nonCciKeyword

UK

27 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 27
  • This dataset contains data on the spatial attendance patterns of immature common guillemots (Uria aalge) at four sites in a large breeding colony. Data were collected from 25th April-12th May and 21st May-15th June 2013 at four sites on the Isle of May, Scotland. A grid was superimposed onto a photograph of each site. Grid cells were then classified as breeding or pre-breeding areas according to the presence or absence of breeding activity at any point during data collection (i.e. an egg or chick). A total of 69 randomly selected and individually-marked birds were followed using a telescope for 10 minute periods and their location in these grids was recorded every 15 seconds. This work was part of a NERC-funded PhD project looking at interactions between avian colonial social structure and tick-borne pathogen dynamics. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/dbd72bb5-4ad5-4d2f-b546-1cea672f76e8

  • The dataset contains abundance data of airborne pollen (including Anthoxanthum odoratum (sweet vernal-grass), Arrhenatherum elatius (false oat-grass), Cynosurus cristatus (crested dog’s-tail), Dactylis glomerata (cock’s-foot), Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass), Phleum pratense (Timothy), Poa pratensis (smooth meadow-grass), grass species within the genera Alopecurus/Agrostis, and one probe that was found to be degenerate and unable to discriminate grass species. Here we used qPCR to track the seasonal progression of airborne grass pollen, in time and space. To do this we collected aerial samples from thirteen sites across the UK during the pollen seasons (May to September) of 2016 and 2017. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/28208be4-0163-45e6-912c-2db205126925

  • This is a dataset obtained from analysis of lake sediment and overlying water from six sites along a depth gradient, in Loch Leven, Scotland, over a period of one year. Parameters measured from the water and included in the dataset are dissolved oxygen concentration, conductivity, pH, temperature, concentrations of three forms of phosphorus, and ammonium and silica concentrations. Chlorophyll a concentration measured from the sediment surface is included, and within the sediment concentrations of seven different forms of phosphorus are provided. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/76a2bd9a-fb02-4f37-91b9-4835eb31ab7b

  • Bird species data from the UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) lowland terrestrial sites. These data were collected, using the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO)'s Common Bird Census methodology (CBC), at ECN's lowland terrestrial sites using a standard protocol. This protocol was abandoned in favour of the Breeding Bird Survey (Rennie et al (2017) UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) bird data: 1995-2015 https://doi.org/10.5285/5886c3ba-1fa5-49c0-8da8-40e69a10d2b5) in 1999; however, some sites continued to follow this protocol for a number of years after 1999 to allow comparison with the Breeding Bird Survey data. The CBC uses a mapping method in which a series of visits are made to all parts of a defined plot during the breeding season and contacts with birds by sight or sound are recorded on large-scale maps. Information from the series of visits is combined to estimate the number of territories found. Annual data are recorded but the date ranges available are variable for each site. ECN is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. It is a multi-agency programme sponsored by a consortium of fourteen government departments and agencies. These organisations contribute to the programme through funding either site monitoring and/or network co-ordination activities. These organisations are: Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Cyfoeth Naturiol Cymru - Natural Resources Wales, Defence Science & Technology Laboratory, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Environment Agency, Forestry Commission, Llywodraeth Cymru - Welsh Government, Natural England, Natural Environment Research Council, Northern Ireland Environment Agency, Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Scottish Government and Scottish Natural Heritage. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8582a02c-b28c-45d2-afa1-c1e85fba023d

  • This is a high resolution spatial dataset of Digital Terrain Model (DTM) data in South West England. The DTM along with a Digital Surface Model (DSM) cover an area of 9424 km2 that includes all the land west of Exmouth (i.e. west of circa 3 degrees 21 minutes West). The DTM represents the topographic model (height) of the bare earth. The dataset is a part of outcomes from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology South West (SW) Project. There is also a Digital Surface Model (DSM) dataset covering the same areas available from the SW project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e2a742df-3772-481a-97d6-0de5133f4812

  • The dataset consists of location records of the Harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) in the UK. The records span from 2004 to 2016 with three records from 2003. Records were collected from several sources with the majority coming from online recording via the Harlequin Ladybird Survey website, the UK Ladybird Survey website and the iRecord Ladybird app. Other records have come from coleopterists and from a data call for the most recent ladybird atlas (e.g. local record centres, natural history societies, county Coleoptera recorders). The records include location, date and vice county, as well as life stage and colour form where available. The arrival of the Harlequin ladybird has provided a unique opportunity to study the spread of an invasive animal from the start of the invasion process. The advancements in modern technology, in particular the internet, has also provided new opportunities for recording and has enabled engagement with a far wider audience than was previously possible. This has allowed the ladybird surveys to deal efficiently with large volumes of data and verify and validate submitted records quickly. The data authors are extremely grateful to the many thousands of people across Britain who have contributed their ladybird findings to the UK Ladybird Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/70ee24a5-d19c-4ca8-a1ce-ca4b51e54933

  • This dataset is a census of the heathland and associated vegetation from Dorset, UK. The Dorset heathlands are situated in South West England, and are generally associated with free-draining and acidic soils overlying Tertiary sands and gravels. The heathlands comprise a mosaic of different vegetation types, characterised by dwarf shrub communities dominated by members of the Ericaceae (e.g. Calluna vulgaris, Erica spp.), together with areas of mire, grassland, scrub and woodland. Unless they are managed heathlands undergo succession to scrub and woodland. Therefore the majority of heathland sites are currently under some form of conservation management, which is implemented to reduce succession to scrub and woodland. Management interventions include cutting and burning of vegetation, and grazing by livestock. Individual heathland patches are also managed for ecosystem services, such as recreation and timber production, as well as biodiversity conservation. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4c347ec4-0beb-4355-9780-89dad718b2f3

  • The dataset comprises counts of four planktonic diatom taxa collected from Loch Leven from 1968-2007 by staff at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and its predecessor bodies, as part of their long-term monitoring programme of the lake. Count units are the density of cells per millilitre of water for four species; Asterionella formosa, Aulacoseira spp, Diatoma spp, Unicellular centric diatoms. Counts are of weekly to monthly frequency and from a single sampling station Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/de5ca6cc-02e9-42bc-a39e-80ec8acbffba

  • A subset of the Loch Leven long-term monitoring project dataset. This subset contains data collected from Loch Leven between 1985 and 2007 at three sampling sites in the lake. It includes results of chlorophyll, phosphorus, and silicon analyses as well as conductivity and water temperature measurements. The data relate to water samples taken at fortnightly or monthly intervals. Data available in digital form is described here. Additional data currently held as hard copy, will become available once digitised. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2969776d-0b59-4435-a746-da50b8fd62a3

  • Collated indices are a relative measure of butterfly abundance across monitored sites in the UK, calculated from data collected by the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS). Collated indices are calculated annually for each individual butterfly species that has been recorded on five or more sites in that year. Based on this criterion collated indices have been calculated for the entire UKBMS time series from 1976 to the current year for the majority of species. For some rarer species the time series starts in a later year due to lack of data. Collated indices are calculated using a statistical model that accounts for missing data. The number of sites for each species ranges from 5 to several hundred and varies from year to year. Since 2008 more than 1,000 sites have been monitored across the UK each year. Collated indices are calculated so that we can determine how butterfly populations are changing over time across the UK. This data can be used, for example, to determine where to target conservation efforts and to measure the condition of the UK countryside. Butterflies are recognised as important indicators of biodiversity and environmental change (e.g. as official UK Biodiversity Indicators), and have been used in numerous research studies to understand the impacts of changes in climate and the extent and condition of habitats. Although the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) and Butterfly Conservation (BC) are responsible for the calculation and interpretation of the Collated indices, the collection of the data used in their creation is ultimately reliant on a large volunteer community. The UKBMS is funded by a consortium of organisations led by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). This dataset is updated annually and more recent versions of the UKBMS collated indices are available. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/560b320e-7859-449a-b565-f80e369ceb0a