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  • This dataset captures information on the diet composition and mass of Adelie penguin stomach contents at Signy Island, from 1997 to 2020. The monitoring period occurred over four weeks each year and involved sampling adults returning to feed their chicks during the creche period. Sampling took place approximately every five days. Numbers of birds sampled on each occasion varied over the entire period of the dataset from a maximum of eight to a minimum of six, equating to an annual maximum of forty birds and an annual minimum of thirty, depending on the year. All adult penguins were sampled on their return to the colony using the stomach lavage methodology specified in CCAMLR (Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources) Ecosystem Monitoring Program (CEMP) Standard Methods A8A. The stomach samples were then weighed and categorised into krill, cephalopods, fish and non-food and identified to species level where possible. Krill carapaces and otoliths were removed and measured. Ecosystems component of BAS Polar Science for Planet Earth Programme, funded by NERC.

  • This dataset captures information on the diet composition and mass of gentoo penguin stomach contents at Signy Island, from 1998 to 2010. The monitoring period occurred over four weeks each year and involved sampling adults returning to feed their chicks during the creche period. Sampling took place approximately every five days. Numbers of birds sampled on each occasion varied over the entire period of the dataset from a maximum of eight to a minimum of six, equating to an annual maximum of forty birds and annual minimum of thirty, depending on the year. All adult penguins were sampled on their return to the colony using the stomach lavage methodology specified in CCAMLR CEMP Standard Methods A8A. The stomach samples were then weighed and categorised into krill, cephalopods, fish and non-food and identified to species level where possible. Krill carapaces and otoliths were removed and measured. Ecosystems component of BAS Polar Science for Planet Earth Programme, funded by NERC.

  • This dataset captures information on the diet composition and mass of chinstrap penguin stomach contents at Signy Island, from 1997 to 2020. The monitoring period occurred over four weeks each year and involved sampling adults returning to feed their chicks during the creche period. Sampling took place approximately every five days. Numbers of birds sampled on each occasion varied over the entire period of the dataset from a maximum of eight to a minimum of six, equating to an annual maximum of forty birds and an annual minimum of thirty, depending on the year. All adult penguins were sampled on their return to the colony using the stomach lavage methodology specified in CCAMLR CEMP Standards Methods A8A. The stomach samples were then weighed and categorised into krill, cephalopods, fish and non-food and identified to species level where possible. Krill carapaces and otoliths were removed and measured. Ecosystems component of BAS Polar Science for Planet Earth Programme, funded by NERC.

  • The KRILLBASE-length frequency database comprises individual length measurements of 613487 Euphausia superba from 6470 scientific net hauls. Some of these individually-measured krill have additional information on their sex and maturity stage. Most of these E. superba are postlarvae, but some of the hauls include small (< 20 mm) krill which likely include furcilia larvae as well as juveniles. Much of these data were compiled at British Antarctic Survey in 2007 by Mark Jessopp, with additional compilation by Angus Atkinson, Catherine Brewster and Natalie Ensor, and later data checking by Angus Atkinson with Helen Peat. The circumpolar distribution of records is illustrated in the file KRILLBASE_LF_DISTRIBUTION that is available along with this dataset. Examples of uses of KRILLBASE-length frequency are in Atkinson et al. (2009), Tarling et al. (2016), Perry et al. (2019) and Atkinson et al. (2019). The KRILLBASE-length frequency records were provided by contributing authors of the database or transcribed from the literature or from other institutional databases. At the time of data compilation, data from commercial-size large mesh trawls and from the commercial fishery was also transcribed, providing valuable information on the larger krill caught by these nets. These data are not included in this current KRILLBASE-length frequency database version, because of the difficulty in comparing them with the finer mesh scientific nets compiled here, and because length and population structure are also available in more complete form from CCAMLR. The KRILLBASE-length frequency database forms a complementary database to the KRILLBASE-abundance database (doi:10.5285/8b00a915-94e3-4a04-a903-dd4956346439), which compiles the abundance of Euphausia superba and salps in the Southern Ocean (Atkinson et al 2017). Both databases are multi-national, circumpolar compilations of net samples spanning years 1926 to 2016. The KRILLBASE-length frequency database uses some of the stations as KRILLBASE-abundance but also additional ones from targeted hauls or horizontal hauls.

  • The Biological Investigations of Marine Antarctic Systems and Stocks (BIOMASS) Data Set has been created as part of the BIOMASS Programme directed towards deeper understanding of the ecology of the Southern Ocean, with emphasis on krill (Euphausia superba). Data were collected during 34 cruises through a collaboration by 12 countries during three field experiments. These were: the First International BIOMASS Experiment (FIBEX) from November 1980 to April 1981, the Second International BIOMASS Experiment (SIBEX), Part 1 from October 1983 to May 1984 and Part 2 from November 1984 to April 1985. Data were collected on krill distribution from acoustic surveys and krill population structure from net-hauls. Supporting data from ichthyoplankton net-hauls, oceanographic stations (temperature, salinity, nutrients and chlorophyll-a) and observations of sea-birds at sea were also collected. The BIOMASS Data Set is composed of 43 data files, extracted from the BIOMASS Oracle relational database created by the BIOMASS Data Centre that collated and standardised the data. The validation and correction of the data were carried out during data analysis workshops by the BIOMASS Programme scientists who collected the data. The majority of the BIOMASS data have been utilized during BIOMASS workshops. However, some have not been used and must be regarded as unvalidated. The documentation accompanying the BIOMASS data set lists the known problems and validation status of the data. Funding: The BIOMASS Data Set has been generated by the BIOMASS Data Centre funded by the British Antarctic Survey. Main sponsors of the BIOMASS Programme were the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) in collaboration with the International Association for Biological Oceanography and the Advisory Committee on Marine Resources Research of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN.

  • This dataset contains reflectance spectra measurements of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) that were sampled from the Scotia Sea in the Southern Ocean. Reflectance measurements were made on board on freshly caught krill, using a spectroradiometer. A number of these reflectance experiments were carried out across different regions of the Scotia Sea, on male, female and juvenile krill. Reflectance measurements are given for krill in both in situ and filtered seawater, as well as for water without krill. Data are presented in terms of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs). Funding for the work was primarily through a bursary awarded to Anna Belcher from Antarctic Science Ltd. Additionally, funding from the BAS ecosystems programme supported the project. The Natural Environment Research Council Field Spectroscopy Facility (NERC FSF) loaned the equipment required to carry out this research.

  • This dataset contains processed acoustic backscatter data that reflect integrated density estimates for Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba). The acoustic backscatter data are from the Western Core Box (WCB), comprising 8 acoustic transects that span the shelf-break at South Georgia. The data were obtained from a time series of 22 cruises carried out between 1996/97 and 2019/20. Data were collected using either a Simrad EK500 or EK60 echo sounder by biological oceanographers working at the British Antarctic Survey under the Ecosystems scientific research programme and predecessor Discovery 2010 and Dynamo research programmes. Funding was provided by the NERC/BAS Antarctic, Logistic, Infrastructure (ALI) Science and predecessor Long Term Monitoring Science research programmes.