchment over the period 1994 to 1997. Ions and nutrients measured were: Ammonia, Calcium (dissolved), Magnesium (dissolved), Potassium (dissolved), Sodium (dissolved), Bromide-ion, Carbon (organic dissolved), Chloride-ion, Nitrate, Nitrite, Phosphorus (soluble reactive), Phosphorus (total dissolved), Silicate (reactive dissolved), Sulphate, Carbon (organic particulate), Nitrogen (particulate), Phosphorus (total). Sites were sampled at regular weekly intervals and more intermittently during high flows (on average an extra sampling once a month per site). Samples were obtained using a wide neck PTFE bottle in a plastic covered bottle carrier (lowered from bridges where possible otherwise collected by immersing sample bottle by hand in the water as near the main flow as possible). Samples were filtered through Whatman 0.45um sterile membrane filters immediately on return to laboratory. Samples stored in sterilin tubes in the dark at 40C and analysed by Dionex DX100 ion chromatography system. Silicate reactive dissolved and Chloride-ion concentrations were determined by automated colourimetry and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were determined using a TOCsin II aqueous carbon analyser. Some samples on the River Aire were collected using EPIC automatic samplers. The analysis was carried out by members of the analytical chemistry section at York University (from April 1994 until November 1996) and at Wallingford Institute of Hydrology (September 1993 to April 1994 and December 1996 to April 1997), as part of the Land Ocean Interaction Study (LOIS). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4482fa14-aee2-4c7f-9c62-a08dc9704051

  • This dataset contains nitrogen data from nitrate, ammonium and nitrite, total nitrogen and carbon data, and elemental composition data from anaerobic digestate and biomass ash from UK bioenergy production. Anaerobic digestate was sampled 8 times from different industrial scale plants across the UK between January 2015 and January 2018 and biomass ash was sampled in January 2015 and June 2016. Anaerobic digestate was sourced from segregated food waste (mainly household waste), pig slurry, maize silage, vegetables waste, sweet corn waste, aerobically treated food waste, food manufacturer waste and other biodegradable sludge from within the UK. Biomass ash, both fly and bottom ash, from virgin and recycled wood was sourced from three sites within the UK and one from Spain. All laboratory analyses were undertaken at Lancaster University using standardised methods. The data were collected as part of the research grant, Developing a suite of novel land conditioners and plant fertilizers from the waste streams of biomass energy generation. The research was funded by NERC, award NE/L014122/1. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/990c54f6-5c92-4054-8bfa-953533a89149

  • Trace metal mobilisation data (pH, ALK, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Li, SO4, Si, Be, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Al,Sr, Be, Ba, Y,Co, Ni, B, Rb, Y, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Pb, Th, U) for the River Carnon, the River Fal (downstream) and its estuary in Cornwall following discharge of highly polluted water from the Wheal Jane mine. In January 1992, there was a major pollution incident involving highly acidic wastes. CEH, in conjunction with the University of Reading monitored the River Carnon between September 1992 and April 1994, to examine the water quality.