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  • A very incomplete dataset of surface lakes in Antarctica. Data have been prepared from various map and remotely sensed datasets. This dataset has been generalised from the high resolution version.

  • A very incomplete dataset of surface lakes in Antarctica. Data have been prepared from various map and remotely sensed datasets.

  • Fieldwork was undertaken at Blaso epishelf lake, Northeast Greenland between 19th July and 11th August 2017. Tidal variation was measured using a water pressure transducer between the 24th July to 8th August 2017. The tidal measurements are therefore presented as three measurement intervals: Interval 1 (25th July - 29th July), Interval 2 (29th July - 2nd August), and Interval 3 (2nd August - 12th August). This project was funded by NERC Standard Grant NE/N011228/1.

  • A very incomplete dataset of surface lakes in Antarctica. Data have been prepared from various map and remotely sensed datasets. This dataset has been generalised from the high resolution version.

  • A very incomplete dataset of surface lakes in Antarctica. Data have been prepared from various map and remotely sensed datasets.

  • A geographic database of lakes on the Antarctic Peninsula compiled over the past five years from a number of information sources: satellite images, aerial photography, old maps and reports. The database fields include: Lake unique id; Name; location; imager reference/how identified; locality; size (longest axis); area; type (as per Hutchinson''s lake classification); reference - any existing scientific work on the lake; salinity; depth; x co-ordinate; y co-ordinate. Many of the lakes are previously unknown, and very few have been studied before. The list represents the first attempt to collate all the lakes in the area into one usable dataset. The data is available as a down-loadable text file with point co-ordinates, or as a polygon coverage downloadable from the Antarctic Digital database.

  • These datasets show how lake water-pressure fluctuated through time over several months in seasonally-frozen catchments in winter. These catchments were in three settings: the lowland Finnish Arctic, an alpine valley and a high cirque in Switzerland. The water-pressure data are accompanied by water temperature and (except for Orajarvi), ground temperature for the same periods. Together, they were used to detect and quantify the water content of snow falling on the lake surfaces. The locations, method of data collection and analysis and the results are described in detail in Pritchard, H. D., Farinotti, D., & Colwell, S. (2021). This work was funded by Natural Environment Research Council (UK) core funding to the British Antarctic Survey, and a fellowship from the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL, CH-8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland.