From 1 - 8 / 8
  • Year-round measurements of the water column in Ryder Bay, Western Antarctic Peninsula have been collected by the Rothera Marine Assistant and associated researchers, starting in 1997 as part of the Rothera Oceanographic and Biological Time Series (RATS) to assess temporal variability in physical and biogeochemical oceanographic properties. The data were collected using instrumentation deployed from rigid inflatable boats, or through instrumentation deployed through holes cut in the sea ice when the bay is frozen over in winter. Data collected include profiles to about 500m depth with a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) system that produces measurements of temperature, salinity, fluorescence and photosynthetically-active radiation (PAR). Individual water samples are collected with a Niskin bottle from a standard 15m depth, with some samples also collected from the surface layer. These individual samples are analysed for size-fractionated chlorophyll, macronutrients (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, orthophosphate and silicic acid), stable isotopes of oxygen in seawater, and some ancillary parameters. The bottle data have been quality controlled using international reference standards. Profiling and water sample collection occur with quasi-weekly frequency in summer and weekly in winter, but are weather and sea ice dependent. In addition, daily assessments of sea ice concentration and sea ice type are made from nearby Rothera Research Station by visual inspection, to aid interpretation of the ocean data collected. These data constitute one of the longest time series of ocean measurements in Antarctica, with near-unique systematic data collection in winter, within either polar circle. Data collection has been supported since 1997 by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) through core funding supplied to the British Antarctic Survey. Since 2017, it has been supported by NERC award "National Capability - Polar Expertise Supporting UK Research" (NE/R016038/1).

  • Datasets from a deep sediment trap (3700m) mooring deployed in the Southern Ocean, north-west of South Georgia in December 2015 during the marine cruise JR15002 and recovered in December 2016 by the marine cruise JR16003

  • This dataset contains occurrence records for ten Southern Ocean myctophid fish species that have been downloaded and cleaned from the online biodiversity repository GBIF. As well as providing GBIF documented metadata for each occurrence record, this dataset provides environmental conditions - specifically bathymetry, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and net primary productivity - for each record. Both sea-surface and depth-specific values for the temperature, salinity and oxygen variables are given in separate data files. A third data file of corresponding background points and their associated environmental conditions is also provided. Together these data were used as input files for the MaxEnt ecological niche models within the peer reviewed article: Freer JJ, Tarling GA, Collins MA, Partridge JC, Genner MJ (2020) Estimating circumpolar distributions of lanternfish using 2D and 3D ecological niche models, Marine Ecology Progress Series.

  • A Deep sediment trap (3200m) mooring has been deployed in the Southern Ocean, south-west of South Georgia during multiple marine cruises from April 2007 onwards as part of a long-term monitoring and assessment of the status of the marine ecosystems in the region of South Georgia. Measurements were made for sustained observations of zooplankton densities, carbon export and effects of ocean acidification. Standard datasets include profiles from a Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) analyser and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). In addition, data from a deep and shallow sediment trap, current meter, O2 sensor, CO2 sensor and pH sensors were collected. Funding was provided by the Scotia Sea open-ocean observatory (SCOOBIES) project. Data Access is provided via the RELATED DATA SET METADATA links.

  • Datasets from a deep sediment trap (3700m) mooring deployed in the Southern Ocean, north-west of South Georgia in December 2014 during the marine cruise JR304 and recovered in November 2015 by the marine cruise JR15002.

  • A Deep sediment trap (3700m) mooring has been deployed in the Southern Ocean, north-west of South Georgia during multiple marine cruises from November 2006 onwards as part of a long-term monitoring and assessment of the status of the marine ecosystems in the region of South Georgia. Measurements were made for sustained observations of zooplankton densities, carbon export and effects of ocean acidification. Standard datasets include profiles from a Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) analyser and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). In addition, data from a deep and shallow sediment trap, current meter, O2 sensor, CO2 sensor and pH sensors were collected. Funding was provided by the Scotia Sea open-ocean observatory (SCOOBIES) project. Data Access is provided via the RELATED DATA SET METADATA links.

  • Datasets from a deep sediment trap (3200m) mooring deployed in the Southern Ocean, south-west of South Georgia in November 2014 during the marine cruise JR304 and recovered in November 2015 by the marine cruise JR15002.

  • Samples of snow, sea ice, seawater (0.5 m and 5 m depths) and meltponds were collected from two ice-covered stations located in the Barents Sea (81 N), during the "Nansen Legacy Q3" summer cruise of the Norwegian research vessel Kronprins Haakon on 26-28 August 2019. Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) concentrations, salinity and stable oxygen isotopes were measured in all samples to determine sources and environmental fate of PFAS during late summer. NERC ENVISION Doctoral Training Centre (NE/L002604/1). NERC and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) funded Changing Arctic Ocean program EISPAC project (NE/R012857/1). The Nansen Legacy research is funded by the Research Council of Norway (# 276730).