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  • Eight Antarctic Fur seal rookeries near King Edward Point on South Georgia have been monitored since 2008. The colonies (Burnet1, Burnet2, Burnet2, Little, Poa1, Poa2, Poa3 and Tortula) are surveyed frequently between November and January. The number of males, females, pups and juveniles are recorded. Data is also summarised as max count per season for males, females pups and juveniles, and first pup date. This work was funded by Natural Environment Research Council (UK) core funding to the British Antarctic Survey.

  • Nests of Light-mantled Albatrosses (Phoebetria palpebrata) throughout a study area on Bird Island have been monitored annually since 2000, with surveys in November, January and May. The number of nests, eggs and chicks are counted and from this, yearly breeding success is calculated.

  • The number of Fur and Elephant seals around the base on Signy Island have been counted daily between January and March since 1992. Details of the area counted are given in the 1992 Seal Mammal report (AD6/2H/1992/NM3).

  • Since 2009, the weights of male and female Antarctic Fur Seal pups from the Maiviken area on South Georgia have been monitored. 100 pups are randomly sampled from two areas, tussock and beach, at the start of January, February and March. This work was funded by Natural Environment Research Council (UK) core funding to the British Antarctic Survey.

  • Several populations of Northern (Macronectes halli) and Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) at South Georgia have been monitored since 2014. Three colonies of Northern Giant Petrel are monitored at Greene Peninsula, Discovery Point and Maiviken, and two of Southern Giant Petrel at Greene Peninsula and Harpon Bay. Summary data on breeding numbers and productivity for each season and colony are available, based on data from individual nests.

  • The total number of seals on Signy Island is counted in February each year. The island is divided into 6 areas, sub-divided into 105 zones and the number of Antarctic Fur seals, Elephant seals, Weddell seals and other seal species in each zone is counted typically over a two day period. For Fur seals the number of pups, white seals and entangled seals are also recorded. The first recorded count was conducted in 1974 and counts have been done annually since 1985.

  • The soil food webs in this collection represent seven belowground communities from native and agricultural soils. The seven communities are from experimental research sites in the USA, Sweden and the Netherlands. The Jacobians of the seven food webs were calculated by de Ruiter et al. (1995) using the empirical biomass data of the respective systems, and inferring steady-state biomass flow data using a procedure described by Hunt et al. (1987), see further references below. The Jacobians represent the interaction strengths of the species in the two food webs, evaluated at equilibrium.

  • The soil food webs in this collection represent a total of 32 belowground communities studied by Neutel et al. (2007), from two natural successions in sandy dune soils: one on the Waddensea Island of Schiermonnikoog in the north of the Netherlands and the other at Hulshorsterzand, on the Veluwe, in the central Netherlands. The study sites, which constitute the two gradients, represent four consecutive stages in chronosequences of early primary vegetation succession, increasing in aboveground and below-ground productivity. The Jacobians of the 32 food webs (two series, four stages with four replicates per stage) were calculated by Neutel et al. (2007) from observed average biomass data of the respective systems, and inferring steady-state biomass flow data using a procedure described by Hunt et al. (1987). The Jacobians represent the interaction strengths of the species in the two food webs, evaluated at equilibrium.

  • The Antarctic food webs represent two entire above-belowground communities from Signy Island Reference Sites on Signy Island, one of the South Orkney Islands in the Maritime Antarctic. The two communities are a dry moss community (Antarctic dry tundra) and a wet moss community (Antarctic wet tundra). These two communities were the focus of intensive biological study by personnel from the British Antarctic Survey over the course of a decade in the 1970''s, of which the results were finally compiled into a meta-analysis by Davis (1981). The Jacobians of the dry and wet tundra were calculated by Neutel and Thorne (2014) using the empirical biomass and flow data of the respective systems from Davis'' analysis. The Jacobians represent the interaction strengths of the species in the two food webs, evaluated at equilibrium.

  • Brown Skuas (Stercorarius [antarcticus] lonnbergi) on Bird Island have been monitored in a standardised study area since 2011. Data on ringed birds, nest locations, number and size of eggs, number and mass of chicks as well as non-breeders resightings and productivity data are recorded.