nonCciKeyword

Soil

209 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 209
  • [This dataset is embargoed until March 3, 2022]. This dataset contains time series observations of surface-atmosphere exchanges of net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange (NEE), sensible heat (H) and latent heat (LE), and momentum (τ) for a managed lowland deep peat soil in the East Anglian Fens, England, UK. The site is managed for the production of horticultural salad crops. Measurements were made between the 22nd June 2012 and 1st January 2020 during which lettuce, leek, celery, sugar beet and potatoes crops were grown on the field. Turbulent flux densities were monitored using the micrometeorological eddy covariance (EC) technique. The dataset includes ancillary weather and soil physics observations, as well as variables describing atmospheric turbulence and the quality of the turbulent flux observations. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/13896773-01e5-48e6-bfab-c319de46b221

  • This dataset consists of soil physico-chemical properties (pH, loss on ignition, bulk density, moisture content, carbon stock and concentration, total nitrogen, Olsen phosphorus) from soils sampled from up to 591 1km squares across Great Britain in 2007. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Please note: the use of Olsen P data, particularly in relation to acidic soils, is controversial. Please ensure these data are suitable for your requirements and exercise caution in their use. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/79669141-cde5-49f0-b24d-f3c6a1a52db8

  • This dataset contains time series observations of surface-atmosphere exchanges of net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange (NEE), sensible heat (H) and latent heat (LE), and momentum (τ) measured at a field of winter wheat in Lincolnshire, UK during the 2012 growing season. Turbulent flux densities were monitored using the micrometeorological eddy covariance (EC) technique between 5th April 2012 and 8th August 2012. The dataset includes ancillary weather and soil physics observations, as well as variables describing atmospheric turbulence and the quality of the turbulent flux observations. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c00ac145-6a55-4698-a6ed-13c95d178c96

  • Data comprise bulk density, loss on ignition, carbon content of peat, nitrogen content of peat, total phosphorus content of peat, soil 13 carbon content and soil 14 carbon content from samples collected during a peat survey in England, Scotland and Wales during 2014. The study was funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council under the Macronutrient Cycling Research Programme, as part of the Long-Term, Large-Scale (LTLS) project (Grant no. NE/J011533/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9305b068-f417-4659-9966-d9456f22c331

  • Data comprises of the uptake of the plant nutrient phosphorus (P) by seven common and often co-occurring herbaceous plants grown in limestone grassland soil in pots. P uptake is from one of three different sources of P that were injected into the soil, with the P sources being labelled with radio-isotope 33P, such that uptake of this could be quantified by assessing the radioactivity of the plant tissue. The plant species were grown in pots as monocultures, and as mixed communities containing all seven species. The 33P labelled P sources that were injected into the soil were orthophosphate, DNA and calcium phosphate. Assessment of the amount of 33P taken up was undertaken by harvesting and analysing plant shoots six days after the 33P source was injected into the soil. The datasets contain biomass of the harvested plant material, its radioactivity as assessed by scintillation counting, and the calculated proportion of the 33P supplied that was taken up into plant shoots. The data also contains % cover abundance values of the plant species from surveys undertaken at Wardlow Hay Cop, the limestone grassland from where the soil was sourced on which the plants were grown for the 33P addition study. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/87cdc267-a8c7-4f59-83b4-1bceaae837ad

  • The data consists of potential phosphatase activity released by fine roots in old growth forests in Central Amazon. Fine roots younger than three months were sampled using the ingrowth core technique in a large-scale nutrient fertilisation experiment. Phosphatase activity is given as a mean of the plant community per plot, where five points inside each plot were sampled and separated in two different soil layers (0-10 and 10-30cm). Samples were collected in February 2018, eight months after the nutrient fertilisation started at the AFEX project area in Manaus, Brazil at the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project (BDFFP/ INPA). The study was funded by NERC, BDFFP (logistical support) and Brazilian government (student scholarship) Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6529004d-b6e8-429d-ac68-0f5324d7e5d0

  • Summary output data (including soil organic carbon concentration, nitrogen, available water and carbon dioxide) from simulations of soil in a small agricultural catchment (Sunjia) in Southeast China (Jianxi province). The simulations were performed using the ECOSSE model; a pool-based carbon and nitrogen turnover model. The simulations were performed using soil and climate input data from the research farm. Input data for the simulations were provided by the soil science department of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Simulations were conducted in 2017. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2ce71612-df48-40f2-9402-03d93104c623

  • This dataset contains time series observations of surface-atmosphere exchanges of net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange (NEE), sensible heat (H) and latent heat (LE), and momentum (τ) measured at an area of organically managed grassland located on the Berkshire Downs, UK. Turbulent flux densities were monitored using the micrometeorological eddy covariance (EC) technique between 1st January 2017 and 31st July 2019. The dataset includes ancillary weather and soil physics observations, as well as variables describing atmospheric turbulence and the quality of the turbulent flux observations. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5a93161f-0124-4650-a2c9-7e8aaea7e6bb

  • This dataset consists of metal concentrations measured from soils sampled across Great Britain in 1998. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/def15f47-6aba-43db-a833-5844628a658b

  • The dataset collates the relative concentration of nearly 300 antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes found in soil locations across Scotland. Soils were obtained from the National Soils Inventory of Scotland (NSIS2), from which the total community DNA were extracted and provided to assess AMR gene content. Sampling of the NSIS2 was conducted between 2007-2010 at 183 soil locations representing intersections of a 20km grid across all of Scotland. For each sample, nearly 300 AMR genes were assessed representing major antibiotic classes, and included many resistance traits: aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, FCA (fluoroquinolone, quinolone, chloramphenicol, florfenicol and amphenicol resistance genes), MLSB (macrolide, lincosamide, streptogramin B), tetracycline, vancomycin, sulphonamide, efflux pumps and integron genes. The data represent relative gene abundance, i.e., the amount of genes per “total bacteria.” Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d3498e93-4ac5-4eab-bc1a-eb2328771d24