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Newcastle University

11 record(s)

 

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  • This data contains the time series flow discharge results of hydrological simulation of the River Trent at Colwick using UKCP09 Weather Generator inputs for a variety of time slices and emissions scenarios. The Weather Generator (WG) inputs were run on a hydrological model (Leathard et al., unpublished), calibrated using the observed record 1961-2002. Each simulation is derived from 100 30-year time series of weather at the WG location 4400355 for Control, Low, Medium and High emissions scenarios for the 2020s, 2030s, 2040s, 2050s and 2080s time slices. The datasets include the relevant accompanying input WG data. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/986d3df3-d9bf-42eb-8e18-850b8d54f37b

  • This dataset consists of an ecology-focused survey of stillwaters along the rivers Yure and Swale and sediment flux measurements recorded at sites along the river Esk. The dataset results from a study which was part of the Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. The project analysed the complex network of natural and socio-economic relationships around angling in the river environment, including institutions of governance and land use practices at a range of interconnected scales. The sustainability, integrity and ecological value of river catchments are currently major issues for science. The management of freshwaters and their ecologies requires addressing processes that work across the boundaries between the natural environment, economy and society. This research focused upon these cross-cutting processes in an interdisciplinary, holistic assessment of river environments through the case of angling. Angling benefits from and influences river quality, design and management. It also links urban and rural environments and is an economic driver for the rural economy, involving about 4 million people in England and Wales and contributing 6 billion pounds to the economy through freshwater angling alone. This research aimed to provide insights into how environmental and socio-economic drivers for rural change work. This project therefore aimed to identify and analyse the complex network of influences and feedbacks around angling in the rural environment. These include natural and socio-economic influences, interdisciplinary research from both natural and social science disciplines (aquatic ecology, geomorphology, anthropology, sociology, human geography), as well as stakeholders from government, NGOs and the local community. This project focused upon three rivers in northern England - the Esk, Ure and Swale - in the course of an integrated and fine-grained study. The postal survey and business interviews from this study are available at the UK Data Archive under study number 6580 (see online resources). Further documentation for this study may be found through the RELU Knowledge Portal and the project's ESRC funding award web page (see online resources).

  • The dataset collates the relative concentration of nearly 300 antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes, and concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and potentially toxic elements (PTE; e.g., “metals”) found in soils across northeastern England during a sampling expedition in June 2016 by researchers at Newcastle University. Top soils (15cm depths; “A” horizon) were obtained from 24 rural and urban locations around Newcastle upon Tyne, representing a spectrum of landscape conditions relative to anticipated PTE contamination. There are three files related to different types of data collected: antimicrobial resistance genes, metal concentrations and PAH concentrations. The high-throughput analysis of nearly 300 AMR genes include many resistance traits representing major antibiotic classes: aminoglycosides, beta lactams, FCA (fluoroquinolone, quinolone, chloramphenicol, florfenicol and amphenicol resistance genes), MLSB (macrolide, lincosamide, streptogramin B), tetracycline, vancomycin, sulphonamide, and efflux pumps. PAH data represent the US Environmental Protection Agency priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as one of the measures of pollution impact. The other measure of impact is based on levels of twelve PTE represented by “total” and “two bio-available” concentrations, based on three extraction methods. Elements included aluminium, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, mercury, nickel, phosphorus, and zinc. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/35b49db6-8522-4c6b-a779-820268292603

  • The dataset contains 1km gridded estimates of hourly rainfall for Great-Britain for the period 1990-2014. The estimates are derived by applying the nearest neighbour interpolation method to a national database of hourly raingauge observations collated by Newcastle University and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH). These interpolated hourly estimates were then used to temporally disaggregate the CEH-GEAR daily rainfall dataset. The estimated rainfall on a given hour refers to the rainfall amount accumulated in the previous hour. The dataset also contains data indicating the distance between the grid point and the closest recording raingauge used in its interpolation. When this distance is greater than 50km, or there is zero rainfall recorded in the closest gauge, the daily value is disaggregated using a design storm. The dataset therefore also contains a flag indicating if the design storm was used. These data are provided as an indicator of the quality of the estimates. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d4ddc781-25f3-423a-bba0-747cc82dc6fa

  • This set of data comprises temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (TTGE) and soil process measurements, used to analyse the effects of perturbations (sludge and/or lime application) on the structure, community development and activity of bacteria that catalyse fundamental processes in upland soils. These were collected to address the following questions: Do soil improvement treatments select for particular components of bacterial populations and hence drive community development? If so, at what functional and phylogenetic level is this selection expressed? Can any changes in community structure be related to changes in the function of the community or is biogeochemical function independent of community structure and controlled by other mechanisms? The work was part of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme, which was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders. During the experiment, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1cebca07-dd82-4ba2-823b-274868abda42

  • These data comprise substrate utilisation profiles (using the BIOLOG gram-negative method) and moisture content data from soil sampled in an upland grassland experiment at Sourhope, Scotland. BIOLOG-GN (gram-negative) substrate utilisation analyses were used to give an indication of the ability of a subset of the bacterial community to utilise various carbon sources. These data include both temporal and spatial diversity in different depths of semi-natural grassland soil cores collected at different sample dates. Samples were collected in July 1999, October 1999, April 2000 and August 2000. Data were collected as part of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme, established in 1999 and centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute)'s farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT 8545 1963). During this time, the site was monitored to assess changes in aboveground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c42b0e3b-69e4-4941-addf-20c2e0612c58

  • This dataset contains information about moth abundance and pollen transport at sites lit by high-pressure sodium streetlights and unlit control sites. Moths were sampled at 20 matched pairs of lit and unlit sites within 40 km of Wallingford, Oxfordshire, UK (51°35' N, 1°8' W) during 2014, as part of a study of the effects of street lighting on moths and nocturnal pollen transport. Three sampling methods were used: night-time transects, light-traps and overhead flight activity surveys. Moths captured were identified, counted, and sampled for pollen transported on the proboscis, which was in turn identified and counted. The work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council (Grant ID: NE/K007394/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/31cc5cec-d33b-4dd6-a932-061ff947e708

  • These data comprise culturable cell counts in different media from soil microbial analysis within a microcosm experiment investigating moisture perturbations on microbes, set up at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Oxford. The experiment used soil turves from outside the main experimental plots at Sourhope, Scotland, collected in July 2001. Soil moisture data are also included. Data were collected as part of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme, established in 1999 and centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute)'s farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders. During this time, the site was monitored to assess changes in aboveground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/999b9188-1784-497a-bdce-8fdfbd03e15b

  • This data set provides a spatial stratification of forest cover into discrete vegetation classes according to the High Carbon Stock (HCS) Approach. The data set covers the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) project site located in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Data were collected in 2015 during a project which was included in the NERC Human-modified tropical forest (HMTF) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/81cad1ef-b5cc-4592-a71f-204a5d04b700

  • The dataset collates the relative concentration of nearly 300 antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes found in soil locations across Scotland. Soils were obtained from the National Soils Inventory of Scotland (NSIS2), from which the total community DNA were extracted and provided to assess AMR gene content. Sampling of the NSIS2 was conducted between 2007-2010 at 183 soil locations representing intersections of a 20km grid across all of Scotland. For each sample, nearly 300 AMR genes were assessed representing major antibiotic classes, and included many resistance traits: aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, FCA (fluoroquinolone, quinolone, chloramphenicol, florfenicol and amphenicol resistance genes), MLSB (macrolide, lincosamide, streptogramin B), tetracycline, vancomycin, sulphonamide, efflux pumps and integron genes. The data represent relative gene abundance, i.e., the amount of genes per “total bacteria.” Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d3498e93-4ac5-4eab-bc1a-eb2328771d24