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  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for linear features across Great Britain in 1990 in a vector format. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from 508 1km squares surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project, then scaling up to a national level. The data are presented as mean lengths per 1km square for seven different feature categories within 45 different land class types, based on the ITE Land Classification. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ce514508-bd25-403e-bb35-42001e3c2b25

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for linear features across Great Britain in 1984 in a vector format. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from 384 1km squares surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project, then scaling up to a national level. The data are presented as mean lengths per 1km square for seven different feature categories within 45 different land class types, based on the ITE Land Classification. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/362bff26-d2ca-4700-b1f0-22072f4bc0cc

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for linear features across Great Britain in 1984. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from 384 1km squares surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project, then scaling up to a national level. The data are presented as mean lengths for 7 different feature categories within 45 different land class types, based on the ITE Land Classification. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/271d398c-29de-4ff9-ba68-1b8e0621c6ee

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for linear features across Great Britain in 2007 in a vector format. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from 591 1km squares surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project, then scaling up to a national level. The data are presented as mean lengths per 1km square for seven different feature categories within 45 different Land Class types, based on the ITE Land Classification. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/fc65177d-b113-420e-a70b-05d3f42682d5

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for linear features across Great Britain in 1998 in a vector format. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from 569 1km squares surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project, then scaling up to a national level. The data are presented as mean lengths per 1km square for seven different feature categories within 45 different land class types, based on the ITE Land Classification. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6bc0ccb4-63c8-4121-bc4b-3c479877cff9

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for linear features across Great Britain in 1998. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from 569 1km squares surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project, then scaling up to a national level. The data are presented as mean lengths for 7 different feature categories within 45 different land class types, based on the ITE Land Classification. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/59422890-c8d3-49b8-b17e-4f5062475140

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for linear features across Great Britain in 1990. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from 508 1km squares surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project, then scaling up to a national level. The data are presented as mean lengths for 7 different feature categories within 45 different land class types, based on the ITE Land Classification. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ebbd1ba0-4497-4c80-891a-34ef3b8989cd

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for linear features across Great Britain in 2007. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from 591 1km squares surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project, then scaling up to a national level. The data are presented as mean lengths for 7 different feature categories within 45 different Land Class categories, based on the ITE Land Classification. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e687330b-a0f7-45a1-b58c-398e67da3028

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for landscape linear features across Great Britain in 1990. Data are presented as lengths of different feature categories (such as fences, walls and lines of trees), with associated species attributes, from 506 km squares, surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project (note: not all surveyed squares contained linear features). The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, vegetation species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/311daad4-bc8c-485a-bc8a-e0d054889219

  • The number and type of natural enemies of crop pests found in winter-sown oilseed rape fields (Brassica napus L.) in relation to local plant diversity (in crop and field margin) and landscape characteristics. Natural enemies and pests were collected using two methods (suction sampling and pitfall traps). Local plant diversity was assessed using quadrats in field margins and in cropped area. The presence of hedges was also recorded. Landscape characteristics include the amount of mass flowering crops, arable land, presence of patches of different grassland types (intensive, restored and species rich) and the amount of grasslands and other semi natural habitat with up to a 3km radius of the collection points. These data were collected as part of Wessex BESS project, funded by the NERC Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability research program. This dataset can be used in conjunction with other Wessex BESS WP4 datasets. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6e2be4d6-a681-4ae5-8abf-0c3fc150365d