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  • The use of automated systems to record the identity of individual penguins and their movements in and out of a colony can provide an effective means of studying penguin biology remotely. In 2002 an automatic gateway was installed at the only access point to the Macaroni Penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus) colony at Fairy Point, Bird Island. Taking advantage of the colony''s geography, which ensured that the birds have only one route between the colony and the sea, the gateway initially recorded bird identities from implanted radio frequency identification transponders (RFID tags). In 2009 a weighbridge was installed which records the weight of each bird and the direction of travel and from 2011 onwards the two systems, RFID antenna and weighbridge, were built into the same unit meaning it was now possible to confidently match the crossing data with bird identities.

  • Monitoring of Wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans) nests on Bird Island began in 1958. It was carried out sporadically until 1976 when annual monitoring, including nest counts and estimations of breeding success, began in earnest. There are 25 defined areas on the island, and the number of nests has been recorded in each area since 1976. Additionally, from 1989, the hatching and breeding success has been monitored.

  • Geolocators (GLS) were attached to northern rockhopper penguins breeding on Nightingale Island (37 deg 25 S, 12 deg 28 W: 4 km2) with the aim to study the species'' dispersal in the inter-breeding period, 2017. This data successfully augmented and complemented existing datasets for the species breeding on Nightingale Island and enhanced our understanding of the species'' distribution at sea throughout their annual cycle. There are four different data types for each penguin a) the unprocessed light sensor data, b) the unprocessed activity (wet/dry) data, c) the unprocessed temperature data and d) the estimated positions using the BAStag and SGAT packages in R. Data were collected as part of the Darwin Plus funded Project Pinnamin, 2016 - 2018.

  • Global Positioning System (GPS Pathrack) data loggers were attached to breeding northern rockhopper penguins during incubation, guard and creche stages between September to December 2016 on Nightingale (37 deg 25''S, 12 deg 28''W; 4 km2) and Inaccessible (37 deg 17''S, 12 deg 40''W; 14 km2) islands. Tracking data successfully augmented and complement existing data sets for the species breeding in the South Atlantic, which enable us to systematically identify areas of particular relevance for this species and thus to help determining whether there is a need to improve marine spatial planning in form of e.g. Marine Protected Areas in the island''s EEZ. There are two data types for each penguin a) the unprocessed raw and b) the processed GPS data (details below). All files are in the CSV format. Data were collected as part of the Darwin Plus funded Project Pinnamin, 2016 - 2018.

  • Platform Transmitting Terminal (PTT) tags have been used to track Macaroni Penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) and Gentoo Penguins (Pygoscelis papua) from Bird Island, South Georgia, since 1998. PTT tags use the ARGOS satellite system to collect geospatial data. These tags are deployed on a project-by-project basis and so data are not available for every year. Tags are generally deployed during the summer season, however, some winter data are available.

  • Platform Transmitting Terminal (PTT) tags have been used to track Macaroni Penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus), Gentoo Penguins (Pygoscelis papua) and King Penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) from South Georgia since 2004. PTT tags use the ARGOS satellite system to collect geospatial data. These tags are deployed on a project-by-project basis and so data are not available for every year. Included in the dataset is data from females recorded during long, post-laying foraging periods as well as from fledged birds.

  • The presence of marine debris and other material from human activity within bird colonies on Bird Island has been recorded since 1992. Bird colonies on the Island are regulary monitored for the presence of debris as part of CCAMLR''s Marine Debris Program. Debris can be found within the colonies, entangling the birds, or within diet samples. Where possible, all debris are removed. The date of survey, debris type and debris dimensions are recorded. This data is submitted to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) as part of their Marine Debris Programme.

  • Temperature depth devices (TDR) were attached to northern rockhopper penguins breeding on Nightingale (37 deg 25''S, 12 deg 28''W) to investigate temporal differences in diving behaviour throughout the species'' breeding cycle. The data sets comprise the unprocessed pressure and temperature data for each bird in .csv format. Data were collected as part of the Darwin Plus funded Project Pinnamin, 2016 - 2018.

  • Three hundred adult northern rockhopper penguins, Eudyptes moseleyi, and 100 chicks were implanted with PIT tags in the breeding season 2016/17, and 130 adults in 2017/18 on Nightingale (37 deg 25''S, 12 deg 28''W). To monitor annual survival two automated PIT readers were installed on each of the main pathways penguins use to commute between the sea and their colonies. There are two files comprising a) the list of PIT tags implanted and b) the reader crossings during from September 2016 to January 2018. Data were collected as part of the Darwin Plus funded Project Pinnamin, 2016 - 2018.

  • The diets of Grey-headed Albatross (Thalassarche chrysostoma) and Black-browed Albatross (Diomedea melanophris) have been monitored on Bird Island since 1986. This dataset comprises data on composition of diet samples (crustaceans, cephalopod and fish) and measurements of krill carapaces, fish otoliths and squid beaks found in the samples. These measurements are used to estimate the length and weight of krill, fish and squid that have been consumed.