From 1 - 10 / 21
  • The Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact Experiment (ADRIEX) was a joint UK Met Office/Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)/UK Royal Society/University of Oslo project aiming at improving our understanding of the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosol and gases (ozone and methane) in the troposphere. This dataset contains backward trajectories arriving over Europe from the TOMCAT model. “Chemical attributes” are found by interpolating chemical distributions (in space and time) from a global chemical transport model to the origin of each trajectory (using its full length). During the ICARTT campaign the TOMCAT global CTM is being run in near-real time (about 19 hours behind present) driven by wind analyses from the ECMWF. The back trajectories are sufficiently long that a TOMCAT chemical analysis exists even at the origin of forecast trajectories. For example, the longest forecast lead time for the Azores domain is 5 days but the back trajectories are 7 days long so that the TOMCAT fields dating from 2 days before the latest meteorological analysis are used to find the attributes. For the US East Coast domain the back trajectories are shorter (3 days long) but the longest lead time is also 3 days so that the chemical attributes can be calculated as soon as TOMCAT has been brought up to date with the latest ECMWF analyses.

  • The Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact Experiment (ADRIEX) was a joint UK Met Office/Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)/UK Royal Society/University of Oslo project aiming at improving our understanding of the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosol and gases (ozone and methane) in the troposphere. This dataset contains ECMWF Convective precipitation model from a ECMWF Computer.

  • The Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact Experiment (ADRIEX) was a joint UK Met Office/Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)/UK Royal Society/University of Oslo project aiming at improving our understanding of the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosol and gases (ozone and methane) in the troposphere. This dataset contains NOx outputs from the TOMCAT model. “Chemical attributes” are found by interpolating chemical distributions (in space and time) from a global chemical transport model to the origin of each trajectory (using its full length). During the ICARTT campaign the TOMCAT global CTM is being run in near-real time (about 19 hours behind present) driven by wind analyses from the ECMWF. The back trajectories are sufficiently long that a TOMCAT chemical analysis exists even at the origin of forecast trajectories. For example, the longest forecast lead time for the Azores domain is 5 days but the back trajectories are 7 days long so that the TOMCAT fields dating from 2 days before the latest meteorological analysis are used to find the attributes. For the US East Coast domain the back trajectories are shorter (3 days long) but the longest lead time is also 3 days so that the chemical attributes can be calculated as soon as TOMCAT has been brought up to date with the latest ECMWF analyses.

  • The Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact Experiment (ADRIEX) was a joint UK Met Office/Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)/UK Royal Society/University of Oslo project aiming at improving our understanding of the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosol and gases (ozone and methane) in the troposphere. This dataset contains forecast trajectories computed using UTRAJ. The term “particle trajectory” describes the path of a point which is blown by a time dependent wind field (i.e. (u, v, w) as a function of (x, y, z, t)). Trajectories following the analysed wind field are described by their coordinates (e.g. longitude, latitude, pressure) at regularly spaced time intervals. “Domain filling” refers to calculations where the arrival points of back trajectories (or release points for forward trajectories) form a dense, regular grid in a specified volume. The term “reverse” is used to indicate that the particles are followed backwards in time. Back trajectories are assumed to arrive on a 3D grid consisting of a stack of horizontal grids (regular in longitude and latitude) on a range of pressure levels. Forward trajectories are assumed to depart from similar grids. The trajectory length (time before arrival for back trajectories) is denoted by the letter T. Other fields can also be recorded following the trajectories: for example, temperature, specific humidity or potential vorticity. These extra fields are described as “attributes” and will be denoted by the variable C. The change in the value of an attribute over the length of a trajectory is denoted by C(0) − C(T).

  • The Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact Experiment (ADRIEX) was a joint UK Met Office/Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)/UK Royal Society/University of Oslo project aiming at improving our understanding of the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosol and gases (ozone and methane) in the troposphere. This dataset contains CO ouputs from the TOMCAT model. “Chemical attributes” are found by interpolating chemical distributions (in space and time) from a global chemical transport model to the origin of each trajectory (using its full length). During the ICARTT campaign the TOMCAT global CTM is being run in near-real time (about 19 hours behind present) driven by wind analyses from the ECMWF. The back trajectories are sufficiently long that a TOMCAT chemical analysis exists even at the origin of forecast trajectories. For example, the longest forecast lead time for the Azores domain is 5 days but the back trajectories are 7 days long so that the TOMCAT fields dating from 2 days before the latest meteorological analysis are used to find the attributes. For the US East Coast domain the back trajectories are shorter (3 days long) but the longest lead time is also 3 days so that the chemical attributes can be calculated as soon as TOMCAT has been brought up to date with the latest ECMWF analyses.

  • The Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact Experiment (ADRIEX) was a joint UK Met Office/Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)/UK Royal Society/University of Oslo project aiming at improving our understanding of the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosol and gases (ozone and methane) in the troposphere. This dataset contains ECMWF medium level cloud model from a ECMWF Computer.

  • The Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact Experiment (ADRIEX) was a joint UK Met Office/Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)/UK Royal Society/University of Oslo project aiming at improving our understanding of the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosol and gases (ozone and methane) in the troposphere. This dataset contains emission tracers from UTRAJ model. “Emissions tracers” are calculated by integrating surface emissions along each trajectory when it is within the boundary layer. The surface emissions are specified using an inventory. During the ITOP campaign the EDGAR inventories for NOx and isoprene emissions are used to indicate trajectories that are likely to have been influenced by anthropogenic or biogenic emissions respectively. The emissions from the surface are assumed to be instantaneously mixed throughout the boundary layer column so that they are equivalent to a volume source within the boundary layer. The boundary layer depth (time and space dependent) is obtained from the same numerical weather prediction model as provides the wind and temperature fields (usually the ECMWF model). Chemistry and dilution by mixing is not modelled along the trajectories, so the values assigned to back trajectories are not intended to represent concentrations on the arrival grid. Both NOx and isoprene have short photochemical lifetimes compared with the length of trajectories used.

  • The Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact Experiment (ADRIEX) was a joint UK Met Office/Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)/UK Royal Society/University of Oslo project aiming at improving our understanding of the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosol and gases (ozone and methane) in the troposphere. This dataset contains ECMWF Low level cloud model from a ECMWF Computer.

  • The Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact Experiment (ADRIEX) was a joint UK Met Office/Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)/UK Royal Society/University of Oslo project aiming at improving our understanding of the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosol and gases (ozone and methane) in the troposphere. This dataset contains ECMWF Boundary layer model data from a ECMWF Computer.

  • The Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact Experiment (ADRIEX) was a joint UK Met Office/Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)/UK Royal Society/University of Oslo project aiming at improving our understanding of the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosol and gases (ozone and methane) in the troposphere. This dataset contains ECMWF High level cloud model from a ECMWF Computer.