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  • The data consists of a CSV file of mean sea level pressure (MSLP, in hPa), 1.25 m temperature (in celsius), 10 m wind speed (in knots), 10 m wind direction (in degrees), and relative humidity (in percent) measured at Signy Station (Latitude 60 degress 43''0"S, Longitude 45 degrees 36''0"W) for the period of 1947 - 1994. These data were used by Lu et al. (2023) to study extreme high temperature events in the South Orkney Islands (SOIs). Funding was provided by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to the Atmosphere, Ice and Climate Programme of British Antarctic Survey (BAS), NERC National Capability International grant SURface FluxEs In AnTarctica (NE/X009319/1) and the European Union''s Horizon 2020 research and innovation framework programme under Grant agreement no. 101003590 (PolarRES).

  • High-resolution simulations of extreme warm temperature events over South Georgia Islands using the UK Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) were conducted at the British Antarctic Survey. The simulations are conducted for the period 1 to 17 January 1991, which included an event in which the temperature at Signy station peaked at 17.4 degrees Celsius on 13 January 1991, as well as a series of consecutive warm events preceding this. The dataset consists of 1) 10 m zonal wind, 10 m meridional wind, 1.5 m temperature, 1.5 m dew point temperature, 1.5 m relative humidity, and mean sea level pressure at a temporal resolution of every 1 hr for the period 1 to 17 January, 2) zonal wind, meridional wind, vertical wind, and potential temperature on model levels at 00UTC 13 January, and 3) rainfall rate at 00 UTC 13 January (averaged over a 3-hr period). The MetUM is run over a domain that includes South Orkney Islands and the surrounding ocean, which comprises 120 x 120 grid points at a grid spacing of 1 km. The model output is used to investigate the detailed influence of South Orkney Islands orography on temperature, precipitation, and winds, and in particular the importance of foehn events in producing extreme warm temperatures at Signy station. Funding: 1) Core funding from the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to the Atmosphere, Ice and Climate Programme of British Antarctic Survey (BAS). 2) NERC National Capability International grant SURface FluxEs In AnTarctica (NE/X009319/1). 3) European Union''s Horizon 2020 research and innovation framework programme under Grant agreement no. 101003590 (PolarRES).

  • High-resolution hindcasts (1979-2019) of summer climate over Antarctica using the UK Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) and HIRHAM5 were conducted at the British Antarctic Survey and Danish Meteorological Institute, respectively. The hindcasts are conducted for summer 1979-2018, i.e., from December 1979 to February 2019, for December, January, February (DJF). This dataset consists of near-surface temperature output from these hindcasts at a temporal resolution of every 3 hrs. The hindcasts are contributions to the COordinated Regional Downscaling EXperiment (CORDEX) project. Both models are run over Antarctic CORDEX domains, which encompass all of Antarctica and some of the surrounding ocean, at a horizontal grid spacing of around 12 km. The near-surface temperatures are used to estimate regional surface melt "potential" over Antarctic ice shelves as a function of summertime temperature extremes and identify regions of potentially enhanced "hotspots" of melt potential based on the occurrence (and magnitude) of various temperatures. Funding was provided by the European Union''s Horizon 2020 research and innovation framework programme under Grant agreement no. 101003590 (PolarRES)

  • UK Met Office UM (Unified Model) output for Larsen Ice Shelf, run at 4km resolution. Modelling was carried out to support the Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project during the 2010-2011 field season.

  • Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model output for Larsen Ice Shelf run at 4km resolution. Modelling was carried out to support the Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project during the 2010-2011 field season.

  • Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model output for Larsen Ice Shelf, run at 1km resolution. Modelling was carried out to support the Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project during the 2010-2011 field season.

  • UK Met Office UM (Unified Model) output for Larsen Ice Shelf, run at 1.5km resolution. Modelling was carried out to support the Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project during the 2010-2011 field season.

  • The Skiymet meteor radar was deployed at Rothera (68S, 68W) in Feb 2005. The radar measures the winds, waves and tides of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) regions of the atmosphere. The radar routinely makes three types of measurement: 1. horizontal winds at heights of ~ 75 - 105 km from the drifting of meteors as they are carried by the winds of the MLT; 2. atmospheric temperature from the decay rate of meteor echoes; 3. meteor fluxes, derived from several thousand meteors per day. The radar has been used with an existing, identical, radar in the Arctic at the conjugate latitude of 68N, 21E (Esrange) to produce accurate climatologies of winds, waves and tides - and to quantify the differences between the Antarctic and Arctic MLT (using identical radars eliminates otherwise problematic measurement biases). Other studies will carefully examine meteor/MF-radar instrument biases and apply a developing technique to continually measure temperature using the decay rate of meteor echoes. The radar complements the existing OH temperature spectrometer and imaging airglow camera at Rothera.