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  • The data set consists of bird species counts, recorded in 300 1km squares across Wales, collected as part of the Glastir Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (GMEP). The monitoring programme was set up by the Welsh Government in 2013 to monitor the effects of the Glastir agri-environment scheme on the environment and ran from 2013 to 2016. The field survey element was based on a stratified random sampling design of 300 x 1km square sites across Wales, and was managed by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/31da0a94-62be-47b3-b76e-4bdef3037360

  • This dataset comprises cast reconstructions of brain cavity space in 60 extant avian species, derived from X-ray micro computed-tomography scan image stacks. Each reconstruction was made using Materialise Mimics 14.11 to create volumetric models (brain cavity casts) that were then transformed into the polygon mesh stereolithograph (STL) files archived here. Brain cavity cast models are in most cases accompanied by casts of main vascular features (e.g., carotid arteries) and the olfactory nerves (CN I). A data file (Data_TableComma Separated Values) based on values reported in Table 1 of Walsh et al. (2013: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0067176) is included that records volume values used in the original analysis, and coding of cerebellar flocculus morphology. Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4e15f483-5b05-409e-acc0-5117fc24e90b

  • This dataset comprises bird abundance data collected using point count methods in Bedford, Luton and Milton Keynes in the summer of 2013. The purpose of the study was to characterise the variation in breeding bird fauna across a range of urban forms. As well as measuring the birds that were 'really' present, the survey aimed to investigate the birds detectable at times of day when people were more active and more likely to have casual encounters with them. These data were collected as part of the Fragments, Functions and Flows in Urban Ecosystem Services (F3UES) project, as part of the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) framework. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c4806e25-5325-4b01-8066-91a8fb55eb41

  • This data collection results from abundance surveys of 7 species of weeds in ca. 500 lowland arable fields in 49 farms over three years. Each field was divided into large grids of 20x20 metre cells, and the density of seven species was estimated three times a year. The study is part of the NERC Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. In the context of changing external and internal pressures on UK agriculture, particularly those associated with the ongoing reform of the EU Common Agricultural Policy, it is imperative to determine whether all of the various dimensions of sustainability - including the relevant economic and environmental objectives as well as social and cultural values - can be integrated successfully at the farm and landscape levels. Although the ways in which economic, technological, and regulatory changes are likely to affect the profitability and management of farms of varying size are reasonably well understood, there is not the knowledge or understanding to predict the resulting effects on biodiversity. For example, the effect of changes in arable farming practices on field weeds and, in turn, on habitats and food supply required to sustain farm birds is a case in point. This knowledge is critical, however, if we are to understand the ecological consequences of changes in agricultural policy. Furthermore, it is also important if we are to design and justify changes in farming methods that can not only enhance nature conservation, but do this is ways that are practical and appealing from a farmer's point of view. This understanding is essential if we are to achieve an agriculture that is sustainable in both economic and environmental terms and is widely perceived to have social and cultural value. A consistent theme in all components of this research project is to understand the behaviour (of farmers, weeds or birds) and then use this information to produce predictive models. Whilst there have been a number of models of economic behaviour, weed populations and bird populations - including many by the research team here - the really novel component of this research is to integrate these within one framework. Farmer interviews on economic attitudes and preferences associated with and importance of different land-use objectives to lowland arable farmers are available at the UK Data Archive under study number 6728 (see online resources). Further documentation for this study may be found through the RELU Knowledge Portal and the project's ESRC funding award web page (see online resources).

  • This dataset contains concentrations of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and mercury (Hg) in merlin and golden eagle egg contents collected as part of the Predatory Bird Monitoring Scheme (PBMS). In addition to residue data, for each record the year and region in which the egg was collected, and the egg shell index are recorded. The PBMS is a long-term, national monitoring scheme that quantifies the concentrations of contaminants in the livers and eggs of selected species of predatory and fish-eating birds in Britain. Levels of contaminants are monitored to determine variations between species and regions, changes over time and effects on individual birds and their populations. The Scheme is currently funded by CEH, Natural England, the Environment Agency (EA) and the Campaign for Responsible Rodenticide Use (CRRU). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ad38a087-01a3-4865-b07c-a088ffb65916

  • Data comprise concentrations of organochlorine insecticides and mercury in sparrowhawk, kestrel and heron livers taken during post mortem from deceased birds of prey sent into the Predatory Bird Monitoring Scheme (PBMS) by the public. The data are presented as micrograms of contaminant per gram of liver tissue (wet weight). The PBMS is a long-term, national monitoring scheme that quantifies the concentrations of contaminants in the livers and eggs of selected species of predatory and fish-eating birds in Britain. Levels of contaminants are monitored to determine variations between species and regions, changes over time and effects on individual birds and their populations. The Scheme is currently funded by CEH, Natural England, the Environment Agency (EA) and the Campaign for Responsible Rodenticide Use (CRRU). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e39e3afb-eb90-4a7d-921d-e03b1a0f414d

  • The data records bird species and number in different green spaces within Sheffield City Region during June and July 2018. Activity of individual birds is also noted. Ten green spaces (parks) were surveyed on three occasions, with a researcher walking along six pre-designated line transects in each location. Birds were recorded by their common names and British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) code. Date and time were recorded for each observation. The data was collected as part of the NERC IWUN Project (Improving well-being through urban nature). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/aff674ee-cf95-4378-b002-f41c0a5a6a4e