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  • The dataset comprises of site data and multiproxy analyses of LP08 lake sediment cores extracted from Lago Pato, a small lake basin at -51.3003, -72.6786 and approx 33 m a.s.l., which is topographically separated from Lago del Toro in Torres del Paine (TdP). The data are used to constrain glacier dynamics and lake level change in the TdP and Ultima Esperanza region over the last approx 30,000 cal a BP (30 ka). Data for the LP08 sediment record consist of downcore measurements of biology, chronology, geochemistry, sedimentology proxy data collected from the current depocentre between November 2007 to March 2008. This project was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) through the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and an UGent BOF bilateral collaboration project. RMcC was supported by Programa Regional R17A10002 and R20F0002 (PATSER) ANID. We gratefully acknowledge the University of Magallanes (UMAG) and the University of Santiago (Carolina Diaz) for assistance with fieldwork; the NERC/SUERC AMS Radiocarbon Facility for providing initial range-finder radiocarbon dates; the NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory (NIGL, now National Environmental Isotope Facility, NEIF, at the British Geological Survey) and Melanie Lang for stable carbon isotope analysis; Aberystwyth University (David Kelly), Durham University (Neil Tunstall and Christopher Longley) and Edinburgh University (Chris Hayward) for use of their core scanning and microprobe facilities and technical support.

  • The dataset comprises of GPS site data, bathymetric data from Lago Pato, a small lake basin at 51.3003 S, 72.6786 W and approx 33 m a.s.l., water chemistry collected from lakes in the region made in 2007 and precipitation data generated from the ERA-INTERIM model for Lago Pato. The data are used to help constrain glacier dynamics and lake level change in the TdP and Ultima Esperanza region over the last approx 30,000 cal a BP (30 ka). This project was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) through the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and an UGent BOF bilateral collaboration project. RMcC was supported by Programa Regional R17A10002 and R20F0002 (PATSER) ANID. We gratefully acknowledge the University of Magallanes (UMAG) and the University of Santiago (Carolina Diaz) for assistance with fieldwork; the NERC/SUERC AMS Radiocarbon Facility for providing initial range-finder radiocarbon dates; the NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory (NIGL, now National Environmental Isotope Facility, NEIF, at the British Geological Survey) and Melanie Lang for stable carbon isotope analysis; Aberystwyth University (David Kelly), Durham University (Neil Tunstall and Christopher Longley) and Edinburgh University (Chris Hayward) for use of their core scanning and microprobe facilities and technical support.

  • The dataset comprises of sedimentological, geochemical, biological and chronological data from a sediment core record extracted from Kiteschsee Lake sediment, Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland Islands. We undertook multi-proxy analyses (diatom, grain size, geochemical and sedimentological) on a 77 cm-long sediment record extracted from the flat-bottomed eastern basin depocentre of Kiteschsee Lake and compared data obtained with published lake records from the Fildes Peninsula. Data collected in this study were funded by: Centro de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Tierra (CICTERRA), the Direccion Nacional del Antartico/Instituto Antartico Argentino (DNA/IAA) in the framework of the Project PICTA, 2011 - 0102, IAA "Geomorfologia y Geologia Glaciar del Archipielago James Ross e Islas Shetland del Sur, Sector Norte de la Peninsula Antartica"; the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) research program Polar regions and Coasts in a changing Earth System (PACES II); IMCONet (FP7 IRSES, action no. 318718); the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC/BAS-CGS Grant no.81); the NERC/BAS science programmes CACHE-PEP: Natural climate variability - extending the Americas palaeoclimate transect through the Antarctic Peninsula to the pole and GRADES-QWAD: Quaternary West Antarctic Deglaciations. We thank the crews of the Argentine research station "Carlini" and the adjoined German Dallmann-Labor (AWI) Laboratory, the Uruguayan research station "Artigas", the Russian Bellingshausen Station, the Chinese Great Wall Station, Base Presidente Eduardo Frei Montalva, the Brazilian Navy Almirante Maximiano, the UK Navy HMS Endurance and NERC/BAS James Clark Ross for logistical support during the 2006, 2011, 2014 and 2015 field seasons.

  • 200+ erratic and bedrock samples were collected for cosmogenic isotope analysis, as well as several depth profiles of tills. Samples were collected from 11 sites along a 350km transect stretching from Pirrit Hills in the south to the ridge between Mt Bentley and Mt Hubley in the north. Most sites were on the western (West Antarctic Ice Sheet) side of the range but includes Flowers Hills on the east side of the range, adjacent to the Rutford Ice Stream. Throughout, the emphasis was on taking samples to allow dating of any changes in ice altitude/extent.

  • Ice sheet model runs based on the Glimmer thermo-mechanical ice sheet model. Glacial modelling was used to simulate former WAIS (West Antarctic Ice Sheet) dynamics (specifically grounding line and ice volume changes) in the Weddell Sea embayment, constrained by newly acquired field data (see related datasets).

  • Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measurements of cosmogenic isotopes were made from erratic and bedrock samples collected in the Ellsworth Mountains, 2005-2006. Pressed AMS targets were analysed at SUERC (Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre) to yield exposure ages.

  • Glacial geomorphological data from the Ellsworth Mountains, Weddell Sea embayment. Satellite imagery and aerial photography, ground truthing, surveying and GPS traverses were used for geomorphological mapping. Additional photographic and weathering data were used to complement the field work. The project resulted in one of the most detailed geomorphological studies of any part of the WAIS (West Antarctic Ice Sheet), as well as the most comprehensive coverage for cosmogenic isotope analysis.

  • Powders, solutions and residues related to erratic and bedrock samples collected in the Ellsworth Mountains during the 2005-2006 field season. For each of the rock samples analysed in the lab, a (variable) number of laboratory stages are created, including sawing and crushing residues, pure quartz separates, chemical solutions, and AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) targets.