nonCciKeyword

relative humidity

13 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 13
  • Radiosonde data were collected on and around the Antarctic Peninsula during the NERC-funded Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project. Atmospheric conditions on the upwind (western) and downwind (eastern) sides of the mountains were measured using these balloon-borne radiosondes released from the Larsen Ice shelf camp and Rothera base. A total of 52 radiosondes were launched from Rothera Station during the 2010-11 field season.

  • Radiosonde data were collected on and around the Antarctic Peninsula during the NERC-funded Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project. Atmospheric conditions on the upwind (western) and downwind (eastern) sides of the mountains were measured using these balloon-borne radiosondes released from a camp on Larsen Ice shelf camp and Rothera base. 24 radiosondes were launched from the Larsen Ice Shelf camp during the period 8-31 January 2011.

  • Meteorological data were collected between Jan and Oct 2005 from a sensor positioned on top of the FAGE container. The dataset lists temperature (degrees C), relative humidity (%), pressure (mB), wind speed (ms-1) and wind direction (degrees). Data were collected at averaged one-minute intervals. This work was carried out at Halley Station, as part of the Chemistry of the Antarctic Boundary Layer and the Interface with Snow (CHABLIS) project (2001-2006).

  • Ground-based meteorological data from Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) were collected to observe the atmospheric flow along a transect across the Antarctic Peninsula mountains around 67 degrees south during the NERC-funded Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project (2011). The AWS on the Avery Plateau was deployed on 10 Jan 2011 until early July 2011.

  • Ground-based meteorological data from Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) were collected to observe the atmospheric flow along a transect across the Antarctic Peninsula mountains around 67 degrees south during the NERC-funded Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project (2011). The AWS at Cole Peninsula was deployed on 21 Jan 2011 until 8 Jan 2012.

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset contains daily and sub-daily hydrometeorological and soil observations from COSMOS-UK (cosmic-ray soil moisture) monitoring network from October 2013 to the end of 2017. These data are from 46 sites across the UK recording a range of hydrometeorological and soil variables. Each site in the network hosts a cosmic-ray sensing probe; a novel sensor technology which can be used, in combination with hydrometeorological data, to calculate the volumetric water content of soil over a field scale. The hydrometeorological and soil data are recorded at a 30 minute resolution and they include neutron counts from the Cosmic-ray sensing probe, humidity and atmospheric pressure data that are used to derive volumetric water content at two temporal resolutions (hourly and daily). Also included are soil heat flux, air temperature, wind speed and radiation data which are used to derive potential evapotranspiration at a daily resolution. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a6012796-291c-4fd6-a7ef-6f6ed0a6cfa5

  • The meteorological data describes the air and soil temperatures, net radiation balance, down-welling photosynthetically active radiation, wind speed, wind direction and the vapour pressure deficit. Data collection was carried out at Abbotts Hall marsh from the 15th of December 2012 till the 27th of January 2015. The Abbotts Hall site is in Essex, South East England, and the meteorological tower was situated in the middle of the marsh. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/dd2f7d23-6f11-4053-bc18-3cf2431c1963

  • The eddy covariance flux data describes the fluxes of CO2, latent energy and sensible heat. It also includes ancillary data: air and soil temperatures, net radiation balance, down-welling photosynthetically active radiation, wind speed, wind direction, vapour pressure deficit, friction velocity, Monin-Obukhov stability and modelled respiration. Data collection was carried out at Cartmel Sands marsh from the 31 May 2013 till the 26 January 2015. The Cartmel Sands site is in Morecambe, North West England, and the meteorological tower was situated in the middle of the marsh. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a4192575-e91a-477d-8f64-aae3b32faf7a

  • The meteorological data describes the air and soil temperatures, net radiation balance, down-welling photosynthetically active radiation, wind speed, wind direction and the vapour pressure deficit. Data collection was carried out at Cartmel Sands marsh from the 31st of May 2013 till the 26th of January 2015. The Cartmel Sands site is in Morecambe, North West England, and the meteorological tower was situated in the middle of the marsh. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b1e2fb9c-8c34-490a-b6ae-2fdf6b460726

  • Eddy covariance (EC) observations of surface-atmosphere exchanges of sensible heat and latent heat, momentum and net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange were measured at thirty minute resolution at three Land Surface Stations in India. The dataset includes ancillary weather and soil physics observations, as well as variables describing atmospheric turbulence and the quality of the turbulent flux observations. Meteorological observations include: the net radiation and its incoming and outgoing short- and long-wave components, air temperature, barometric pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and rainfall. Soil physics observations include: Soil heat fluxes, soil temperatures and soil volumetric water content. Observations were collected under the Interaction of Convective Organization and Monsoon Precipitation, Atmosphere, Surface and Sea (INCOMPASS) Project between January 2016 and January 2018. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/78c64025-1f8d-431c-bdeb-e69a5877d2ed