Keyword

Biodiversity

176 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Available actions
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Service types
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 176
  • This dataset contains data from the National Plant Monitoring Scheme in 2015. These consist of plant species occurrences, with abundance values, in plots. Plots are nested with 1 km squares, and are georeferenced according to the British/Irish/Channel Islands grid systems, or in latitude/longitude format; the 1 km squares surveyed were selected according to a weighted-random design, designed to enrich the sample for semi-natural habitats. Plots also have associated habitat and spatial information, as well as a small number of other environmental data. The species recorded in any particular plot are dependent on the habitat chosen for the plot by the surveyor, and the level of the scheme at which they were participating. Please see the references in the supporting documentation (survey guidance) for more information. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/33fe87f9-d45a-41ba-acca-ee8585ea6b7d

  • This data set includes longitudinal occurrence of bird species at 36 forest plots – half of which burned during the 2015-16 El Niño drought – distributed across a gradient of prior human disturbance in the Brazilian Amazon. Data was collected in 2010 and 2016 (around 6 years before, and one year after the 2015-16 El Niño, respectively) as part of the projects ‘Assessing ENSO-induced Fire Impacts in tropical Rainforest Ecosystems’ (AFIRE) and ‘Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning in degraded and recovering Amazonian and Atlantic Forests’ (ECOFOR), within the NERC Human-Modified Tropical Forest (HTMF) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4b05caee-a3c8-46a7-b675-e5a94554bd9f

  • The data set comprises vegetation species and abundance information, surveyed using a 50 x 50 cm point quadrat, from a selection of the plots within an experimental site at Sourhope, Scotland. The surveys were carried out in the summers of 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002. The data were collected as part of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme, established in 1999 and centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT8545019630). During the experiment, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c730867f-ffd7-4d2d-9dd0-e2f30a7dbbf6

  • This dataset contains data from the National Plant Monitoring Scheme between 2015 and 2016. These consist of plant species occurrences, with abundance values, in plots. Plots are nested with 1 km squares, and are georeferenced according to the British/Irish/Channel Islands grid systems, or in latitude/longitude format; the 1 km squares surveyed were selected according to a weighted-random design, designed to enrich the sample for semi-natural habitats. Plots also have associated habitat and spatial information, as well as a small number of other environmental data. The species recorded in any particular plot are dependent on the habitat chosen for the plot by the surveyor, and the level of the scheme at which they were participating. Please see the references in the supporting documentation (survey guidance) for more information. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ba39167d-421a-4bfb-b504-56e9f8a38746

  • This dataset contains botanical data from 13 calcareous grassland, 13 heathland and 12 woodland sites within Dorset, UK. The sites were selected to represent a range of habitat types across a condition gradient as measured by levels of degradation from the original habitat. The original habitats were identified as being calcareous grassland, heathland or woodland from a survey conducted in the 1930s. Within heathland and calcareous grassland sites the percentage cover of all plant species were recorded within five 1m quadrat squares. Plants were recorded to species level where possible, or genus where species level was not possible. Covers of bare ground and litter were also recorded. Within woodlands plots, sampling was done slightly differently to enable recording of ground level plants and species within multiple canopy levels. Cover and presence of all herbaceous species were recorded in 2m quadrat squares, cover of tree seedlings (<1.5 m height) were recorded in 5m quadrat squares and ground-level cover of trunk of tree species if necessary were recorded in 10m quadrat squares. Heathland and calcareous grassland sites were visited in summer 2017 and woodland sites were visited in summer 2018. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8a75395f-7858-40a2-8364-eb3482aeaad1

  • This dataset consists of stock (area) data for Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) Broad Habitats across Great Britain in 1978. Data are presented as areas of Broad (or Priority) Habitats within a set of 256 1km squares across Great Britain. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/86c017ba-dc62-46f0-ad13-c862bf31740e

  • This dataset gives axiophyte score for plants in Great Britain, based on Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland (BSBI) published lists of axiophytes for 24 counties in Great Britain. Axiophytes have been defined as 'worthy plants', that is, species that are indicative of high quality habitat within a particular region. This information product takes the county lists that were available in May 2016, and summarises the data in order to produce national (i.e. Great Britain) level scores of 'axiophyte-ness'; that is, the extent to which a species has been selected as a good indicator of high quality habitat where it occurs. This meta-list of axiophytes will be updated in the future as more county-level lists become available. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/af2ac4af-12c6-4152-8ed7-e886ed19622b

  • This web map service shows bee nectar plant richness across Great Britain . The source data uses counts of bee nectar plants in Countryside Survey area vegetation plots in 2007 and extrapolates to 1km squares across GB using a generalised additive mixed model. Co-variables used in the model are Broad Habitat (the dominant broad habitat of the 1km square), air temperature, nitrogen deposition, precipitation and altitude. The map has the following layers: plantCount = a modelled estimate of the count of all bee nectar plants within a 1km by 1km square, SEM = a measure of the variance of the plantCount attribute Understanding the distribution of bee nectar plants does provide valuable information on the potential distribution of pollinators and hence pollination.

  • Data comprises of the uptake of the plant nutrient phosphorus (P) by seven common and often co-occurring herbaceous plants grown in limestone grassland soil in pots. P uptake is from one of three different sources of P that were injected into the soil, with the P sources being labelled with radio-isotope 33P, such that uptake of this could be quantified by assessing the radioactivity of the plant tissue. The plant species were grown in pots as monocultures, and as mixed communities containing all seven species. The 33P labelled P sources that were injected into the soil were orthophosphate, DNA and calcium phosphate. Assessment of the amount of 33P taken up was undertaken by harvesting and analysing plant shoots six days after the 33P source was injected into the soil. The datasets contain biomass of the harvested plant material, its radioactivity as assessed by scintillation counting, and the calculated proportion of the 33P supplied that was taken up into plant shoots. The data also contains % cover abundance values of the plant species from surveys undertaken at Wardlow Hay Cop, the limestone grassland from where the soil was sourced on which the plants were grown for the 33P addition study. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/87cdc267-a8c7-4f59-83b4-1bceaae837ad

  • The data set comprises biomass values and mineral nutrient values from experimental plots located at Sourhope, Scotland. On 5 occasions throughout each of the 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 growing seasons, grass cuttings were collected from a 50 x 50 cm cell area from each of the 4 main sub-plots within each of a set of experimental main-plots, and biomass values calculated. In addition, mineral nutrient analysis was carried out for the July 1999 grass cuttings. The work was part of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme, which was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT 8545 1963). During the experiment, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). The primary aims of the Programme were to achieve simultaneously an understanding of the biological diversity of the soil biota and the functional roles played by soil organisms in key ecological processes. In seeking to achieve these aims, 24 separate research projects were funded to study soil structure, soil processes (such as the carbon and nitrogen cycles) and the roles of micro-fauna and flora (Bacteria, Nematoda, Protozoa and Fungi), microarthropods (including Collembola and Acari), invertebrate root feeders (Tipulid, Bidionid and Scarabeid larvae), meso-fauna (such as Enchytraeidae) and macro-fauna (including Megadrili, Mollusca and Coleoptera). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1a278fbf-b8b2-472d-9100-5fb432095f63