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  • The data set comprises high-time resolution meteor wind velocity data from the southern hemisphere Falkland Islands radar (FIR), part of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). The velocities are line-of-sight velocities aligned in the geographic meridional direction (from FIR beam 6, range gate 4). The data cover the interval from 2010 to 2011 inclusive. Funding was provided by BAS national capability funding. NERC grant NE/R016038/1 - National Capability - Polar Expertise Supporting UK Research.

  • Temperature, pressure, wind speed and wind direction from two automatic weather stations on the Brunt Ice Shelf that operated during 2015.

  • High-resolution simulations of near-surface (1.5 m) temperature and (10 m) zonal and meridional winds over the Brunt Ice Shelf in the Antarctic for the year 2015 were conducted using the atmosphere-only Met Office Unified Model by the British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK. The datasets produced were necessary to place point meteorological measurements from the various automatic weather stations on the Brunt Ice Shelf into a wider spatial context by identifying spatial temperature gradients and investigating how such gradients may have affected the homogeneity of the composite Halley temperature record. The work formed part of the core science undertaken at the British Antarctic Survey.

  • Firstly, simulations of surface pressure, 10 m zonal wind speed, 10 m meridional wind speed, 1.5 m air temperature, and 1.5 m specific humidity over the Larsen C Ice Shelf for the duration of the OFCAP (Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula) field campaign from 8 January 2011 to 8 February 2011 were conducted using the regional atmosphere-only configuration of the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) at 4 km grid spacing by the British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK. The datasets produced were necessary to compare with corresponding measurements derived from five Automatic Weather Stations (AWSs) distributed across the Larsen C Ice Shelf to evaluate the main biases in the simulations. Secondly, further MetUM simulations at grid spacings of 1.5 and 0.5 km of a foehn wind event that occurred on 27 January 2011 were conducted, with the datasets produced used to compare results at 4, 1.5 and 0.5 km grid spacing and examine whether the added benefit of sub-kilometre scale grid spacing improves the model representation of foehn winds. Thirdly, a simulation of the foehn wind event on 27 January 2011 using the MetUM at 4 km grid spacing but replacing the ''sharp'' stability function used by the boundary layer scheme with the ''long-tail'' stability function were also conducted, with the dataset produced used to examine the impact of stronger turbulent mixing for statically stable conditions on the model representation of foehn winds. Funding was provided by NERC grant NE/G014124/1.

  • Daily outputs on a 7.5 km horizontal resolution grid covering the Greenland Ice Sheet from MARv3.6.2, which is a regional climate model developed for the Polar regions that solves the regional climate and ice sheet surface mass balance. MAR was forced by ERA-Interim re-analysis data.

  • READER (REference Antarctic Data for Environmental Research) is a project of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR http://www.scar.org/) and has the goal of creating a high quality, long term dataset of mean surface and upper air meteorological measurements from in-situ Antarctic observing systems. These data will be of value in climate research and climate change investigations. The primary sources of data are the Antarctic research stations and automatic weather stations. Data from mobile platforms, such as ships and drifting buoys are not being collected since our goal is to derive time series of data at fixed locations. Surface and upper air data are being collected and the principal statistics derived are monthly and annual means. Daily data will not be provided in order to keep the data set to a manageable size. With the resources available to the project, it is clearly not possible to collect all the information that could be required by the whole range of investigations into change in the Antarctic. Instead a key set of meteorological variables (surface temperature, mean sea level pressure and surface wind speed, and upper air temperature, geopotential height and wind speed at standard levels) are being assembled and a definitive set of measurements presented for use by researchers. A lot of stations have been operated in the Antarctic over the years; many for quite short periods. However, our goal here is to provide information on the long time series that can provide insight into change in the Antarctic. So to be included, the record from a station must extend for 25 years, although not necessarily in a continuous period, or be currently in operation and have operated for the last 10 years. In READER we have chosen to use only data from year-round stations.

  • This is the high frequency (10 Hz) eddy covariance (EC) measurements which mainly contain the wind data, ship motion data, gas concentration data and the underway measurements. These data were measured on summer 2019 during two Arctic cruises JR18006 (from and to Aberdeen, UK and visited the Barents Sea ) and JR18007 (from Harwich, UK to Svalbard and visited the Greenland Sea). These EC data can be used to directly calculate the air-sea CO2 and sensible heat fluxes. The EC system was deployed on RRS James Clark Ross by Thomas Bell and Mingxi Yang (Plymouth Marine Laboratory). Please see Dong et al., (2021) for details of these EC data. Eddy covariance air-sea CO2 flux measurements were made possible by funding from the NERC ORCHESTRA (NE/N018095/1) and European Space Agency AMT4oceanSatFluxCCN (4000125730/18/NL/FF /gp) projects.

  • Comprehensive measurements were taken on the Larsen C Ice Shelf and used to compute the Surface Energy Budget (SEB). Data were collected from two automatic weather stations (AWS) put in place in January 2009. Parallel to the AWS measurements, high-quality spectral and broadband radiation measurements were carried out, as well as direct measurements of turbulent fluxes. A special part of the field experiment focused on the direct measurement of liquid water content in the snowpack, using time-domain reflectometry (TDR).

  • Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model output for Larsen Ice Shelf run at 4km resolution. Modelling was carried out to support the Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project during the 2010-2011 field season.

  • UK Met Office UM (Unified Model) output for Larsen Ice Shelf, run at 1.5km resolution. Modelling was carried out to support the Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project during the 2010-2011 field season.