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  • During the austral summer of 2001/02 five thousand line kilometres of airborne radio echo sounding and aeromagnetic data were collected in the region of three tributaries of Slessor Glacier, East Antarctica, which drains into the Filchner Ice Shelf. We present here the processed bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding acquired using the BAS aerogeophysicaly equipped Twin Otter aircraft. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data. Data were collected as part of UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) grant GR3/AFI2/65

  • A British Antarctic Survey Twin Otter and survey team acquired 15,500 line-km of aerogeophysical data during the 2001/02 Antarctic field season along a 1-km line spacing grid with tie-lines 8 km apart. Twenty-five flights were flown from the South African base SANAE, for a total of 100 survey hours. We present here the processed bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding. The airborne-radio echosounding data were collected for 5 flights, to image ice-thickness and bedrock configuration. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data. This high-resolution aerogeophysical survey was part of the "Magmatism as a Monitor of Gondwanabreak-up" project (MAMOG) of the British Antarctic Survey, which included new geochemical investigations, structural geology, geochronology, and AMS studies over western Dronning Maud Land.

  • During the 2010/2011 Antarctic field season a collaborative NERC AFI (Antarctic Funding Initiative) project studying the basal boundary conditions of the Institute & Moller ice streams, West Antarctica, collected ~25,000 km of new high quality aerogeophysics data. Data were acquired using the BAS PASIN depth sounding radar mounted in the BAS aerogeophysically equipped Twin Otter "Bravo Lima". Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data. Data were collected as part of the UK Natural Environment Research Council AFI grant NE/G013071/1.

  • The survey collected a total of 11,500 km of data along 22 lines, spaced 12 km apart and oriented perpendicular to the strike of both the Bouguer anomaly field, as derived from land data (McGibbon and Smith, 1991), and the major sub-ice topographical features (Doake et al., 1983). The speed of the aircraft was set to produce a sample spacing of about 60 m and the data were collected at heights between 1600 and 2000 m above sea level. The gravity signal was recorded using a LaCoste and Romberg air/sea gravimeter, S-83, which has been kindly loaned to BAS by the Hydrographic Office of the Royal Navy. The meter was modified by the ZLS company for use in an aircraft. The equipment was deployed in a BAS De-Havilland Twin Otter aircraft. Differential, dual frequency, carrier phase, GPS measurements of the aircraft''s motion were made using Trimble and Ashtech geodetic receivers and antennas. Ice thickness data were obtained using a BAS-built, radio echo sounding system (Corr and Popple, 1994). Ice-bottom returns over most of the survey area were obtained at a sample spacing of approximately 28 m. GPS measurements were tied into base stations in International Terrain Reference Frame network (Dietrich et al., 1998) and gravity measurements to base stations in the IGSN71 net (Jones and Ferris, 1999). We present here the processed bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding collected using the BAS PASIN radar system. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data.

  • During the 2001-02 field season a regional survey was flown on a 10 km line spacing grid over the drainage basin of the Rutford Ice stream (West Antarctica), as part of the TORUS (Targeting ice stream onset regions and under-ice systems) project. We present here the bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding collected using the "BAS-built" radar depth sounding system mounted on the BAS aerogeophysical equipped Twin Otter aircraft. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data

  • The dataset lists information about the instrumentation of boreholes drilled into Khumbu Glacier, Nepal. Boreholes were drilled in May 2017 and May 2018 to investigate the internal properties of Khumbu Glacier, specifically ice thickness, temperature, deformation and structure, as part of the NERC-funded ''EverDrill'' research project. The information provided includes each borehole''s ID, length, location, elevation and instrumentation, including the type and depth of each sensor. Funding was provided by the NERC grant NE/P00265X/1 and NE/P002021/1.

  • Ground truth measurements in the form of snow/ice cores were obtained from three sites in 2006: Rothschild Island, Latady Island and Smyley Island. The sites selected corresponded to the position of Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) deployed during the previous season. At both the Rothschild Island and Smyley Island sites the AWS - due to an unprecedented amount of snowfall - had been buried. Therefore, two cores, 8m and 12m in length, were obtained from the approximate position of the AWS, in addition to the sampling of a snow pit. At the Latady Island site, the top 60cm of the 5m AWS was protruding above the surface - again, due to an unprecedented amount of snowfall. A diagonally descending trench was dug to recover the AWS and two cores were collected at this site. This work was carried out as part of a project to understand how air mass origin and meteorology affect the mass accumulation of snow in areas of the Antarctic Peninsula, and how the atmosphere''s properties are preserved in the snow, Photographs of the expedition showing the ground layout, the situation of the cores and what was done when they were gathered are available and stored with the data.

  • This dataset contains bed, surface elevation and ice thickness measurements from the Recovery/Slessor/Bailey Region, East Antarctica. Radar data was collected using the 150MHz PASIN radar echo sounding system (Corr et al., 2007) deployed on a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Twin Otter during the ICEGRAV-2013 airborne geophysics campaign (Forsberg et al., 2018). Data is identified by flight and are available in both Geosoft database (.gdb) and ASCII file formats (.xyz).

  • In 2011, aerogeophysics data were acquired over Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica on a grid comprising 30 transverse lines across the glacier, each around 20 km long, and with a spacing of roughly 500 m between the lines. The orientation of the lines was selected to be perpendicular to the surface features visible in satellite images in the central part of the ice shelf. Elevation of the ice-surface directly beneath the aircraft was simultaneously measured using a nadir-pointing laser altimeter. We present here the processed bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding collected using the BAS PASIN radar system. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data.

  • This dataset contains the position and depth (ice thickness) of three spatially-extensive Internal Reflecting Horizons (IRHs) mapped from ice-penetrating radar data acquired with the British Antarctic Survey''s PASIN and PASIN2 ice radar systems across central East Antarctica. The dataset extends geographically from Dome A to South Pole. Using previous dated IRHs from Winter et al (2019), an independent validation of IRH ages from the South Pole ice-core chronology and a 1-D steady-state model, we assigned ages to our three IRHs: (H1) 38.5 +/- 2.2 ka, (H2) 90.4 +/- 3.57, and (H3) 161.9 +/- 6.76 ka. This study was motivated by the AntArchitecture Action Group of the Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research (SCAR). The project was supported by the National Environmental Research Council (NERC)-funded ONE Planet Doctoral Training Partnership (NE/S007512/1), hosted jointly by Newcastle and Northumbria Universities. The authors thank the BAS science and logistics teams for acquiring both the AGAP PASIN and PolarGAP PASIN2 data which is fully available on the Polar Airborne Geophysics Data Portal of the UK Polar Data Center (https://www.bas.ac.uk/project/nagdp/). BedMachine (version 2) data are available at https://doi.org/10.5067/E1QL9HFQ7A8M.