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  • The data comprise measurements of the ‘soluble’, ‘chemically exchangeable’ and ‘isotopically exchangeable’ U concentrations in a diverse set of soils following experimental addition of UO22+ and incubation in the laboratory under controlled temperature conditions for ca. 1.7 years. The long term behaviour of U in aerobic soils was studied by conducting a laboratory-based experiment in which a set of 20 topsoils from central England with contrasting properties (e.g. pH, organic matter content, land use) were contaminated with a solution containing UO22+ in soluble form and incubated in the dark, in a moist but aerobic condition, at a temperature of 10oC for 619 days. The transformations of U in each soil microcosm were periodically monitored by means of soil extractions conducted on subsamples of incubated soils. The resulting dataset enabled quantification of the kinetics of UO22+ transformations in aerobic soils and the relationships with soil properties and land uses (arable, grassland and moorland/woodland). The dataset will be useful in developing models of long-term U bioavailability in aerobic soils under temperate conditions. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0d8b2aea-574c-4cff-a8bd-17115a0b90fc

  • The data comprise measurements of the ‘soluble’, ‘adsorbed’ and ‘organically bound’ 99Tc concentrations in a diverse set of soils following experimental addition of 99TcO4- and incubation in the laboratory under controlled temperature conditions for 897 days. The long term behaviour of 99Tc in aerobic soils was studied by conducting a laboratory-based experiment in which a set of 20 topsoils from central England with contrasting properties (e.g. pH, organic matter content, land use) were contaminated with 99TcO4- and incubated in the dark, in a moist but aerobic condition, at a temperature of 10oC for 2.5 yr. The physico-chemical transformations of 99Tc in each soil microcosm were periodically monitored by means of a three-step sequential extraction procedure conducted on subsamples of incubated soil. The resulting dataset enabled quantification of the kinetics of 99Tc transformation in aerobic soils as a function of soil properties and land uses (arable, grassland and moorland/woodland). The data will be useful in developing models of long-term 99Tc bioavailability in aerobic soils under temperate conditions. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4622f906-e28a-4210-aa03-d2e4169b1be8

  • Data comprise radionuclide deposition, radioactivity dose measurements, radioactive particle activity and physical characteristic information from soil samples collected within and around the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) following the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986. Data include radiocaesium, radiostrontium and soil chemistry parameters from soils collected in 1997, plutonium isotope measurements in soil samples and soil layers collected in 2000 and 2001, 'Hot particle' dataset presenting radionuclide activity and some physical characteristics of 'hot particles' extracted from soils collected in the Ukraine and Poland between 1995 and 1997; and Ivankov region data (radionuclide activity concentrations and natural background dose measurements) from a survey of the Ivankov region, immediately to the south of the CEZ conducted in 2014. Funding for preparing this data set was provided by the EU COMET project (http://www.radioecology-exchange.org/content/comet) and TREE (http://www.ceh.ac.uk/tree) project funded by the NERC, Environment Agency and Radioactive Waste Management Ltd. under the RATE programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/782ec845-2135-4698-8881-b38823e533bf

  • Data comprise plot details and radionuclide activity concentrations for Sr-90, Cs-137, Am-241, Pu-238, Pu-239 and Pu-240 in ‘grassy’ vegetation and soil. These radionuclide activity concentrations have been used to make estimations of total weighted absorbed doses to grassy vegetation, deciduous trees and bacteria; no dose rate estimates for grassy vegetation have been made for those sites where grassy vegetation was absent. Radiation from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident killed coniferous trees in a 4-6 km2 area of forest to the west of the power plant. This area is now known as the 'Red Forest’ and it has subsequently regenerated with understorey vegetation and deciduous trees; it is the most anthropogenically contaminated radioactive ecosystem on Earth. In July 2016 a severe fire burnt (to varying degrees) c. 80 percent of the Red Forest; this presented a unique opportunity to study the impact of radiation on the recovery of forest ecosystems exposed to a secondary stressor (fire). To investigate this, in September 2017 the RED FIRE project set up sixty study plots in the Red Forest (in burnt and unburnt areas) with a further nine plots established close to Buriakivka village (approximately 8 km from the Red Forest). Vegetation samples from each plot were harvested using shears in September 2017. Each sample was sorted into ‘grassy’ and ‘other’ vegetation; these were air-dried (20-25 degrees Celsius) and the grassy vegetation samples homogenised prior to radionuclide analyses. Soil core samples collected in September 2017 were bulked, homogenised and sub-samples taken for determination of pH and percentage moisture determined by oven drying (approximately 60 degrees Celsius) to a constant mass. The remaining soil sample was used for the determination of radionuclide activity concentrations; prior to analyses, these samples were dried at approximately 80 degrees Celsius. This work was funded by the NERC, Grant Ref: NE/P015212/1 (RED FIRE: Radioactive Environment Damaged by fire: a Forest In Recovery) Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/60782622-7bfa-4615-a9e3-0a802a9f4674

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. Please note - this dataset is not current. For the most recent version, please search for the dataset titled 'Post Chernobyl surveys of radiocaesium in soil, vegetation, wildlife and fungi in Great Britain'. Data comprise radiocaesium concentrations in soil, vegetation, wildlife and fungi analysed from samples collected from throughout Great Britain after the 1986 Chernobyl accident by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), formerly the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (ITE). National level vegetation surveys were conducted in May 1986, October 1986 and Spring 1987. More intensive surveys of vegetation (grass and heather) and wildlife (grouse, fox, etc.) in restricted areas were carried out in Cumbria, Wales and North Yorkshire in 1989, 1990, 1991 and 1993. Surveys of fungi were carried out between 1994 and 1997. The data are suitable for interpolation to create spatially variable surfaces suitable for input into models. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7a5cfd3e-0247-4228-873d-5be563c4ee3b

  • Data comprise radiocaesium concentrations in soil, vegetation, wildlife and fungi analysed from samples collected from throughout Great Britain after the 1986 Chernobyl accident by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), formerly the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (ITE). National level vegetation surveys were conducted in May 1986, October 1986 and Spring 1987. More intensive surveys of vegetation (grass and heather) and wildlife (grouse, fox, etc.) in restricted areas were carried out in Cumbria, Wales and North Yorkshire in 1989, 1990, 1991 and 1993. Surveys of fungi were carried out between 1994 and 1997. The data are suitable for interpolation to create spatially variable surfaces suitable for input into models. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d0a6a8bf-68f0-4935-8b43-4e597c3bf251