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  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. The leaf phenology product presented here shows the amplitude of annual cycles observed in MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) 16-day time-series of 2000 to 2013 for Meso- and South America. The values given represent a conservative measure of the amplitude after the annual cycle was identified and tested for significance by means of the Fourier Transform. The amplitude was derived for four sets of vegtation indices (VI) time-series based on the MODIS VI products (500m MOD13A1; 1000m MOD13A2). The amplitude value can be interpreted as the degree in which the life cycles of individual leaves of plants observed within a pixel are synchronised. In other words, given the local variation in environment and climate and the diversity of species leaf life cycle strategies, an image pixel will represent vegetation communities behaving between two extremes: * well synchronized, where the leaf bud burst and senescence of the individual plants within the pixel occurs near simultaneously, yielding a high amplitude value. Often this matches with an area of low species diversity (e.g. arable land) or with areas where the growth of all plants is controlled by the same driver (e.g. precipitation). * poorly synchronized, where the leaf bud burst and senescence of individual plants within a pixel occurs at different times of the year, yielding a low amplitude value. Often this matches with an area of high species diversity and/or where several drivers could be controlling growth. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/36795e9d-2380-465c-947b-3c9ae26f92d0

  • The leaf phenology product presented here shows the amplitude of annual cycles observed in MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) 16-day time-series of 2000 to 2013 for Meso- and South America. The values given represent a conservative measure of the amplitude after the annual cycle was identified and tested for significance by means of the Lomb-Scargle Transform. The amplitude was derived for four sets of vegtation indices (VI) time-series based on the MODIS VI products (500m MOD13A1; 1000m MOD13A2). The amplitude value can be interpreted as the degree in which the life cycles of individual leaves of plants observed within a pixel are synchronised. In other words, given the local variation in environment and climate and the diversity of species leaf life cycle strategies, an image pixel will represent vegetation communities behaving between two extremes: * well synchronized, where the leaf bud burst and senescence of the individual plants within the pixel occurs near simultaneously, yielding a high amplitude value. Often this matches with an area of low species diversity (e.g. arable land) or with areas where the growth of all plants is controlled by the same driver (e.g. precipitation). * poorly synchronized, where the leaf bud burst and senescence of individual plants within a pixel occurs at different times of the year, yielding a low amplitude value. Often this matches with an area of high species diversity and/or where several drivers could be controlling growth. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/dae416b4-3762-45bd-ae14-c554883d482c

  • [This dataset is embargoed until February 1, 2021]. Data collected from an experimental inoculation study of house finches with isolates of the bacterial pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, conducted at Arizona State University, USA in 2015. Data include multiple measurements of disease progression obtained as measures of body mass, symptoms severity scores and infection status. The birds were caught from wild-populations and brought back into the laboratory in July 2015 to allow them to acclimate to laboratory conditions before study onset in October 2015. The experiment was then run for 34-days. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ef96a901-a728-493d-8648-641e450d555d

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset comprises information of location and cytotype of over 1300 samples of Campanula rotundifolia L. from the northern hemisphere (mostly from Britain and Ireland) and data from a common garden study in which British and Irish cytotypes were grown together and their flowering phenology and growth were assessed. Campanula rotundifolia L. is a widespread polyploid perennial herbaceous plant, with diploid, tetraploid, pentaploid and hexaploid cytotypes. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f27cf73b-65f0-4838-b6ad-efe865a4188c

  • Data were collected to determine the geographic distribution of different cytotypes of Campanula rotundifolia L. Most sampling concentrated on Britain and Ireland, but samples from mainland Europe, the Russian Federation and North America were also analysed. Following these observations, a common garden study of tetraploid, pentaploid and hexaploid cytotypes representative of Britain and Ireland was set up at a CEH Edinburgh (where the local cytotype is tetraploid), to determine whether climatic factors were limiting the distribution of the hexaploid cytotype through effects on growth, survival or flowering phenology. The geographic distribution study ran from 2006-2019. The common garden study ran from 2008-2010. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/673b2b31-562c-4604-8776-4a92988867b8

  • This dataset contains first egg dates for great tits (Parus major) and blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) from Monks Wood, Brampton Wood and Wennington Wood in Cambridgeshire, England, over a 23 year period. The dataset runs from the breeding season in 1993 to the end of the breeding season in 2015. The first egg dates are presented as the number of days from the start date which was set as the 1st April each year. Because the timing of breeding of great tits and blue tits is influenced in large part by ambient temperature and the phenology of their main prey, the data were collected as a measure of spring phenology. These data comprise part of a larger long-term study of the influence of habitat (extent, structure and composition) and landscape factors on abundance, distribution and breeding success of woodland birds in English lowland deciduous woodland. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2efa9bf4-e5c0-42f9-8fcb-90dca2bb9c66

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset contains first egg dates for great tits (Parus major) and blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) from Monks Wood, Brampton Wood and Wennington Wood in Cambridgeshire, England, over a 22 year period. The dataset runs from the breeding season in 1993 to the end of the breeding season in 2014. The first egg dates are presented as the number of days from the start date which was set as the 1st April each year. Because the timing of breeding of great tits and blue tits is influenced in large part by ambient temperature and the phenology of their main prey, the data were collected as a measure of spring phenology. These data comprise part of a larger long-term study of the influence of habitat (extent, structure and composition) and landscape factors on abundance, distribution and breeding success of woodland birds in English lowland deciduous woodland. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2024e114-6a7e-437d-b3a6-4929967eb1aa