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  • Data from 38 experimental sites across the UK and Ireland were collated resulting in 623 separate mineral fertiliser N2O emission factors (EF) estimates derived from field measurements. Data were either i) extracted from published studies in which one aim of the experimentation was to explicitly measure N2O and report EFs after a mineral fertiliser application, or ii) raw data were used from the Agricultural and Environmental Data Archive (AEDA). To find the published data, a survey of literature was conducted using Google Scholar for articles considered ‘recent’ (20 years or fewer), i.e. published after January 1998 and submitted before April 2019. The following search terms and their variations were used: N2O, nitrous oxide, emission factor, mineral fertiliser, ammonium nitrate, urea, nitrification inhibitor, nitrogen use efficiency, agriculture, greenhouse gas, grassland and arable. This search based on keywords was complemented with a search through the literature cited in the articles found and known previous research. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9948d1b9-caa1-4894-93e6-cc0f4326fced

  • This dataset contains vegetation abundance data and sward height data from a number of plots across a restoration gradient within South West England. The restoration gradient covered intensive land use (referred to in the data as reference or control), restoring and pristine habitats. Data were collected between April and July in 2014. Vegetation abundance was recorded as percentage cover of species within a 1m x 1m quadrat. Five quadrats were recorded per plot. Sward height was recorded using two methods: drop disc or direct measure. Five height measurements were taken using both methods at each site. To protect the anonymity of private landholders, details of sampling plot location is not provided with this dataset. The data were collected by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology as part of the Tellus South West project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/110199cf-245e-4fa8-a9ca-386657b5fe20

  • Data comprise results of systematic live-trapping surveys of small mammals on three types of arable field margin at 30 locations on the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire (UK), for four autumn and four spring periods between 2005 and 2011. Trapping was conducted on standard (cross compliance) field margins, and also on conservation margins (Entry Level Scheme). Data include 3172 trap records of animal captures, including breeding condition, mass (g), and recaptures. Dominant species are Wood Mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus), Bank Vole (Myodes glareolus), Field Vole (Microtus agrestis) and Common Shrew (Sorex araneus), with smaller numbers of Pygmy Shrew (Sorex minutus), Water Shrew (Neomys fodiens) and Harvest Mouse (Micromys minutus). The research was funded by Defra. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5a0eaccc-446b-4854-b717-efaec6b83b86

  • This dataset consists of farm management data which includes crop drilling dates and herbicide application dates. The data relate to arable fields in which a range of ecological measurements were collected, including species counts in the following areas: weed seedbank, vegetation in the crop, field edge vegetation, invertebrates. Each field was sown with a combination of genetically modified and conventional crops, either Beet, Maize, Spring-sown Oilseed Rape or Winter-sown oilseed Rape. The data were collected as part of the Farm Scale Evaluations (FSEs), a four-year programme of research by independent researchers aimed at studying the effect that the management practices associated with Genetically Modified Herbicide Tolerant (GMHT) crops might have on farmland wildlife, when compared with weed control used with non-GM crops. Data were collected by a consortium of: the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology, ITE (now the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, CEH), the Institute of Arable Crop Research (now Rothamstead Research, IACR) and the Scottish Crop Research Institute, SCRI (now the James Hutton Institute, JHI). Data were collected for four crops overall (Beet, Maize, Spring-sown Oilseed Rape and Winter-sown oilseed Rape).

  • This dataset consists of a range of ecological measurements collected from a set of arable fields, each sown with a combination of genetically modified and conventional maize crops. Measurements include species counts in the following areas: weed seedbank, vegetation in the crop, field edge vegetation, invertebrates. The data were collected as part of the Farm Scale Evaluations (FSEs), a four-year programme of research by independent researchers aimed at studying the effect that the management practices associated with Genetically Modified Herbicide Tolerant (GMHT) crops might have on farmland wildlife, when compared with weed control used with non-GM crops. Data were collected by a consortium of: the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (now the Centre for Ecology &Hydrology), the Institute of Arable Crops Research (now Rothamsted Research) and the Scottish Crop Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute). Data were collected for four crops overall (Beet, Maize, Spring-sown Oilseed Rape and Winter-sown oilseed Rape). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ca6752ed-3a22-4790-a86d-afadaedda082

  • This dataset consists of a range of ecological measurements collected from a set of arable fields, each sown with a combination of genetically modified and conventional winter-sown oilseed rape crops. Measurements include species counts in the following areas: weed seedbank, vegetation in the crop, field edge vegetation, invertebrates. The data were collected as part of the Farm Scale Evaluations (FSEs), a four-year programme of research by independent researchers aimed at studying the effect that the management practices associated with Genetically Modified Herbicide Tolerant (GMHT) crops might have on farmland wildlife, when compared with weed control used with non-GM crops. Data were collected by a consortium of: the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (now the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology), the Institute of Arable Crops Research (now Rothamsted Research) and the Scottish Crop Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute). Data were collected for four crops overall (Beet, Maize, Spring-sown Oilseed Rape and Winter-sown oilseed Rape). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/37a503da-d75c-4d72-8e8b-b11c2fdc7d92

  • This dataset consists of a range of ecological measurements collected from a set of arable fields, each sown with a combination of genetically modified and conventional spring-sown oilseed rape crops. Measurements include species counts in the following areas: weed seedbank, vegetation in the crop, field edge vegetation, invertebrates. The data were collected as part of the Farm Scale Evaluations (FSEs), a four-year programme of research by independent researchers aimed at studying the effect that the management practices associated with Genetically Modified Herbicide Tolerant (GMHT) crops might have on farmland wildlife, when compared with weed control used with non-GM crops. Data were collected by a consortium of: the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (now the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology), the Institute of Arable Crops Research (now Rothamsted Research) and the Scottish Crop Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute). Data were collected for four crops overall (Beet, Maize, Spring-sown Oilseed Rape and Winter-sown oilseed Rape). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0023bd6e-4dd7-462c-aacf-f13083b054ab

  • This dataset consists of a range of ecological measurements collected from a set of arable fields, each sown with a combination of genetically modified and conventional beet crops. Measurements include species counts in the following areas: weed seedbank, vegetation in the crop, field edge vegetation, invertebrates. The data were collected as part of the Farm Scale Evaluations (FSEs), a four-year programme of research by independent researchers aimed at studying the effect that the management practices associated with Genetically Modified Herbicide Tolerant (GMHT) crops might have on farmland wildlife, when compared with weed control used with non-GM crops. Data were collected by a consortium of: the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (now the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology), the Institute of Arable Crops Research (now Rothamsted Research) and the Scottish Crop Research Institute, SCRI (now the James Hutton Institute). Data were collected for four crops overall (Beet, Maize, Spring-sown Oilseed Rape and Winter-sown oilseed Rape). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/86cd1a60-64f1-4087-a9f1-a3d8a9f8f535