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  • Field measurements collected from a open top chamber (OTC) warming experiment on Rothera Point, Adelaide Island. Data consist of (i) the percentage frequencies of fungal structures recorded in the tissues of the leafy liverwort Cephaloziella varians sampled from five control plots and five plots warmed with OTCs on six occasions between 16 February 2007 and 21 March 2017, (ii) temperatures of C. varians mat measured every 3 h between 17 February 2010 and 23 February 2011 in four control plots and four OTCs and (iii) moisture concentrations of C. varians mat measured on 11 January, 31 January, 14 February and 28 February 2014 in five control plots and five OTCs.

  • The dataset consists of the relative abundances of the DNA and RNA of a fungus in soil samples from Signy and Leonie Islands, along with physico-chemical parameters (moisture concentration, pH value, total carbon and nitrogen concentrations, delta-carbon-13 content, carbon-14 enrichment, and mean carbon residence time). Funding was provided by NERC grants NE/H014098/1 and NE/H014772/1 and NE/H01408X/1

  • Microscopy data on the percentages of liverwort stem length colonised by (i) stained hyphal coils, (ii) stained septate hyphae and (iii) dark septate hyphae, and (iv) percentages of rhizoids colonised by hyphae, in 16 leafy liverwort species sampled from sub-Antarctic South Georgia. Specimens were collected in 2011 and 2016 from 12 sites on the Thatcher Peninsula, South Georgia. The specimens have been deposited in the British Antarctic Survey herbarium. This project was funded by NERC under the British Antarctic Survey Long Term Monitoring programme.

  • This list provides a check-list of the non-lichenized fungi reported from Antarctica that have been published in the literature or deposited in major culture collections. The list includes all macrofungi, filamentous forms and yeasts, together with some members of the Chromista (Straminipila) that have historically been considered as fungi. This compilation excludes lichens, as these species have been extensively listed elsewhere. Primary source data are from the collections and records held in the Biological Sciences Division at British Antarctic Survey and the Mycology Section, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Secondary data is from publicly available specimen and culture collections and scientific literature. The list is part of an ongoing determination of the fungal diversity of the Antarctic region, and this version includes details of names, synonyms, taxonomy and at least one reference to an available record. Within these categories links are made between reported and current names, and all entries are bookmarked to individual references and citations. A details section is currently being developed to include hosts and substrates, this is very much a "work in progress" and is being regularly updated. Details on collection locations are also currently being added, and the information under region indicates at least whether the collection was from the Antarctic or sub-Antarctic , together with more information on location. These two fields will be expanded in the future.

  • Data on the growth rates and specific cellulase activities of 10 isolates of the fungus Pseudogymnoascus roseus from sub- and maritime Antarctica, exposed in vitro to fluctuating temperatures of 2-15 degrees Celsius, 2-18 degrees Celsius, 2-21 degrees Celsius and 2-24 degrees Celsius and their corresponding mean constant temperatures of 9.0 degrees Celsius, 10.7, 12.0 or 13.1 degrees Celsius, respectively, and constant temperatures of 2 degrees Celsius, 5.5 degrees Celsius, 8.5 degrees Celsius, 15.0 degrees Celsius, 18.0 degrees Celsius, 21.0 degrees Celsius and 24.0 degrees Celsius. Funding: UK Natural Environment Research Council (core funding to the British Antarctic Survey).

  • The majority of Antarctic lichens produce sexual organs, and in many species sexual ascospores appear to be the only reproductive propagule. However, it is unknown whether sexual reproduction involves selfing (homothallism) or outcrossing (heterothallism). To investigate this issue we have established axenic cultures of sexual progeny in order to generate DNA fingerprints and thereby determine the breeding system.

  • Data on the growth rates and specific cellulase activities of 10 isolates of the fungus Pseudogymnoascus roseus from sub- and maritime Antarctica, exposed in vitro to fluctuating temperatures of 2-15 degrees Celsius, 2-18 degrees Celsius, 2-21 degrees Celsius and 2-24 degrees Celsius and their constant mean temperatures of 9.0 degrees Celsius, 10.7, 12.0 or 13.1 degrees Celsius, respectively. The 10 isolates of P. roseus were obtained from soils at Lewis Pass on South Georgia, The Backslope on Signy Island, Walton Terraces on Leonie Island and Mars Oasis on Alexander Island. Funding: UK Natural Environment Research Council (core funding to the British Antarctic Survey). *** PLEASE BE ADVISED TO USE VERSION 2.0 OF THIS DATASET *** This dataset has been superseded by Version 2.0 (https://data.bas.ac.uk/full-record.php?id=GB/NERC/BAS/PDC/01807 - see ''Related Data Set Metadata'' link below). Version 2.0 has been updated to include additional data from a third experiment and to update the metadata accordingly

  • Microscopy data on the percentages of stem length colonised by (i) hyphal coils, (ii) stained septate hyphae and (iii) dark septate hyphae, and (iv) percentages of rhizoids colonised by hyphae, in 13 leafy liverwort species and two simple thalloid II liverwort species sampled from High Arctic Spitsbergen.

  • This dataset consists of field measurements of Pseudogymnoascus roseus DNA concentrations in soil and three edaphic factors (soil temperature, water potential and snow depth) at Mars Oasis, Alexander Island, from 2009 to 2012, under different temperature, irrigation and substrate (glucose, glycine and tryptone soy broth) treatments. Laboratory measurements of hyphal extension rates, conidial germination, numbers of conidia produced per colony of fungus and specific enzyme activities of three P. roseus isolates are also included.

  • Genetic variation on a spatial scale was assessed, using both DNA fingerprinting and sequencing-based approaches, in the Antarctic endemics Buellia frigida, Carbonia vorticosa and Amandinea petermananii, and in the bipolar species Caloplaca saxicola, Umbilicaria decussata and Cladonia galindezii. PCR-based (Polymerase Chain Reaction) molecular biology techniques, were used as they are ideal for working with lichens because little starting material is required. See Fabian et al. 2007 for further information on analyses and results.