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  • This is the high frequency (10 Hz) eddy covariance (EC) measurements which mainly contain the wind data, ship motion data, gas concentration data and the underway measurements. These data were measured on summer 2019 during two Arctic cruises JR18006 (from and to Aberdeen, UK and visited the Barents Sea ) and JR18007 (from Harwich, UK to Svalbard and visited the Greenland Sea). These EC data can be used to directly calculate the air-sea CO2 and sensible heat fluxes. The EC system was deployed on RRS James Clark Ross by Thomas Bell and Mingxi Yang (Plymouth Marine Laboratory). Please see Dong et al., (2021) for details of these EC data. Eddy covariance air-sea CO2 flux measurements were made possible by funding from the NERC ORCHESTRA (NE/N018095/1) and European Space Agency AMT4oceanSatFluxCCN (4000125730/18/NL/FF /gp) projects.

  • We present a petrophysical catalogue of new density and susceptibility measurements conducted on 320 rock samples from northern Victoria Land, East Antarctica. The rock samples are stored by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) in Berlin-Spandau and Hanover, Germany. Funding for this research was provided by NERC through a SENSE CDT studentship (NE/T00939X/1)

  • A new version of this dataset exists. To see the last version of the Antarctic Digital Database, have a look here: https://data.bas.ac.uk/collections/e74543c0-4c4e-4b41-aa33-5bb2f67df389/ Coastline for Antarctica created from various mapping and remote sensing sources, provided as polygons with ''land'', ''ice shelf'', ''ice tongue'' or ''rumple'''' attribute. This dataset has been generalised from the high resolution vector polygons. Covering all land and ice shelves south of 60S. Suitable for topographic mapping and analysis. Data compiled, managed and distributed by the Mapping and Geographic Information Centre and the UK Polar Data Centre, British Antarctic Survey on behalf of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research. Major changes in v7.4 include updates to coastline and ice shelves between Gipps Ice Rise and Ronne Ice Shelf, updated ice shelf fronts for Brunt, Stange and West ice shelves, Pine Island Glacier, and an updated coastline for Adelaide Island.

  • This dataset comprises mRNA that was extracted from Laternula elliptica developmental stages (blastula to juvenile) and sequenced (n=3 pools of 200 individual per stage). The resulting sequence data was analysed and the following results files and analysis scripts are available here: Results files from differential gene expression analysis in edgeR (edgeR_DE), results files from WGCNA analysis (WGCNA). Data collection was carried out over Hangar Cove Rothera Point, Adelaide Island, in Ryder Bay, from 2018-04-25 to 2018-09-25 by researchers with the British Antarctic Survey. The data was collected as part of research on the developmental biology of molluscs. This work was supported by UKRI Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Core Funding to the British Antarctic Survey, a DTG Studentship (Project Reference: NE/J500173/1) and a Junior Research Fellowship to VAS from Wolfson College, University of Cambridge.

  • This dataset captures information on the diet composition and mass of Adelie penguin stomach contents at Signy Island, from 1997 to 2020. The monitoring period occurred over four weeks each year and involved sampling adults returning to feed their chicks during the creche period. Sampling took place approximately every five days. Numbers of birds sampled on each occasion varied over the entire period of the dataset from a maximum of eight to a minimum of six, equating to an annual maximum of forty birds and an annual minimum of thirty, depending on the year. All adult penguins were sampled on their return to the colony using the stomach lavage methodology specified in CCAMLR (Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources) Ecosystem Monitoring Program (CEMP) Standard Methods A8A. The stomach samples were then weighed and categorised into krill, cephalopods, fish and non-food and identified to species level where possible. Krill carapaces and otoliths were removed and measured. Ecosystems component of BAS Polar Science for Planet Earth Programme, funded by NERC.

  • Relativistic electrons in the Earth''s outer radiation belt are a significant space weather hazard. Satellites in GPS-type orbits pass through the heart of the outer radiation belt where they may be exposed to large fluxes of relativistic electrons. In this study we conduct an extreme value analysis of the daily average relativistic electron flux in GPS orbit as a function of energy and L using data from the US NS41 satellite from 10 December 2000 to 25 July 2020. The 1 in 10 year flux at L=4.5, in the heart of the outer radiation belt, decreases with increasing energy ranging from 8.2x10^6 cm^-2s^-1sr^-1MeV^-1 at E = 0.6 MeV to 33 cm^-2s^-1sr^-1MeV^-1 at E = 8.0 MeV. The 1 in 100 year is a factor of 1.1 to 1.7 larger than the corresponding 1 in 10 year event. The 1 in 10 year flux at L=6.5, on field lines which map to the vicinity of geostationary orbit, decrease with increasing energy ranging from 6.2x10^5 cm^-2s^-1sr^-1MeV^-1 at E = 0.6 MeV to 0.48 cm^-2s^-1sr^-1MeV^-1 at E = 8.0 MeV. Here, the 1 in 100 year event is a factor of 1.1 to 13 times larger than the corresponding 1 in 10 year event, with the value of the factor increasing with increasing energy. Our analysis suggests that the fluxes of relativistic electrons with energies in the range 0.6 <= E <= 2.0 MeV in the region 4.25 <= L <= 4.75 have an upper bound. In contrast, further out and at higher energies the fluxes of relativistic electrons are largely unbounded. The research leading to these results has received funding from the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) grants NE/V00249X/1 (Sat-Risk) and NE/R016038/1.

  • Simulated ice thickness (ice, metres, 100 m grid spacing) and supraglacial debris thickness (debris, metres, 100 m grid spacing) for Khumbu Glacier, Nepal, produced using the iSOSIA ice-flow model presented in Rowan et al. (2021; Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface). The model domains used for the entire glacier and active glacier simulations (metres above sea level, 100 m grid spacing), and the present-day ice thickness estimate (metres, 30 m grid spacing) used to create the subglacial topography are included. The files contained in this collection present the outputs from three experiments carried out in Rowan et al. (2021; Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface): 1. Simulation with a continuous debris layer, where h0 = 0.23 m and dT = 1.5 degC, showing the effect of change in mean annual air temperature to the present day (2015 CE) from 1.5 degC relative to the Little Ice Age 2. Simulation with a discontinuous debris layer, where h0 = 0.94 m and dT = 1.5 degC 3. Simulation with a discontinuous debris layer of the active glacier, where h0 = 0.94 m and dT = 1.5 degC The subglacial DEMs used for the model domains for the entire glacier and the active glacier, and the present-day (2015 CE) ice thickness estimated by Rowan et al. (2015, EPSL) to create the subglacial topography are also included (3 files). Funded by NERC under grant: NE/P00265X/1 "EverDrill: Accessing the interior and bed of a Himalayan debris-covered glacier to forecast future mass loss" to Duncan Quincey (PI) and Ann Rowan (CoI).

  • The dataset comprises of analyses of two sediment cores (LC12 and LC7), extracted from Blaso, a large epishelf lake on the margin of 79 degrees N Ice Shelf, NW Greenland in July-August 2017. The data are used to constrain ice shelf dynamics over the last 8500 calibrated years before present (cal. years B.P., where present is A.D. 1950). Data for the LC7 and LC12 sediment records consist of radiocarbon (14C) chronology data. Overlapping 2 m-long sediment cores were recovered with a UWITEC KOL ''Kolbenlot percussion piston corer to a total sediment depth of 3.74 m (LC7) and 5.24 m (LC12). Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used for radiocarbon (14C) dating. Core LC7: 87 m water depth; 79.589 degrees N, 22.494 degrees E. Core LC12: 90 m water depth; 79.5948 degrees N, 22.44233 degrees E. This project was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) through Standard Grant NE/N011228/1. We thank the Alfred Wegner Institute, and particularly Angelika Humbert and Hicham Rafiq, for their significant logistic support through the iGRIFF project. Additional support was provided from Station Nord (Jorgen Skafte), Nordland Air, Air Greenland and the Joint Arctic Command. Naalakkersuisut, Government of Greenland, provided Scientific Survey (VU-00121) and Export (046/2017) licences for this work

  • This dataset contains the floe size distribution (FSD) data derived from multi-satellite imagery data acquired across the Arctic Ocean. Satellite imagery data includes high-resolution visible images from the USGS Global Fiducials Library (MEDEA), TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X and Worldview-3 (WV3). The derived data contain floe size (calliper diameter), shape factor, minor/major axis, perimeter and area of the floes. This data set has been used to investigate the characteristics of the FSD during major seasonal evaluation stages of Arctic sea ice floes. The retrieval of the FSD data was done by the University of Huddersfield team. This work was funded by NERC MOSAiC program NE/S002545/1.

  • This data assesses the ability of 8 species, from 7 classes representing a range of functional groups, to survive, for 100 to 303 days, at temperatures 0 to 4 degrees Celsius above previously calculated long-term temperature limits. Survivors were then tested for acclimation responses to acute warming. Acclimatisation in the field was tested in the seastar Odontaster validus collected in different years, seasons and locations within Antarctica. Finally, we tested the importance of oxygen limitation in controlling survival duration by incubating 7 species under normoxia (20%) and mild hyperoxia (30%). This study was funded by Natural Environment Research Council core funding to the British Antarctic Survey and Spitfire DTP funding to R.E.S.