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  • Data from the Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) programme's round 1 research project "Dynamics and Chemistry of Frontal Zones" (DCFZ). DCFZ investigated the role of frontal shear zones in determining upper tropospheric chemical distributions. This dataset contains Chilbolton radar images.

  • The Icelandic Volcano, Eyjafjallajokull, started erupting on 14th April 2010. The volcanic ash cloud produced covered much of Northern Europe for several weeks causing extensive disruption to air travel. The UK and European atmospheric communities had many instruments - both airborne and ground-based, remote sensing and in-situ - taking measurements of the ash cloud throughout this period. This dataset contains a variety of satellite products including dust and sulphur dioxide (SO2) retrievals.

  • Meteosat-7 and its predecessors were the first generation of earth observation dedicated geostationary satellites located at 36000 km above the intersection of the Equator and the Greenwich Meridian. Although superseded by MSG-1 (renamed Meteosat-8) in 2005, Meteosat-7 remained as back-up at 0o longitude until 14th June 2006. Meteosat-7 will be moved to 63oE longitude to continue coverage of the Indian Ocean and take over from Meteosat-5. Meteosat-7 was launched by the European Space Agency and operated by Eumetsat. This dataset contains visible images from Meteosat Geostationary Satellites First Generation North Atlantic.

  • Meteosat-7 and its predecessors were the first generation of earth observation dedicated geostationary satellites located at 36000 km above the intersection of the Equator and the Greenwich Meridian. Although superseded by MSG-1 (renamed Meteosat-8) in 2005, Meteosat-7 remained as back-up at 0o longitude until 14th June 2006. Meteosat-7 will be moved to 63oE longitude to continue coverage of the Indian Ocean and take over from Meteosat-5. Meteosat-7 was launched by the European Space Agency and operated by Eumetsat. This dataset contains visible images from Meteosat Geostationary Satellites First Generation over Europe and the North Atlantic.

  • The Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites, operated by EUMETSAT (The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites), provide almost continuous imagery to meteorologists and researchers in Europe and around the world. These include visible, infra-red, water vapour, High Resolution Visible (HRV) images and derived cloud top height, cloud top temperature, fog, snow detection and volcanic ash products. These images are available for a range of geographical areas. This dataset contains infa-red images from MSG satellites over the UKV domain area. Imagery available from March 2005 onwards at a frequency of 15 minutes (some are hourly) and are at least 24 hours old.

  • Meteosat-7 and its predecessors were the first generation of earth observation dedicated geostationary satellites located at 36000 km above the intersection of the Equator and the Greenwich Meridian. Although superseded by MSG-1 (renamed Meteosat-8) in 2005, Meteosat-7 remained as back-up at 0o longitude until 14th June 2006. Meteosat-7 will be moved to 63oE longitude to continue coverage of the Indian Ocean and take over from Meteosat-5. Meteosat-7 was launched by the European Space Agency and operated by Eumetsat. This dataset contains water vapour images from Meteosat Geostationary Satellites First Generation satellites over Europe and the North Atlantic.

  • The Flood Action Team (FLoAT) project is intended to collate a variety of data collected during the June and July 2007 Flood events in the UK (e.g. Tewkesbury event in 2007). This project is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) - project Ref. R8/H12/69 - through the Flood Risk for Extreme Events (FREE) NERC directed mode programme. Aerial images of the Tewkesbury area, which include the river Severn and the river Avon, were collected during the flood events of summer 2007.

  • The Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites, operated by EUMETSAT (The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites), provide almost continuous imagery to meteorologists and researchers in Europe and around the world. These include visible, infra-red, water vapour, High Resolution Visible (HRV) images and derived cloud top height, cloud top temperature, fog, snow detection and volcanic ash products. These images are available for a range of geographical areas. This dataset contains infa-red images from MSG satellites over the full disc. Imagery available from March 2005 onwards at a frequency of 15 minutes (some are hourly) and are at least 24 hours old.

  • Meteosat-7 and its predecessors were the first generation of earth observation dedicated geostationary satellites located at 36000 km above the intersection of the Equator and the Greenwich Meridian. Although superseded by MSG-1 (renamed Meteosat-8) in 2005, Meteosat-7 remained as back-up at 0o longitude until 14th June 2006. Meteosat-7 will be moved to 63oE longitude to continue coverage of the Indian Ocean and take over from Meteosat-5. Meteosat-7 was launched by the European Space Agency and operated by Eumetsat. This dataset contains thermal infra-red images from Meteosat Geostationary Satellites First Generation over Europe and North Atlantic.

  • Meteosat-7 and its predecessors were the first generation of earth observation dedicated geostationary satellites located at 36000 km above the intersection of the Equator and the Greenwich Meridian. Although superseded by MSG-1 (renamed Meteosat-8) in 2005, Meteosat-7 remained as back-up at 0o longitude until 14th June 2006. Meteosat-7 will be moved to 63oE longitude to continue coverage of the Indian Ocean and take over from Meteosat-5. Meteosat-7 was launched by the European Space Agency and operated by Eumetsat. This dataset contains visible images from Meteosat Geostationary Satellites First Generation over Europe.