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  • Eight Antarctic Fur seal rookeries near King Edward Point on South Georgia have been monitored since 2008. The colonies (Burnet1, Burnet2, Burnet2, Little, Poa1, Poa2, Poa3 and Tortula) are surveyed frequently between November and January. The number of males, females, pups and juveniles are recorded. Data is also summarised as max count per season for males, females pups and juveniles, and first pup date. This work was funded by Natural Environment Research Council (UK) core funding to the British Antarctic Survey.

  • Incidences of Antarctic Fur Seals entangled in man-made debris have been recorded at Bird Island since 1988. The majority of entanglements have been Antarctic Fur Seals caught in plastic packaging bands, synthetic line and fishing nets. Where possible these are removed by scientists working at the research base. This data is collected as part of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources''s Ecosystem Monitoring Program (CEMP).

  • Platform Transmitting Terminal (PTT) tags were used to track Antarctic Fur Seals (Arctocephalus gazella) from Bird Island, South Georgia, 1995-2010. PTT tags use the ARGOS satellite system to collect geospatial data. Tags were deployed on breeding females during the summer, to provide information on where the seals are foraging during lactation and into the winter months.

  • Incidences of Antarctic Fur Seals entangled in man-made debris have been recorded since 2008 at Grytviken, South Georgia. The majority of entanglements have been Antarctic Fur Seals caught in plastic packaging bands, synthetic line and fishing nets. Where possible these are removed by scientists working at the research base. This data is collected as part of CCAMLR''s Marine Debris Programme.

  • The number of Fur and Elephant seals around the base on Signy Island have been counted daily between January and March since 1992. Details of the area counted are given in the 1992 Seal Mammal report (AD6/2H/1992/NM3).

  • Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) diet has been monitored at the King Edward Point research station on South Georgia since 2008. Scats are collected regularly and krill carapaces, fish otoliths and squid beaks extracted. Krill length is calculated from the extracted carapaces whilst squid beaks and fish otoliths are measured and identified to species where possible. This dataset comprises raw and processed krill length as well as squid beak and otolith measurements and identification to species where appropriate.

  • Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) diet has been monitored at Bird Island since 1989. Scats are collected regularly and krill carapaces, fish otoliths and squid beaks extracted. Krill length is calculated from the extracted carapaces whilst squid beaks and fish otoliths are measured and identified to species where possible. This dataset comprises raw and processed krill length as well as squid beak and otolith measurements and identification to species where appropriate.

  • Since 1978, female Antarctic Fur Seal foraging trip duration has been monitored on Bird Island, South Georgia. Each year 20 female Fur Seals are tagged with a VHF transmitter. Disruptions to the transmitter''s signal indicate the seal is at sea and thus foraging trip time can be calculated. Data is available for individual seals as well as average, minimum and maximum trip times for each season. This data is collected as part of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources''s Marine Debris Programme (CCAMLR CEMP).

  • The total number of seals on Signy Island is counted in February each year. The island is divided into 6 areas, sub-divided into 105 zones and the number of Antarctic Fur seals, Elephant seals, Weddell seals and other seal species in each zone is counted typically over a two day period. For Fur seals the number of pups, white seals and entangled seals are also recorded. The first recorded count was conducted in 1974 and counts have been done annually since 1985.