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222 record(s)

 

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  • The Changing Arctic Ocean (CAO) data set comprises hydrographic data, including measurements of temperature, salinity and pigments. The study area was the Arctic Ocean, more specifically the Barents Sea. The data were collected by a research cruise from June to August 2016. Shipboard data collection involved the deployment of conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) packages. The CAO programme aims to understand the changes in the Arctic marine ecosystem in a quantifiable way, which will allow computer models to help predict the consequences of these changes on, for example, surface ocean productivity, species distributions, food webs and ecosystems, and the services they provide (ecosystem services) . It is a NERC funded programme that draws on collaboration between the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS), University of Liverpool (UoL), University of Leeds (ULeeds), University of Edinburgh, University of Oxford, Scottish Universities Environmental Research centre (SUERC), University of Strathclyde, University of St. Andrews, University of Southampton, University of Manchester, Durham University, University of Bristol, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Sir Alister Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science (SAHFOS), National Oceanography Centre (NOC), Newcastle University, British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML), . The programme is divided in four projects with the following Principal Investigators : Arctic PRIZE (Arctic productivity in the seasonal ice zone), led by Finlo Cottier from SAMS, ARISE (Can we detect changes in Arctic ecosystems?), led by Claire Mahaffey from UoL, ChAOS (The Changing Arctic Ocean Seafloor), led by Christian Maerz from ULeeds and DIAPOD (Mechanistic understanding of the role of diatoms in the success of the Arctic Calanus complex and implications for a warmer Arctic), led by David Pond from SAMS. The majority of the data will be managed by the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC), with a minority of data sets (mainly related to biology) being submitted to the Polar Data Centre (BAS-PDC).

  • The Marine Environment Monitoring and Assessment National database (MERMAN) is a national database which holds and provides access to data collected under the Clean Safe Seas Environmental Monitoring Programme (CSEMP) formerly the National Marine Monitoring Programme (NMMP). The data collected are the responsibility of the Competent Monitoring Authorities (CMAs) who collect the samples from stations in UK waters using water sampling techniques, trawls, nets or grabs. The CMAs then send the collected samples to accredited laboratories where they are analysed. A weighting is calculated, based on the quality of the analysis. The weighting score incorporates the laboratory accreditation, reference material, inter-laboratory comparisons, detection limits, uncertainties and standard deviations. Where data do not meet a threshold score they are given a status of ‘FAIL’ and although they are stored they are not made available to external users. The contaminants and biological effects in biota data start in 1987 with greater use of the database occurring from 1997 onwards. Data are submitted by the CMAs annually and an annual submission may include updates to legacy data to provide additional data or improve data/metadata. The data held in MERMAN fulfils the UK's mandatory monitoring requirements under the Oslo and Paris Convention (OSPAR) Joint Assessments and Monitoring Programme (JAMP). These data are used in support of European Commission (EC) directives and national assessments, such as Charting Progress 2 and are also supplied to the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNET).

  • The 26 North dataset comprises moored temperature, conductivity and salinity, current velocity, acoustic travel time and bottom pressure time series. Data have been collected in the North Atlantic between latitudes of 23.7 degrees N and 28 degrees N in three sub -arrays at the Western Boundary (76.9 degrees W to 69.4 degrees W), Mid-Atlantic Ridge (52.1 degrees W to 40.9 degrees W) and Eastern Boundary (24.2 degrees W to 12.2 degrees W ). A number of instrumented moorings, some of which are full depth, have been deployed in each sub-array. Data have been collected since February 2004 and the moorings have been turned around every year. Data have been collected using a variety of moored instrumentation including conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensors, current meters, Bottom Pressure Recorders (BPR), Inverted Echo Sounders (IES) and Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). Data are collected in order to calculate and continuously monitor the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) and provide a long term time series of the strength of the MOC. The 26 North dataset comprises moored data collected by the RAPID: monitoring the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation at 26.5 degrees N since 2004 (RAPIDMOC) project and the Meridional Overturning Circulation and Heat-flux Array (MOCHA) project. Data are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre.

  • This dataset comprises 8 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, in September 1998 from stations off the coast of the Iberian Peninsula. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research as part of the Ocean Margin Exchange (OMEX) II project.

  • This dataset comprises 4 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, in September 1995 from stations in the Ria de Vigo between 42 - 43 N, 8.5 - 9.5 W. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Institute of Marine Research, Vigo as part of the Ocean Margin Exchange (OMEX) I project.

  • The dataset comprises 95 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the South West Atlantic Ocean (limit 20W) area specifically at South Georgia, from December 1989 to January 1990. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the British Antarctic Survey.

  • This dataset comprises 11 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, during August - September 1995 from stations in the north east Atlantic Ocean between 45 - 50 N, 5 - 15 W. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Institute of Marine Research, Norway as part of the Ocean Margin Exchange (OMEX) I project.

  • This dataset comprises 4 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, in July 1995 from stations in the Ria de Vigo between 42 - 43 N, 8.5 - 9.5 W. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Institute of Marine Research, Vigo as part of the Ocean Margin Exchange (OMEX) I project.

  • This dataset comprises 2 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, in September 1994 from stations in the Ria de Vigo between 42 - 43 N, 8.5 - 9.5 W. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Institute of Marine Research, Vigo as part of the Ocean Margin Exchange (OMEX) I project.

  • The Marine Environment Monitoring and Assessment National database (MERMAN) is a national database which holds and provides access to data collected under the Clean Safe Seas Environmental Monitoring Programme (CSEMP) formerly the National Marine Monitoring Programme (NMMP). The data collected are the responsibility of the Competent Monitoring Authorities (CMAs) who collect the samples from stations in UK waters using water sampling techniques, trawls, nets or grabs. The CMAs then send the collected samples to accredited laboratories where they are analysed. A weighting is calculated, based on the quality of the analysis. The weighting score incorporates the laboratory accreditation, reference material, inter-laboratory comparisons, detection limits, uncertainties and standard deviations. Where data do not meet a threshold score they are given a status of ‘FAIL’ and although they are stored they are not made available to external users. The MERMAN contaminants, nutrients, biological and eutrophication effects in water data start in 1999. Data are submitted by the CMAs annually and an annual submission may include updates to legacy data to provide additional data or improve data/metadata. The data held in MERMAN fulfils the UK's mandatory monitoring requirements under the Oslo and Paris Convention (OSPAR) Joint Assessments and Monitoring Programme (JAMP). These data are used in support of European Commission (EC) directives and national assessments, such as Charting Progress 2 and are also supplied to the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNET).