nonCciKeyword

biodiversity

31 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 31
  • This dataset contains the codes for water laboratory analysis, sampling dates and locations for soil samples collected from the Tamar catchment in winter 2013/2014 as part of the South West project. It contains soil chemistry data for metals and mineral contents of samples soils. It should be used in conjunction with datasets describing soil bacteria and soil eukaryote operational taxonomic unit sequence data. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/de35d4ea-e75e-464c-b82f-2c2c1402cf8e

  • This dataset contains the codes for water laboratory analysis, water sample identification, sampling dates and locations for water samples collected from the Tamar catchment in winter 2013/2014 as part of the South West project. It should be used in conjunction with datasets describing water bacteria and water eukaryote operational taxonomic unit sequence data. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d36fb15b-6cfb-4488-b6b7-2b62dcf00b46

  • Data comprise measurements of plant biomass and community composition, soil microbial community composition, greenhouse gas emissions and soil carbon and nitrogen pools from a drought experiment superimposed on a the long-term Colt Park grassland restoration experiment in northern England. Rainfall was manipulated using rain-out shelters on experimental grassland plots where fertiliser application and seed addition have been managed to enhance plant species diversity. The scientific purpose was to test the hypothesis that management aimed at biodiversity restoration increases the resistance and recovery of carbon cycling to short-term summer drought. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8a41b2a2-01d7-409e-adf5-fba3f3770f29

  • Sediment cores were taken using a box corer. The sediment was subsampled using a 20 x 20 x 12 cm and incubated for 12 days. At the end of incubation, the macrofauna retained (500 um sieved) from each aquarium were fixed in 10% phosphate buffered formalin (4% formaldehyde) and stored in sealed plastic buckets for a minimum of three months. Prior to identification samples were rinsed and preserved in 70% industrial methylated spirit (IMS). Using a stereo microscope, all the animals were picked out of the residue, stored in vials containing 70% IMS, and identified to the lowest possible taxon with abundance and biomass per taxon noted. Biomass was obtained using blotted wet weight (+/- 0.0001g). The individual numbers of each taxa were counted to give abundance data. This was determined by the presence of a head in cases where specimens had been damaged. Any badly damaged specimens or parts of specimens where no head was present were separated into major group debris (annelid, mollusc and crustacea) pots and their presence noted as YES/NO for abundance). All molluscs were weighed inclusive of shells, tube dwelling polychaetes were weighed without tubes, and sediment was removed from the body cavity of specimens of Ctenodiscus crispatus prior to weighing. Samples were collected on cruises JR16006 and JR17007. Funding was provided by ''The Changing Arctic Ocean Seafloor (ChAOS) - how changing sea ice conditions impact biological communities, biogeochemical processes and ecosystems'' project (NE/N015894/1 and NE/P006426/1, 2017-2021), part of the NERC funded Changing Arctic Ocean programme.

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. A spatial indicator of ecological status for valuation of biodiversity across the UK, based on species occurrence records was developed. UK species occurrence data were collated from the Biological Records Centre (BRC). The mean ecological status was calculated across all taxonomic groups for the 2000 to 2013 time period, relative to the species richness maximums from the 1970-1990 time period, showing differences as colours. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f30e4fde-634b-402a-b807-b5188d21b998

  • This dataset contains plant community data from a hedgerow experiment investigating the effects of cutting regimes on plant species richness. There were four sites, one in Buckinghamshire, two in Oxfordshire and one in Devon. Data were collected in 2016, using 1m x 10m quadrats on each side of the hedgerow at two positions. One quadrat was situated beneath the woody vegetation of the hedge (inner) and one adjacent to the inner quadrat (outer) to sample plant communities growing beside the hedge. Percentage vegetation cover was surveyed up to a height of 80cm. The hedgerow experiment was one of three long running hedgerow experiments focusing on management to maintain and restore the hedgerow resource under agri-environment schemes. These long running experiments were funded by Defra and managed by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/cfeceb7e-b6b5-4f40-a1bc-c25f38deeb9f

  • This data includes information about nitrogen fixation, phosphatase activity, plant nitrogen and phosphorus demand and soil nitrogen and phosphorus availability of nitrogen-fixing and non-fixing trees from seven species grown in an experimental plantation at the Agua Salud Native Species Plantation, El Giral, Panama (9°12'50.15''N, 79°43'26''W). Data were collected by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and Princeton University and were analysed by the University of Leeds. This work was funded by the following organisations: Heising-Simons Foundation, Hoch Family, ForestGEO®, HSBC, Stanley Motta, Small World Institute Fund, Smithsonian Institution's Competitive Grants for Science, Smithsonian Institution's Grand Challenges, National Science Foundation (award reference: EAR-1360391), National University of Singapore, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Yale-NUS college, Princeton University, Princeton Environmental Institute, Princeton Carbon Mitigation Initiative, University of Leeds and NERC (award reference: NE/M019497/1) Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3578bae2-4b88-4b2e-93e1-6965dfe1348c

  • This dataset comprises bird abundance data collected using point count methods in Bedford, Luton and Milton Keynes in the summer of 2013. The purpose of the study was to characterise the variation in breeding bird fauna across a range of urban forms. As well as measuring the birds that were 'really' present, the survey aimed to investigate the birds detectable at times of day when people were more active and more likely to have casual encounters with them. These data were collected as part of the Fragments, Functions and Flows in Urban Ecosystem Services (F3UES) project, as part of the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) framework. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c4806e25-5325-4b01-8066-91a8fb55eb41

  • Hydrological monitoring data in this data collection result from dipwells installed at studied flood defence scheme, where electronic gauges monitored water-table fluctuations over time. Ecological data contain species sighting records of birds, butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies recorded during site visits to flood defence schemes in summer 2007. These data aim to show the relationship between water regimes and habitat potential.The study is part of the NERC Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. Agricultural Flood Defence Schemes in floodplain and coastal areas were once an important element of Government support for farmers in Britain. More recently, however, changing priorities in the countryside, concern about environmental quality and perceptions of increased flood risk in lowland areas, in part linked to climate change, have promoted a re-appraisal of land management options and policies for floodplain areas. Eight agricultural flood defence schemes, previously studied by the research team in the 1980s, have been re-examined to identify and explain changes in land and water management that have occurred over the last 40-years. This involved stakeholder and institutional analysis, farmer interviews, ecological surveys, field observations and modelling of hydrological and related ecological processes. Generic land use scenarios have been developed to consider management options that focus on single objectives, such as maximising agricultural production, maximising biodiversity and minimising flood risk in the catchment. The scenarios examined the impacts of changes in rural land use on ecosystem goods and services. The influence of agricultural policy, interacting with farmer circumstances and motivation, on land use has also been explored. The project also evaluated the impacts of the summer 2007 floods on agriculture and rural communities. The results revealed opportunities for achieving a wide range of benefits relating to farming, biodiversity, amenity, flood management, water quality and the wider rural economy. The study informed strategies for floodplain management, helping to develop approaches that are appealing to major stakeholders. Historical data on the studied flood defence schemes, farm business survey data and interviews with farmers at flood defence schemes, and interviews with farmers and rural businesses affected by summer floods in 2007 are available at the UK Data Archive under study number 6377 (see online resources). Further documentation for this study may be found through the RELU Knowledge Portal and the project's ESRC funding award web page (see online resources).

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. Fine Grain Vegetation data from the UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) terrestrial sites. These data are collected at all of ECN's terrestrial sites using a standard protocol (see supporting documentation). In this protocol, 10m x 10m plots are randomly selected within each vegetation type on the site - species presence is recorded in 40cm x 40 cm cells randomly selected within these plots. They represent continuous records every three years (some sites record data annually) from 1992 to 2012. ECN is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. It is a multi-agency programme sponsored by a consortium of fourteen government departments and agencies. These organisations contribute to the programme through funding either site monitoring and/or network co-ordination activities. These organisations are: Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Cyfoeth Naturiol Cymru - Natural Resources Wales, Defence Science & Technology Laboratory, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Environment Agency, Forestry Commission, Llywodraeth Cymru - Welsh Government, Natural England, Natural Environment Research Council, Northern Ireland Environment Agency, Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Scottish Government and Scottish Natural Heritage. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5a1efdfc-8f51-4ee9-9ed4-677bddd3f135