From 1 - 10 / 106
  • Temperature data were collected from a tidepool at Rothera Point, Antarctica every two minutes from February 1999 to May 2000, with the aim of documenting tidal, diurnal and seasonal variability.

  • The data include size, sex, location and morphological measurements and of Muraenolepis specimens included in Fitzcharles et al. (2021). The morphometric data were primarily collected from fish captured during South Georgia Groundfish Surveys in 2003, 2004 and 2005, with additional data obtained from type specimens and extracted from published descriptions of Muraenolepididae. For genetic studies, tissue samples from the South Georgia specimens were supplemented by additional tissue samples from Muraenolepis in other parts of the Southern Ocean. Source, location and depth of capture are included for all specimens that were sequenced, together with sequence Accession Numbers (to the DNA Database of Japan) for Cox 1 and 16S rRNA sequences. The work was primarily funded by the Government of South Georgia & the South Sandwich Islands and was a component part of Elaine Fitzcharles'' PhD (University of St Andrews).

  • Marine debris washed up on beaches on Goudier Island has been recorded since 2014. Surveys are conducted on a monthly basis when the station is occupied during the summer season. This data contributes to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) Marine Debris programme.

  • This dataset contains reflectance spectra measurements of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) that were sampled from the Scotia Sea in the Southern Ocean. Reflectance measurements were made on board on freshly caught krill, using a spectroradiometer. A number of these reflectance experiments were carried out across different regions of the Scotia Sea, on male, female and juvenile krill. Reflectance measurements are given for krill in both in situ and filtered seawater, as well as for water without krill. Data are presented in terms of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs). Funding for the work was primarily through a bursary awarded to Anna Belcher from Antarctic Science Ltd. Additionally, funding from the BAS ecosystems programme supported the project. The Natural Environment Research Council Field Spectroscopy Facility (NERC FSF) loaned the equipment required to carry out this research.

  • In-situ underwater images were gathered during the expedition JR17003a of RRS James Clark Ross to the eastern Antarctic Peninsula in March 2018. The BAS'' Shallow Underwater Camera System (SUCS) has been used to estimate faunal density, biomass and species abundance of the benthos and to provide an overview of the conditions of the underwater landscape. Funding was provided by NERC urgency grant NE/R012296/1 ''Benthic biodiversity under Antarctic ice-shelves - baseline assessment of the seabed exposed by the 2017 calving of the Larsen-C Ice Shelf''.

  • Water column acoustic data collected in the Scotia Sea (from 2010-12-22 to 2011-01-18) during cruise JR245. Multi-frequency (38,120 and 200 kHz) acoustic data were collected using a Simrad EK60 echo sounder. The dataset comprises of calibrated and processed 38 kHz volume backscattering strength (Sv, dB re 1m-1). Data processing was undertaken using Echoview and Matlab. Processed netCDF data files are made available as part of the NERC Southern Ocean Network of Acoustics (SONA) and the EU MESOPP project.

  • Water column acoustic data collected in the Scotia Sea (from 2008-04-16 to 2008-04-17) during cruise JR186. Multi-frequency (38,120 and 200 kHz) acoustic data were collected using a Simrad EK60 echo sounder. The dataset comprises of calibrated and processed 38 kHz volume backscattering strength (Sv, dB re 1m-1). Data processing was undertaken using Echoview and Matlab. Processed netCDF data files are made available as part of the NERC Southern Ocean Network of Acoustics (SONA) and the EU MESOPP project.

  • In 2018 RRS James Clark Ross investigated the marine benthic biodiversity of the Prince Gustav Channel area and the macrobenthic molluscan fauna collected by epibenthic sledge (EBS) has been assessed for species richness, abundance and assemblage composition as well as for functional traits. In total 20,307 mollusc specimens assigned to 50 morphospecies and 4 classes (Solenogastres, Bivalvia, Gastropoda and Scaphopoda) were identified. Assemblage analyses across the Prince Gustav Channel area did not show apparent pattern or separation across depth, taxon or station. To set the bivalve dataset into a wider context, unpublished bivalve species richness and abundance data from EBS collected stations in the area influenced by the Weddell Gyre were added. This doi dataset provides data for 1) PGC EBS locations, 2) PGC EBS molluscan abundances, 3) PGC molluscan functional traits, 4) Weddell Gyre EBS stations (300 - 2000 m depth), 5) Weddell Gyre EBS bivalve standardised 1000 m trawl length abundances (300 - 2000 m depth). Funding was provided by NERC urgency grant NE/R012296/1 ''Benthic biodiversity under Antarctic ice-shelves - baseline assessment of the seabed exposed by the 2017 calving of the Larsen-C Ice Shelf''.

  • This dataset compiles fish length and weight measurements from the RMT-25 net hauls carried out on Discovery 2010 cruises (JR161, JR177, JR200) in the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean in spring 2006, summer 2008, and autumn 2009. The dataset comprises of the station net hauls only. Research cruises were led by British Antarctic Survey aboard the RRS James Clark Ross. Net hauls were conducted along a transect from the Antarctic Polar Front to the sea ice zone in the Scotia Sea. Hauls included in this dataset are depth stratified (1000-700 m, 700-400 m, 400-200 m, 200 m to surface). Individual fish lengths, and weights were measured on board. Where weights were not measured, length-weight regressions have been used to estimate fish weight. This data set accompanies the paper by Belcher et al. in Marine Ecology Progress Series, titled, Respiration rates and active carbon flux of mesopelagic fishes (Family Myctophidae) in the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean.

  • In 2008 RRS James Clark Ross investigated the marine benthic biodiversity in Amundsen Sea and in 2018 the marine benthic biodiversity of the Prince Gustav Channel (PGC) area and the macrobenthic cumacean fauna (Peracarida, Crustacea) collected by epibenthic sledge (EBS) has been assessed for species richness, abundance and assemblage composition. In total 4431 cumacean specimens assigned to 58 morphospecies and 5 families were identified. To set the cumacean dataset into a wider context, published cumacean species richness and abundance data from EBS collected stations in the Magellan Region and Southern Ocean (Rehm et al 2007, Muehlenhardt-Siegel 1999, Cordoba & San Vincente 2009) were added. This dataset provides data for 1) Amundsen Sea and PGC EBS locations, 2) Amundsen Sea and PGC EBS cumacean abundances, 3) Magellan Region and Southern Ocean EBS cumacean standardised 1000 m trawl length abundances (175 - 3500 m depth). Funding for the expeditions and KL was provided by NERC NC Science for the BAS core project BIOPEARL and for NERC urgency grant NE/R012296/1 ''Benthic biodiversity under Antarctic ice-shelves - baseline assessment of the seabed exposed by the 2017 calving of the Larsen-C Ice Shelf''. Funding for DD was provided by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft grant Br1121/51-1.