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  • These data describe the results of a three year (2011-2013) factorial experiment using plant-soil mesocosms testing the effects of biochar on soil biodiversity and soil carbon fluxes. The experimental design comprised three treatments: (1) biochar (absence or presence at 2% w/w); (2) plant type (barley, perennial ryegrass, or unvegetated); and (3) soil texture (sandy clay, sandy silt loam, clay loam). Ecosystem responses measured were net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) & ecosystem respiration (both g CO2 m-2 h-1) and plant biomass (g aboveground and root). Soil biological responses measured were estimates of microbial community structure (fungal-to-bacterial ratio, total phospho-lipid fatty acid (PFLA) nmol g-1 soil) and densities (g-1 soil) of nematode worms and soil microarthropods (Collembola, Acari). The experiment was done at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology in Penicuik, near Edinburgh in Scotland (UK). Soils used in the experiment were taken from the top 20 cm of the soil profile, from the James Hutton Institute’s Balruderry Farm near Dundee, Scotland, UK (56° 27’ N, 3° 4’ W). This research was funded by a Natural Environment Research Council Open CASE PhD studentship grant (NE/HO18085/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/130369e1-d9c7-436c-bd0c-1ccde4844576

  • These data are from an investigation of the effects of biochar application to soil, on soil greenhouse gas emissions and N transformations within the soil. Biochar is a carbon rich substance which is being advocated as a climate mitigation tool to increase carbon sequestration and reduce nitrous oxide emissions. The data were collected during a 15N pool dilution incubation to investigate the nitrogen transformations within biochar-amended soil following the addition of 15N-labelled ammonium nitrate. Analyses included 15N content of nitrous oxide and 15N content of soil. The N transformations were then modelled using a model for calculating nitrogen fluxes in soil using 15N tracing (FLUAZ model). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/69d89261-b7ee-4b56-bb13-1128e3c8dd93

  • Data collected during field and laboratory experiments to investigate the long-term effects of biochar application to soil on greenhouse gas emissions in a bioenergy plantation (Miscanthus X. giganteus). Analysis included monitoring of greenhouse gas emissions (carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O)), soil physical (bulk density and soil moisture ) and soil chemical analyses (total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), extractable ammonium and nitrate). Biochar was applied to plots in a bioenergy plantation and emissions of CO2, CH4 and N2O were measured over a 2 year period. In addition a laboratory incubation experiment was conducted on soil taken from the Miscanthus field amended with field-incubated biochar to assess the effect on greenhouse gas emissions. Biochar is a carbon rich substances which is being advocated as a climate mitigation tool to increase carbon sequestration and reduce nitrous oxide emissions. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e9baffd1-18ad-435e-94e2-01e49c14c547

  • Data from an investigation of the effects of biochar application to soil on greenhouse gas emissions using soil from a bioenergy crop (Miscanthus X. giganteus). Data include physical (bulk density) and chemical analyses of the soil (total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), extractable ammonium and nitrate), and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O)) during incubations. Data were collected during two incubation experiments investigating the effects of temperature, soil moisture and soil aeration on biochar induced suppression of GHG emissions. Biochar is a carbon rich substances which is being advocated as a climate mitigation tool to increase carbon sequestration and reduce nitrous oxide emissions. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2757e972-a7fe-494d-92c3-c3205dfdef19