nonCciKeyword

Surface elevation

9 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 9 / 9
  • A time series of the mean surface elevation along a transect across Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier from Feb 2012 to May 2018. Funding: Data were processed under NERC project CALISMO NE/P011365/1. Data were acquired under NERC project NE/I007148/1. Data were supplied by DLR.

  • In 2011, aerogeophysics data were acquired over Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica on a grid comprising 30 transverse lines across the glacier, each around 20 km long, and with a spacing of roughly 500 m between the lines. The orientation of the lines was selected to be perpendicular to the surface features visible in satellite images in the central part of the ice shelf. Elevation of the ice-surface directly beneath the aircraft was simultaneously measured using a nadir-pointing laser altimeter. We present here the processed bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding collected using the BAS PASIN radar system. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data.

  • An airborne radar survey was flown as part of the GRADES-IMAGE project funded by BAS over the Evans Ice stream/Carson Inlet region mainly to image englacial layers and bedrock topography during the 2006/07 field season. Aeromagnetic data were also opportunistically collected. We present here the bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding collected using the BAS PASIN radar depth sounding system. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data.

  • The survey collected a total of 11,500 km of data along 22 lines, spaced 12 km apart and oriented perpendicular to the strike of both the Bouguer anomaly field, as derived from land data (McGibbon and Smith, 1991), and the major sub-ice topographical features (Doake et al., 1983). The speed of the aircraft was set to produce a sample spacing of about 60 m and the data were collected at heights between 1600 and 2000 m above sea level. The gravity signal was recorded using a LaCoste and Romberg air/sea gravimeter, S-83, which has been kindly loaned to BAS by the Hydrographic Office of the Royal Navy. The meter was modified by the ZLS company for use in an aircraft. The equipment was deployed in a BAS De-Havilland Twin Otter aircraft. Differential, dual frequency, carrier phase, GPS measurements of the aircraft''s motion were made using Trimble and Ashtech geodetic receivers and antennas. Ice thickness data were obtained using a BAS-built, radio echo sounding system (Corr and Popple, 1994). Ice-bottom returns over most of the survey area were obtained at a sample spacing of approximately 28 m. GPS measurements were tied into base stations in International Terrain Reference Frame network (Dietrich et al., 1998) and gravity measurements to base stations in the IGSN71 net (Jones and Ferris, 1999). We present here the processed bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding collected using the BAS PASIN radar system. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data.

  • A British Antarctic Survey Twin Otter and survey team acquired 8,300 line-km of aerogeophysics data during the Austral summer of 1998/99. Gravity and radio-echo data were acquired simultaneously with the magnetic data at a compromise constant barometric height of 2,200 m, which provides a terrain clearance of 100 m over the highest peaks. Two separate surveys were conducted; one at 5 km line spacing (tie lines at 20 km) over and stretching beyond the southern extent of the Forrestal range (main survey), and one at 2 km line spacing (tie lines at 8 km) covering the Dufek Massif (detailed survey). Ashtech Z12 dual frequency GPS receivers were used for survey navigation. Pseudorange data were supplied to a Picodas PNAV navigation interface computer, which was used to guide the pilot along the pre-planned survey lines. The actual flight path was recovered, using carrier-phase, continuous, kinematic GPS processing techniques. All pseudorange navigation data were recorded at 1 Hz on a Picodas PDAS 1000, PC-based data acquisition system. We present here the processed bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding collected using the BAS PASIN radar system. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data.

  • This is a collection of all vintage BAS radar data that went into BEDMAP 1 (Lythe and Vaughan, 2001) that have not been released so far as line data. BEDMAP data descries the thickness of the Antarctic ice sheet. They have been collected on surveys undertaken over the past 50 years and brought together into a single database. These data have allowed the compilation of a suite of seamless digital topographic models for the Antarctic continent and surrounding ocean. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data.

  • The dataset details global positioning system (GPS) locations recorded for survey quadrats at six UK saltmarsh sites. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England, each of these sites consisted of a salt marsh area and adjacent mudflat area. Each site comprised 22 quadrats on the unvegetated mudflat and 22 quadrats on the salt marsh. The locations indicated by this dataset correspond to the south-east corner of the quadrats which were 1m square and oriented with their sides aligned North-South and East-West. We combined spatial data relating to the environs of the study sites from a number of sources (Ordnance Survey Digital Terrain Models, Ordnance Survey Boundary Line, Environment Agency Saltmarsh Extents, Natural England Priority Habitat Inventory). These were rasterised and quadrat values were extracted on a pointwise basis for elevation and proximity (distance to creek, habitat edge and high water mark). Tidal height was calculated with reference to the relevant Tidal Gauge and Admiralty Standard Port information. This data was derived as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/78a2cab5-dca5-411b-ac5b-c2c080928b1d

  • The dataset details global positioning system (GPS) locations recorded for survey quadrats at six UK saltmarsh sites. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England, each of these sites consisted of a salt marsh area and adjacent mudflat area. Each site comprised 22 quadrats on the unvegetated mudflat and 22 quadrats on the salt marsh. The locations indicated by this dataset correspond to the south-east corner of the quadrats which were 1m square and oriented with their sides aligned North-South and East-West. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e07386ba-f7a8-490d-99f7-1ce1ae14e95d

  • The dataset details surface elevation and sedimentation measurements across five UK saltmarsh sites. Two of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England, each of these sites consisted of a saltmarsh area and adjacent mudflat area. Rod Sedimentation-Erosion Tables (rSETs) were installed at different distances from the vegetated margin. Three rSETs were deployed for each Essex site and four for the Morecambe sites. rSET benchmarks were installed with associated marker horizons to evaluate surface elevation changes and surface accretion respectively. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b71f1244-3bc2-4b52-bf64-f3e479860e28