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Sourhope

52 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 52
  • This resource is the raw data from a topographic survey of the Sourhope field experiment site, conducted by the Department of Environmental Science, University of Stirling in April and May 2000. The data are available to match to other data sets from the field site, or to analyse in more detail. The data were collected as part of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme, centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute)'s farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT8545019630). During this time, the site was monitored to assess changes in above ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d5b78255-b834-485e-8aa4-590ddf604bfd

  • This dataset includes: biomass data for roots, shoots and litter in soil core samples, vegetation species abundance data for sampled soil blocks, and soil profile descriptions (horizon types & depths) with corresponding pH and moisture content values by horizon for soil blocks. All data were collected during a joint sampling event, held at Sourhope, Scotland, where co-ordinated sampling took place on the 27-28th July 2000 involving groups from within the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme. A single block of soil was extracted from each of the sub-plots ('S' 'T' 'U' 'V') from within each of the main-plots (excluding Control 2 plots) at the field experiment site (see supporting information), and various baseline measurements were recorded. The soil blocks were divided up and sub-samples given to groups participating in the co-ordinated sampling, providing a range of information covering various aspects of soil research that can be linked to the same point in time and space. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute)'s farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT 8545 1963). During this time, the site was monitored to assess changes in aboveground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4c0fd1b5-2934-4bd4-b444-1a10499ee900

  • These data comprise substrate utilisation profiles (using the BIOLOG gram-negative method) and moisture content data from soil sampled in an upland grassland experiment at Sourhope, Scotland. BIOLOG-GN (gram-negative) substrate utilisation analyses were used to give an indication of the ability of a subset of the bacterial community to utilise various carbon sources. These data include both temporal and spatial diversity in different depths of semi-natural grassland soil cores collected at different sample dates. Samples were collected in July 1999, October 1999, April 2000 and August 2000. Data were collected as part of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme, established in 1999 and centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute)'s farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT 8545 1963). During this time, the site was monitored to assess changes in aboveground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c42b0e3b-69e4-4941-addf-20c2e0612c58

  • This set of data describes protozoa abundance and diversity in samples taken at the Sourhope experimental site in 1999 and 2000 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and the University of Glasgow. Data were collected during a project funded under the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT8545019630). During the experiment, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a5737c31-5c8d-43f3-980a-4736510d6b05

  • This set of data describes earthworm diversity in soil samples taken at the Sourhope experimental site in 1999 and 2001 by the Universities of Glasgow and Dundee. Data were collected during a project funded under the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT 8545 1963). During the experiment, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/649d6c94-1fe9-4b39-914a-d1d59bbbd419

  • This dataset comprises botanical composition and earthworm species and abundance data, sampled from a mesocosm experiment (named Sweethope) in October 2001. The mesocosm site replicated the layout of the main experimental plots at the NERC Soil Biodiversity site at Sourhope, Scotland and was established to avoid contaminating the main Sourhope plots. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT 8545 1963). During the experiment, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ca8f85c5-0595-4fda-80e5-4f41839effed

  • This dataset comprises enchytraeid worm abundance and Delta 13C values from enchytraeid cholesterol. The data were collected as a component of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme, consisting of a one year study of the diversity and activity of Enchytraeid worms, small relatives of the earthworm. These worms are very common in upland soils and often outweigh all other fauna, including sheep. The project focused on investigating the importance of Enchytraeid species, or group diversity, in maintaining soil carbon cycling. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute)'s farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders. During this time, the site was monitored to assess changes in aboveground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0a443a55-28b6-4d82-9042-5a35bfdbebe0

  • This set of data comprises substrate utilisation profiles for saprotrophic fungi (using the commercially available BIOLOG plate method) and moisture content data from soils sampled from experimental plots at Sourhope, Scotland. The data were collected in order to determine how the high species richness of decomposer (saprotrophic) fungi and their relative frequencies of occurrence influence the decomposition of organic matter. Data were collected during a project funded under the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme, established in 1999 and centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT8545019630). During the experiment, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/662b8cb3-afca-43c6-a6e8-e56fcf94626b

  • Data comprises abundance measures of mites, collembola and plant biomass collected from a field experiment based at Sourhope. Experimental plots varied in nitrogen addition treatment and level of ground disturbance. The data were collected as a component of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme, established in 1999 and centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute)'s farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders. During this time, the site was monitored to assess changes in aboveground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b0c85bce-6fe2-4c1e-9750-6f990532eafc

  • These data comprise arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi diversity data from Sourhope field experiment site. AM fungi are biotrophic symbionts colonizing the majority of land plants, and are of major importance in plant nutrient supply. Using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) strategy, the diversity of AM fungi was assessed in 89 roots of three grass species (Agrostis capillaris, Festuca rubra, Poa pratensis) that co-occurred in the same plots of the Sourhope field experiment. The impact of different soil amendments (nitrogen, lime, nitrogen and lime) and insecticide application on AM fungal community was also recorded. Data were collected during a project funded under the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme, established in 1999 and centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT 8545 1963). During the experiment, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5aa0e9ee-9604-4cba-a1ae-5d6708cf6438