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  • This dataset consists of landscape point feature information for points across Great Britain, surveyed in 1990. Data are presented as rows of information recorded as point features (for example individual trees, water bodies or structures), with associated plant species where relevant, within a set of 506 1km squares across Great Britain, surveyed during the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project (note: not all surveyed squares contained point features). The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to point features, habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1481bc63-80d7-4d18-bcba-8804aa0a9e1b

  • A set of data arising from a detailed ecological survey of the native Scots Pine woodland habitats within Scotland. In all, 27 woods from throughout Scotland were identified as the major remaining native pinewoods, and within each wood 16 randomly selected 200m2 plots were surveyed (26 of the woods were surveyed in 1971, with 1 extra wood surveyed in 1972). Details about the trees, ground flora, soil, habitat types as well as general plot information were collected for each plot using standardized procedures and coding systems. The survey was carried out by the Nature Conservancy, a forerunner of the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/56a48373-771c-4d4a-8b5a-45ef496c6e55

  • This dataset consists of landscape point feature information for points across Great Britain, surveyed in 1984. Data are presented as rows of information recorded as point features (for example individual trees, water bodies or structures), with associated vegetation species where relevant, within a set of 382 1km squares across Great Britain, surveyed during the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project (note: not all surveyed squares contained point features). The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to point features, habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/124b872e-036e-4dd3-8316-476b5f42c16e

  • This dataset consists of the vascular plants, bryophytes and lichens recorded in plots in 103 woodland sites surveyed across Great Britain in 1971 and again over the growing seasons of 2000, 2002 and 2003 (referred to as '2001 survey'), using exactly the same field methods. Data were collected under projects managed by The Nature Conservancy (in 1971) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (in 2001). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2d023ce9-6dbe-4b4f-a0cd-34768e1455ae

  • The dataset consists of diameter at breast height (DBH) measurements taken from trees and shrubs recorded in plots in 103 woodland sites surveyed across Great Britain in 1971 and again over the growing seasons of 2000, 2002 and 2003 (referred to as '2001 survey'), using exactly the same field methods. Data were collected under projects managed by The Nature Conservancy (in 1971) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (in 2001). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4d93f9ac-68e3-49cf-8a41-4d02a7ead81a

  • This dataset consists of landscape point feature information for points across Great Britain, surveyed in 2007. Data are presented as rows of information recorded as point features (for example individual trees, water bodies or structures), with associated species where relevant, within a set of 591 1km squares across Great Britain, surveyed during the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project (note: not all surveyed squares contained point features). The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to point features, habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/55dc5fd7-d3f7-4440-b8a7-7187f8b0550b

  • This dataset consists of landscape point feature information for points across Great Britain, surveyed in 1998. Data are presented as rows of information recorded as point features (for example individual trees, water bodies or structures), with associated plant species where relevant, within a set of 569 1km squares across Great Britain, surveyed during the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project (note: not all surveyed squares contained point features). The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to point features, habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ed10944f-40c8-4913-b3f5-13c8e844e153

  • This data set provides above-ground carbon density derived from LiDAR data over oil palm plantations in the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) project site located in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo in 2014. This includes the number of trees in plots and the average forest canopy per hectare at different heights. Data were collected during a project which was included in the NERC Human-modified tropical forest (HMTF) Programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6e18121c-2184-49df-a852-f3227c28d82f