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Marine Scotland Science

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  • The data set comprises temperature and salinity measurements, and nutrient concentrations from strategic locations in the offshore and oceanic waters around Scotland. Additional parameters, including concentrations of dissolved oxygen, suspended particulate material, and chlorophyll pigments, are available for many sites. The measurements are from research cruises taking place typically three times each year, and dating back to 1989. The data set now forms one of the longest hydrographic time series in the world. Marine Scotland scientists use the research vessels FRV Scotia and FRV Alba na Mara to deploy Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) probes from the sea surface to the seabed at a number of fixed stations and other sites of interest. The CTD rigs include ancillary sensors and water sampling devices, which are used to collect water samples for calibration of the in situ sensor data. In 2001, short and long term moorings were also added to Marine Scotland’s data collection activities with current meters, temperature recorders and water level recorders being deployed on moorings in waters around Scotland. Similar to the CTD casts, the research vessels FRV Scotia and FRV Alba na Mara are used to deploy and recover the moorings. Marine Scotland undertakes research and monitoring in both the freshwater and marine environments to provide scientific and technical advice on a wide range of marine and fisheries issues. This is with an aim to examine how the environmental status of Scotland’s seas and oceans varies in response to many pressures, including wide scale natural variability. This will help secure the Scottish Governments’ vision of clean, healthy, safe, productive and biologically diverse marine and coastal environments, managed to meet the long term needs of nature and people. Marine Scotland is part of, and funded by the Scottish Government. Marine Scotland makes annual submissions of CTD and mooring data to BODC.

  • The Marine Environment Monitoring and Assessment National database (MERMAN) is a national database which holds and provides access to data collected under the Clean Safe Seas Environmental Monitoring Programme (CSEMP) formerly the National Marine Monitoring Programme (NMMP). The data collected are the responsibility of the Competent Monitoring Authorities (CMAs) who collect the samples from stations in UK waters using water sampling techniques, trawls, nets or grabs. The CMAs then send the collected samples to accredited laboratories where they are analysed. A weighting is calculated, based on the quality of the analysis. The weighting score incorporates the laboratory accreditation, reference material, inter-laboratory comparisons, detection limits, uncertainties and standard deviations. Where data do not meet a threshold score they are given a status of ‘FAIL’ and although they are stored they are not made available to external users. The MERMAN dataset starts in 1987 with greater use of the database occurring from 1997 onwards. Data are submitted by the CMAs annually and an annual submission may include updates to legacy data to provide additional data or improve data/metadata. The data held in MERMAN fulfils the UK's mandatory monitoring requirements under the Oslo and Paris Convention (OSPAR) Joint Assessments and Monitoring Programme (JAMP). These data are used in support of European Commission (EC) directives and national assessments, such as Charting Progress 2 and are also supplied to the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNET).

  • The Marine Environment Monitoring and Assessment National database (MERMAN) is a national database which holds and provides access to data collected under the Clean Safe Seas Environmental Monitoring Programme (CSEMP) formerly the National Marine Monitoring Programme (NMMP). The data collected are the responsibility of the Competent Monitoring Authorities (CMAs) who collect the samples from stations in UK waters using water sampling techniques, trawls, nets or grabs. The CMAs then send the collected samples to accredited laboratories where they are analysed. A weighting is calculated, based on the quality of the analysis. The weighting score incorporates the laboratory accreditation, reference material, inter-laboratory comparisons, detection limits, uncertainties and standard deviations. Where data do not meet a threshold score they are given a status of ‘FAIL’ and although they are stored they are not made available to external users. The MERMAN contaminants, nutrients, biological and eutrophication effects in water data start in 1999. Data are submitted by the CMAs annually and an annual submission may include updates to legacy data to provide additional data or improve data/metadata. The data held in MERMAN fulfils the UK's mandatory monitoring requirements under the Oslo and Paris Convention (OSPAR) Joint Assessments and Monitoring Programme (JAMP). These data are used in support of European Commission (EC) directives and national assessments, such as Charting Progress 2 and are also supplied to the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNET).

  • The Marine Environment Monitoring and Assessment National database (MERMAN) is a national database which holds and provides access to data collected under the Clean Safe Seas Environmental Monitoring Programme (CSEMP) formerly the National Marine Monitoring Programme (NMMP). The data collected are the responsibility of the Competent Monitoring Authorities (CMAs) who collect the samples from stations in UK waters using water sampling techniques, trawls, nets or grabs. The CMAs then send the collected samples to accredited laboratories where they are analysed. A weighting is calculated, based on the quality of the analysis. The weighting score incorporates the laboratory accreditation, reference material, inter-laboratory comparisons, detection limits, uncertainties and standard deviations. Where data do not meet a threshold score they are given a status of ‘FAIL’ and although they are stored they are not made available to external users. The MERMAN contaminants and biological effects in sediment data start in 1987 with greater use of the database occurring from 1997 onwards. Data are submitted by the CMAs annually and an annual submission may include updates to legacy data to provide additional data or improve data/metadata. The data held in MERMAN fulfils the UK's mandatory monitoring requirements under the Oslo and Paris Convention (OSPAR) Joint Assessments and Monitoring Programme (JAMP). These data are used in support of European Commission (EC) directives and national assessments, such as Charting Progress 2 and are also supplied to the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNET).

  • Data on timing of breeding, breeding success and diet of the European shag, sampled from the Isle of May population. The data were collected between 1985 and 2015 by visually checking nests and collecting regurgitated diet samples. These data are part of the Isle of May long-term study to assess population trends of seabirds under environmental change (IMLOTS https://www.ceh.ac.uk/our-science/projects/isle-may-long-term-study). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6231bd5b-ee2d-4cca-a9ef-88006ffa4976