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EARTH SCIENCE > Cryosphere > Glaciers/Ice Sheets > Glacier Mass Balance/Ice Sheet Mass Balance

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  • Surface melt onset, duration and end date for the Antarctic Peninsula from 1999/2000 to 2016/2017 at a spatial resolution of 2 km, derived from scatterometer data. Years 1999/2000 to 2008/09 are based on QSCAT data and 2009/10 to 2016/17 on ASCAT data. This work was funded by NERC grant NE/L006065/1.

  • From May 2009 to May 2013, seven dual-frequency GPS receivers were deployed along a 120 km-long transect in the south-west of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Two additional dual-frequency GPS receivers were deployed perpendicular to longitudinal ice flow at ~14 km inland: one 5 km distant from June 2011 to May 2013, and another 2.5 km distance from May 2012 to May 2013. Each receiver recorded position observations every 10 seconds or 30 seconds (depending on configuration), enabling resolution of horizontal and vertical ice motion. Sites were powered by solar panels and operated 24 hours a day during summer but shut down in the autumn. Absolute ice displacements at each site were obtained for each summer and winter period in the absence of continuous measurements. Position measurements were kinematically corrected relative to an off-ice base station using TRACK (Chen, 1999). Daily velocities were then obtained by differencing across 24-hour periods, whilst continuous velocities were obtained through application of a sliding 6-hour differencing window. At each GPS site we also measured (1) the near-surface air temperature every 15 minutes year-round, (2) net seasonal ablation using ablation stakes, and (3) at several selected sites melt rates using sonic ranging sensors. This version 2 of the dataset updates the previously 2-day temporal resolution of the ice motion records to 1-day resolution. In other respects the dataset has not changed. Funded by NERC, the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland and The University of Edinburgh. Relevant grants: NE/F021399/1, NE/H024964/1 Studentships: NE/I52830X/1, NE/J500021/1, NE/H526794/1

  • From May 2009 to May 2013, seven dual-frequency GPS receivers were deployed along a 120 km-long transect in the south-west of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Two additional dual-frequency GPS receivers were deployed perpendicular to longitudinal ice flow at ~14 km inland: one 5 km distant from June 2011 to May 2013, and another 2.5 km distance from May 2012 to May 2013. Each receiver recorded position observations every 10 seconds or 30 seconds (depending on configuration), enabling resolution of horizontal and vertical ice motion. Sites were powered by solar panels and operated 24 hours a day during summer but shut down in the autumn. Absolute ice displacements at each site were obtained for each summer and winter period in the absence of continuous measurements. Position measurements were kinematically corrected relative to an off-ice base station using TRACK (Chen, 1999). Daily velocities were then obtained by differencing across 24-hour periods, whilst continuous velocities were obtained through application of a sliding 6-hour differencing window. At each GPS site we also measured (1) the near-surface air temperature every 15 minutes year-round, (2) net seasonal ablation using ablation stakes, and (3) at several selected sites melt rates using sonic ranging sensors. Funded by NERC, the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland and The University of Edinburgh. Relevant grants: NE/F021399/1, NE/H024964/1 Studentships: NE/I52830X/1, NE/J500021/1, NE/H526794/1

  • The basal melt rate at a single location beneath Pine Island Ice Shelf was observed using an autonomous phase-sensitive radio echo-sounder (ApRES) during 2014. The ApRES was deployed approximately 10 km from the ice shelf front where the ice was 492 m thick and the ice shelf draft was approximately 422 m. The ApRES was deployed as part of the NERC Ice Sheet Stability Program (iStar). Funding was provided by the NERC Ice Sheet Stability Research Program.

  • Three datasets of melt season duration in days covering the Antarctic Peninsula for the austral yeas of 2017/2018, 2018/2019 and 2019/2020. The datasets are based on ASCAT GDS Level 1 Sigma0 Swath Grid data from the EUMETSAT archive (archive.eumetsat.int/usc/) and extend an earlier time series based on enhanced QuikSCAT and ASCAT data (doi:10.5285/e3616d28-759e-4cca-8fae-fe398f9552ba). The data are supplied as GeoTIFFs. Funding was provided from the NERC grant NE/L005409/1.

  • Daily outputs on a 7.5 km horizontal resolution grid covering the Greenland Ice Sheet from MARv3.6.2, which is a regional climate model developed for the Polar regions that solves the regional climate and ice sheet surface mass balance. MAR was forced by ERA-Interim re-analysis data.

  • Dual-frequency GPS data from a single receiver installed on the surface of Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The instrument was operated from late 2004 to early 2007. Gaps in the data set occur, through periods of power loss in the winters and during station relocations. Funding was provided by NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI) GR3/G005, NERC under the British Antarctic Survey National Capability programme, Polar Science for Planet Earth, Leverhulme Trust Fellowship (to T Murray), and RCUK Academic Fellowship (to M A King).

  • During the 2014/2015 season six temporary GNSS stations were deployed on rocky outcrops west of the former Larsen B ice shelf by the University of Leeds and BAS, in the region of the Flask and Leppard Glaciers. This was carried out as part of the NERC funded UKANET project. This is an area we have targeted with a space-based technique called radar interferometry (InSAR), which can provide dense measurements of uplift rates, and the temporary GNSS network were deployed to better understand the contribution of atmospheric noise to the InSAR results. Four were taken out in the same season, while the other two were pulled in the 2015/2016 season. Funding was provided by NERC grant NE/L006065/1.

  • The flow-line model was designed to enable estimation of the age and surface origin for various ice bodies identified within hot-water drilled boreholes on Larsen C Ice Shelf. Surface fluxes are accumulated, converted to thicknesses, and advected down flow from a fixed number of selected points. The model requires input datasets of surface mass balance, surface velocity, vertical strain rates, ice-shelf thickness, and a vertical density profile. This model is part of a larger project. Input datasets such as density profiles and trajectory vectors are available separately. Resolution is dependent on the input datasets. Funding was provided by the NERC grant NE/L005409/1.

  • A dataset of ice-margin change (advance/recession) at the south-western sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet, comprising data from 3325 terrestrial, 439 lacustrine and 35 marine ice-margins respectively. The dataset also comprises measures of ice-marginal lake parameters including area and intersect (length of the lake - ice-margin interface). Measurements were made at approximately five year intervals (epochs) from 1987 to 2015. The ice sheet margin and adjacent ice-marginal lakes were delineated by applying the Normalised Difference Snow Index (NDSI) and the Normalised Difference Water Index (NDWI) respectively to Landsat TM, ETM+ and OLI scenes. Ice-margin changes were measured relative to a series of fixed reference points. The dataset was generated to facilitate comparison of changes at the disparate ice-marginal environments of the ice sheet and investigate temporal patterns of ice-margin recession. The dataset was created and processed by researchers in the School of Geography at the University of Leeds and the Institute of Integrative Biology at the University of Liverpool.