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  • This product consists of maps of predicted average annual application rates of three different inorganic chemical fertilisers – nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) - in England across a six-year period (2010-2015). The estimates, along with their respective estimates of uncertainty, are provided at a 1 km x 1 km resolution. These data were modelled from Defra British Survey of Fertiliser Practice (BSFP) data using a spatial interpolation procedure. Different uses and potential applications of the produced maps, including the following: 1) Modelling nutrient fate to predict impacts of changes in farming practices (intensification/extensification) on nutrient runoff to water; 2) Estimating greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions due to fertiliser application to crops and grassland (linked with air quality impacts); 3) Quantifying past and future impacts of eutrophication and/or agricultural management on agricultural ecosystems and indicators such as arable plants, farmland birds, pollinators; 4) Linking crop growth models to predict areas where better nutrient management may improve yields; 5) Improving policies aimed at mitigating negative impacts of fertiliser use (e.g. catchment sensitive farming to reduce pollution and/or improve water quality). This data product was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) under research programme NE/N018125/1 Achieving Sustainable Agricultural Systems (ASSIST). ASSIST is an initiative jointly supported by NERC and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/15f415db-e87b-4ab5-a2fb-37a78e7bf051

  • The dataset contains concentrations of Total Organic Carbon, Chloride, Fluoride, Bromine, Sulfate, Potassium, Aluminium, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Sodium, Phosphorus, Chromium, Manganese, Cobalt, Nickel, Copper, Zinc, Arsenic, Selenium, Molybdenum, Cadmium, Lead and stable water isotopes (δD and δ18O) for 25 groundwater and surface water sampling locations, surveyed over the period February 2017 to May 2018 immediately following Dineo floods. The data were collected as part of the PULA project, which aimed at understanding the immediate effect of heavy rainfall and floods on water resources in arid Botswana and their transitional hydrologic readjustment towards the dry period, and the role of these events in supporting either or both resources replenishment and contamination. The project was co-ordinated by the University of Aberdeen, with partners at the Botswana International University of Science and Technology, the Government of Botswana Department of Water Affairs, and the International Water Management Institute. The project was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council as part of its Urgency grants scheme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c7793128-1961-45d5-aa18-5f023116784b

  • This dataset represents the first publication of complete national maps from the Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) and TellusNI projects, whose aim was to conduct a national geochemical survey of the United Kingdom in order to improve understanding of our geology and environment and provide quantitative evidence against which to gauge future environmental change. This dataset consists of a series of interpolated raster (ASCII grid) maps displaying the concentrations of a suite of chemical elements (and oxides) in the stream sediments of the United Kingdom. The chemical elements are as follows: Arsenic, Barium, Calcium (CaO), Chromium, Cobalt, Copper, Iron (Fe2O3), Lanthanum, Lead, Magnesium (MgO), Manganese (MnO), Nickel, Potassium (K2O), Rubidium, Uranium, Vanadium, Zinc and Zirconium.

  • Data comprise radionuclide concentrations in soils and a range of terrestrial vertebrate species (reptiles, small mammals and birds) sampled in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) between 1999 and 2008. Reptiles were collected in 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003 and 2007, birds, bats, and small mammals were collected in 2004, 2005, 2007 and 2008. Dose rate data are provided for one study, both as ambient dose rate measurements and also as recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to small mammal species. The isotopes measured include: Americium-241, Caesium-134 and 137, Cobalt-60, Europium-154 and 155, Potassium-40, Plutonium-238, -239 and -240, Strontium-90. The data were used to assess the concentration of radioactive contamination in soil, consequent uptake of radionuclides by wildlife living in the CEZ and to test prediction of the ERICA Tool assessment model. The data were used to assess the uptake of radionuclides by wildlife living in the CEZ and to derive transfer parameters, and also to test predictions of the assessment model the ‘ERICA Tool’. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/518f88df-bfe7-442e-97ad-922b5aef003a

  • This dataset contains nitrogen data from nitrate, ammonium and nitrite, total nitrogen and carbon data, and elemental composition data from anaerobic digestate and biomass ash from UK bioenergy production. Anaerobic digestate was sampled 8 times from different industrial scale plants across the UK between January 2015 and January 2018 and biomass ash was sampled in January 2015 and June 2016. Anaerobic digestate was sourced from segregated food waste (mainly household waste), pig slurry, maize silage, vegetables waste, sweet corn waste, aerobically treated food waste, food manufacturer waste and other biodegradable sludge from within the UK. Biomass ash, both fly and bottom ash, from virgin and recycled wood was sourced from three sites within the UK and one from Spain. All laboratory analyses were undertaken at Lancaster University using standardised methods. The data were collected as part of the research grant, Developing a suite of novel land conditioners and plant fertilizers from the waste streams of biomass energy generation. The research was funded by NERC, award NE/L014122/1. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/990c54f6-5c92-4054-8bfa-953533a89149

  • Discrete data for major ions and nutrients in river water for 13 sites in the Humber catchment over the periods 1993 to 1997 and 1996 to 1997 and for 3 sites from the Tweed catchment over the period 1994 to 1997. Ions and nutrients measured were: Ammonia, Calcium (dissolved), Magnesium (dissolved), Potassium (dissolved), Sodium (dissolved), Bromide-ion, Carbon (organic dissolved), Chloride-ion, Nitrate, Nitrite, Phosphorus (soluble reactive), Phosphorus (total dissolved), Silicate (reactive dissolved), Sulphate, Carbon (organic particulate), Nitrogen (particulate), Phosphorus (total). Sites were sampled at regular weekly intervals and more intermittently during high flows (on average an extra sampling once a month per site). Samples were obtained using a wide neck PTFE bottle in a plastic covered bottle carrier (lowered from bridges where possible otherwise collected by immersing sample bottle by hand in the water as near the main flow as possible). Samples were filtered through Whatman 0.45um sterile membrane filters immediately on return to laboratory. Samples stored in sterilin tubes in the dark at 40C and analysed by Dionex DX100 ion chromatography system. Silicate reactive dissolved and Chloride-ion concentrations were determined by automated colourimetry and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were determined using a TOCsin II aqueous carbon analyser. Some samples on the River Aire were collected using EPIC automatic samplers. The analysis was carried out by members of the analytical chemistry section at York University (from April 1994 until November 1996) and at Wallingford Institute of Hydrology (September 1993 to April 1994 and December 1996 to April 1997), as part of the Land Ocean Interaction Study (LOIS). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4482fa14-aee2-4c7f-9c62-a08dc9704051

  • Trace metal mobilisation data (pH, ALK, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Li, SO4, Si, Be, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Al,Sr, Be, Ba, Y,Co, Ni, B, Rb, Y, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Pb, Th, U) for the River Carnon, the River Fal (downstream) and its estuary in Cornwall following discharge of highly polluted water from the Wheal Jane mine. In January 1992, there was a major pollution incident involving highly acidic wastes. CEH, in conjunction with the University of Reading monitored the River Carnon between September 1992 and April 1994, to examine the water quality.