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  • Data comprise site location, soil chemistry (pH, soil moisture), soil radionuclide activity concentrations (the isotopes measured were: Americium-241, Caesium-137, Plutonium-238, -239 and -240, Strontium-90 (K-40 and U-238 activity concentrations were estimated from stable element data) and soil biological activity (derived from application of bait lamina sticks) at 18 sites in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ), Ukraine in 2016; data for four sites in 2005 are also presented. Estimate absorbed radionuclide dose rates to soil invertebrates and bacteria are also presented. The primary purpose of these data was to enable an evaluation of the potential impact of radiation on soil organisms. The work was carried out by UKCEH, Chernobyl Centre for Nuclear Safety and the University of Salford. Funding for this work was via the TREE project funded by NERC, Environment Agency and Radioactive Waste Management Ltd. under the RATE programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/19babe1c-b3a3-488c-b4fe-ebb4ab9237d8

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. A spatial indicator of ecological status for valuation of biodiversity across the UK, based on species occurrence records was developed. UK species occurrence data were collated from the Biological Records Centre (BRC). The mean ecological status was calculated across all taxonomic groups for the 2000 to 2013 time period, relative to the species richness maximums from the 1970-1990 time period, showing differences as colours. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f30e4fde-634b-402a-b807-b5188d21b998

  • Data comprise plot details and radionuclide activity concentrations for Sr-90, Cs-137, Am-241, Pu-238, Pu-239 and Pu-240 in ‘grassy’ vegetation and soil. These radionuclide activity concentrations have been used to make estimations of total weighted absorbed doses to grassy vegetation, deciduous trees and bacteria; no dose rate estimates for grassy vegetation have been made for those sites where grassy vegetation was absent. Radiation from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident killed coniferous trees in a 4-6 km2 area of forest to the west of the power plant. This area is now known as the 'Red Forest’ and it has subsequently regenerated with understorey vegetation and deciduous trees; it is the most anthropogenically contaminated radioactive ecosystem on Earth. In July 2016 a severe fire burnt (to varying degrees) c. 80 percent of the Red Forest; this presented a unique opportunity to study the impact of radiation on the recovery of forest ecosystems exposed to a secondary stressor (fire). To investigate this, in September 2017 the RED FIRE project set up sixty study plots in the Red Forest (in burnt and unburnt areas) with a further nine plots established close to Buriakivka village (approximately 8 km from the Red Forest). Vegetation samples from each plot were harvested using shears in September 2017. Each sample was sorted into ‘grassy’ and ‘other’ vegetation; these were air-dried (20-25 degrees Celsius) and the grassy vegetation samples homogenised prior to radionuclide analyses. Soil core samples collected in September 2017 were bulked, homogenised and sub-samples taken for determination of pH and percentage moisture determined by oven drying (approximately 60 degrees Celsius) to a constant mass. The remaining soil sample was used for the determination of radionuclide activity concentrations; prior to analyses, these samples were dried at approximately 80 degrees Celsius. This work was funded by the NERC, Grant Ref: NE/P015212/1 (RED FIRE: Radioactive Environment Damaged by fire: a Forest In Recovery) Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/60782622-7bfa-4615-a9e3-0a802a9f4674

  • The data consist of standardised counts of taxon abundances (bacteria, fungi and micro eukaryotes) from soil samples collected from paired intensive and extensive grassland systems, including low and high pH parent soils, from 32 sites across the United Kingdom. The samples were collected during winter and spring 2015-2016 from sites across the UK. DNA were extracted and taxonomic marker genes assessed using high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques to yield information about the genetic diversity and abundance of the microorganisms therein. The data were collected to help understand soil functional change in a variety of management and climatic scenarios as part of NERC U-GRASS (Understanding and enhancing soil ecosystem services and resilience in UK grass and croplands) award (NERC Reference NE/M017125/1) part of the NERC Soil Security Programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/11bc98b8-5f2b-4a25-804c-16010052cdb7

  • A spatial indicator of ecological status for valuation of biodiversity across the UK, based on species occurrence records for eleven taxonomic groups (Bees, Birds, Bryophytes, Butterflies, Carabidae, Hoverflies, Isopoda, Ladybirds, Moths, Orthoptera and Vascular plants) was developed. UK species occurrence data were collated from the Biological Records Centre (BRC). The mean ecological status was calculated across all taxonomic groups for the 2000 to 2013 time period, relative to the species richness maximums from the 1970-1990 time period. This version supersedes the dataset "UK ecological status map". Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/58b248a8-6e34-4ffb-ae32-3744566399a2

  • Data on the carbon and nitrogen cycling in soils from different geologies within the Hampshire Avon catchment, UK. The dataset also includes functional gene data, anion and cation concentrations, methane production and oxidation potential, and nitrification, denitrification and mineralization rates. Data were collected between February 2013 and November 2014. Data were collected to address the hypotheses of how the functional microbial community involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling changed seasonally and with geology. Data were collected as part of the project "The role of lateral exchange in modulating the seaward flux of C, N, P", funded under NERC's Macronutrients Cycles research programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/83f83414-f644-4684-ad5b-e1237fb12fc5

  • Data on the carbon and nitrogen cycling in sediments from rivers within the Hampshire Avon catchment, UK. The dataset includes functional gene data, anion and cation concentrations, methane production and oxidation potential, carbohydrates concentrations, pigment data, and particle size data. Data were collected between February 2013 and November 2014. Data were collected to address the hypotheses of how the functional microbial community involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling changed seasonally and with geology. Data were collected as part of the project "The role of lateral exchange in modulating the seaward flux of C, N, P", funded under NERC's Macronutrients Cycles research programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/976602b3-a58d-460c-a52d-088d0bb09989