nonCciKeyword

Nitrogen

13 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 13
  • Gridded model estimates of nitrate-N stored in the vadose (unsaturated) zone. This dataset presents annual gridded estimates of nitrate stored in the vadose zone for 1900 - 2000 on a 0.5 degree grid (units: kg N/grid cell). Data are supplied as a single netCDF for all years. This data was derived by Ascott et al. (2017). Global models of depth to groundwater table, subsurface porosity and groundwater recharge were used to derive estimates of nitrate travel time in the vadose zone. The travel time was combined with annual estimates of nitrate leaching from the base of the soil zone for 1900 - 2000 to estimate total nitrate stored in the vadose zone. For full details of the dataset derivation, please refer to Ascott et al. (2017). Ascott, M.J., Gooddy, D.C., Wang, L., Stuart, M.E., Lewis, M.A., Ward, R.S. and Binley, A.M. (2017) Global patterns of nitrate storage in the vadose zone. Nature Communications 8(1), 1416.

  • [This dataset is embargoed until April 1, 2021]. This dataset contains total nitrogen (N) deposition at a 1km x 1km resolution in the UK, annually from 1990 to 2017. N deposition is presented as reduced N (NHx) and oxidised N (NOy), both of which are split into wet and dry portions. Values are given for forest and moorland land cover, as well as a weighted mean to each grid cell (‘grid average’).

  • This product consists of maps of predicted average annual application rates of three different inorganic chemical fertilisers – nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) - in England across a six-year period (2010-2015). The estimates, along with their respective estimates of uncertainty, are provided at a 1 km x 1 km resolution. These data were modelled from Defra British Survey of Fertiliser Practice (BSFP) data using a spatial interpolation procedure. These maps were created under the NERC funded ASSIST (Achieving Sustainable Agricultural Systems) project to enable exploration of the impacts of agrochemical usage on the environment, enabling farmers and policymakers to implement better, more sustainable agricultural practices. Different uses and potential applications of the produced maps, including the following: 1) Modelling nutrient fate to predict impacts of changes in farming practices (intensification/extensification) on nutrient runoff to water; 2) Estimating greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions due to fertiliser application to crops and grassland (linked with air quality impacts); 3) Quantifying past and future impacts of eutrophication and/or agricultural management on agricultural ecosystems and indicators such as arable plants, farmland birds, pollinators; 4) Linking crop growth models to predict areas where better nutrient management may improve yields; 5) Improving policies aimed at mitigating negative impacts of fertiliser use (e.g. catchment sensitive farming to reduce pollution and/or improve water quality). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/15f415db-e87b-4ab5-a2fb-37a78e7bf051

  • Topsoil nutrient data - total nitrogen (N) concentration (%), C:N ratio and Olsen-Phosphorus (mg/kg). Data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth. Cores from 256 1km x 1km squares across Great Britain were analysed in 2007. For total N concentration (and therefore C:N ratio), a total of 1024 cores were analysed, and for Olsen-P, a total of 1054 cores were analysed. See Emmett et al. 2010 for further details of sampling and methods (http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/5201/1/CS_UK_2007_TR3%5B1%5D.pdf). Estimates of mean values within selected habitats and parent material characteristics across GB were made using Countryside Survey (CS) data from 1978, 1998 and 2007 using a mixed model approach. The estimated means of habitat/parent material combinations are modelled on dominant habitat and parent material characteristics derived from the Land Cover Map 2007 and Parent Material Model 2009, respectively. The parent material characteristic used was that which minimised AIC in each model (see Dataset Documentation). Please see Scott, 2008 for further details of similar statistical analysis (http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/5202/1/CS_UK_2007_TR4%5B1%5D.pdf). Areas, such as urban and littoral rock, are not sampled by CS and therefore have no associated data. Also, in some circumstances sample sizes for particular habitat / parent material combinations were insufficient to estimate mean values. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7055965b-7fe5-442b-902d-63193cbe001c

  • [This dataset is embargoed until December 13, 2020]. The data nitrogen gene data, soil biodiversity indices and microbial community composition, for three soil depths (0-15, 15-30 and 30-60 cm) from a three-cut silage plot trial located at three grassland sites within the UK collected between April 2016 and October 2016. The sites were Rothamsted Research at North Wyke in Devon, Bangor University at Henfaes Research Station in North Wales and Easter Bush in Scotland. At each site measurements were taken from 16 plots, organised within a randomised complete block design where 4 plots did not receive fertilizers (controls), 4 plots received urea only, 4 plots received urea and urea-inhibitors, and 4 plots received ammonium-nitrate (Nitram). Fertiliser was applied three times and three cuts were performed, all parameters measured were following a fertiliser application. Samples were taken before the fertilizer additions, at peak growth and before the last silage cut. Soil chemical parameters were: soil nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen, amino acids and peptides, soil organic matter content as loss-on-ignition, pH, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, permanganate oxdisable carbon citric acid extractable phosphorous, Olsen-P and total carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. Soil biological measure were: microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen. Soil physico-chemical parameters were measured on the same samples and are available in a related dataset measured on the same soil samples and are presented in a separate dataset in the project data series (https://catalogue.ceh.ac.uk/id/7a87dde4-b54e-49b0-8751-1d59e8aebb90). Measurements were undertaken by members of staff from the Centre of Ecology & Hydrology (Bangor, Edinburgh, Lancaster, Wallingford), Bangor University, School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography and Rothamsted Research, Sustainable Agricultural Sciences, North Wyke. Data was collected for the Newton Fund project “UK-China Virtual Joint Centre for Improved Nitrogen Agronomy”. Funded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and NERC - Ref BB/N013468/1 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/59f81d41-a789-4c5c-8ab8-36baa7ac2c55

  • [This dataset is embargoed until November 30, 2020]. The data consist of soil physicochemical and biological data for three soil depths (0-15, 15-30 and 30-60 cm) from a three-cut silage plot trial located at three grassland sites within the UK collected between April 2016 and October 2016. The sites were Rothamsted Research at North Wyke in Devon, Bangor University at Henfaes Research Station in North Wales, and Easter Bush in Scotland. At each site measurements were taken from 16 plots, organised within a randomised complete block design: 4 (control) plots did not receive fertilizer, 4 plots received urea only, 4 plots received urea and urea-inhibitors, and 4 plots received ammonium-nitrate (Nitram). Fertiliser was applied three times and three cuts were performed. All parameters were measured following fertiliser application. Samples were taken before fertilizer additions at peak growth and before the last silage cut. Soil physical parameters were: aggregate size distribution, aggregate stability, texture (sand/silt/clay) and soil moisture. Soil chemical parameters were: soil nitrate and ammonium, dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen, amino acids and peptides, soil organic matter content as loss-on-ignition, pH, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, permanganate oxdisable carbon, citric acid extractable phosphorous, Olsen-P and total carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. Soil biological measures were: microbial biomass, carbon and nitrogen. Microbial community composition and nitrogen genes were measured on the same soil samples and are presented in a separate dataset (https://doi.org/10.5285/59f81d41-a789-4c5c-8ab8-36baa7ac2c55) Measurements were undertaken by members of staff from the Centre of Ecology & Hydrology (Bangor, Edinburgh, Lancaster, Wallingford), Bangor University, School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography and Rothamsted Research, Sustainable Agricultural Sciences, North Wyke. Data was collected for the Newton Fund project “UK-China Virtual Joint Centre for Improved Nitrogen Agronomy”. Funded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and NERC - Ref BB/N013468/1 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7a87dde4-b54e-49b0-8751-1d59e8aebb90

  • Data comprises abundance measures of mites, collembola and plant biomass collected from a field experiment based at Sourhope. Experimental plots varied in nitrogen addition treatment and level of ground disturbance. The data were collected as a component of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme, established in 1999 and centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute)'s farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders. During this time, the site was monitored to assess changes in aboveground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b0c85bce-6fe2-4c1e-9750-6f990532eafc

  • We investigated the physical basis of this weakened trapping using pore scale observations of supercritical CO2 in mixed-wet carbonates. The wetting alteration induced by oil provided CO2-wet surfaces that served as conduits to flow. In situ measurements of contact angles showed that CO2 varied from nonwetting to wetting throughout the pore space, with contact angles ranging 25° <θ< 127°; in contrast, an inert gas, N2, was nonwetting with a smaller range of contact angle 24° <θ< 68 °. Observations of trapped ganglia morphology showed that this wettability allowed CO2 to create large, connected, ganglia by inhabiting small pores in mixed-wet rocks. The connected ganglia persisted after three pore volumes of brine injection, facilitating the desaturation that leads to decreased trapping relative to water-wet systems. This data is associated with this open access publication: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2016, 50, 18, 10282-10290. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.6b03111.

  • [This dataset is embargoed until December 13, 2020]. The data consist of nitrogen gene data, soil biodiversity indices and microbial community composition for three soil depths (0-15, 15-30 and 30-60 cm) from a winter wheat field experiment located in the United Kingdom and collected between April 2017 and August 2017. The sites were Rothamsted Research at North Wyke in Devon and Bangor University at Henfaes Research Station in North Wales. At each site measurements were taken from 15 plots, organised within a randomised complete block design where 5 plots did not receive fertilizers (controls), 5 plots received food-based digestate, and 5 plots received acidified food based digestate a nitrification inhibitor. Soil samples were taken within two weeks of digestate application and shortly before winter wheat harvest. Soil chemical parameters were: soil nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen, amino acids and peptides, soil organic matter content as loss-on-ignition, pH, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, permanganate oxdisable carbon citric acid extractable phosphorous, Olsen-P and total carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. Soil biological measure were: microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen. Soil samples were taken by members of staff from Centre of Ecology & Hydrology (Bangor), Bangor University, School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography Sustainable Agricultural Sciences, and Rothamsted Research North Wyke. Measurements were carried out Rothamsted Research Harpenden and the Centre of Ecology & Hydrology (Wallingford). Soil physico-chemical parameters were measured on the same soil samples and are presented in a related dataset. https://catalogue.ceh.ac.uk/id/90df9dfa-a0c8-4ead-a13d-0a0a13cda7ab Data was collected for the Newton Fund project “UK-China Virtual Joint Centre for Improved Nitrogen Agronomy”. Funded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and NERC - Ref BB/N013468/1 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/391c0294-07f1-4856-b592-428bd44055ca

  • The data consists of nitrogen (N) offtake, N emissions and soil N parameters, and herbage quality parameters from a three-cut silage plot trial located at two grassland sites within the UK collected between April and October 2016. The sites were Rothamsted Research at North Wyke in Devon and Bangor University at Henfaes Research Station in North Wales. At each site measurements were taken from 16 plots, organised within a randomised complete block design. Fertiliser was applied three times and three cuts were performed, all parameters measured were following a fertiliser application. Nitrogen parameters measured were crude protein (CP) of herbage, ammonia (NH3) emissions, nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, and soil ammonium (NH4) and nitrate (NO3). Herbage quality parameters measured were dry matter, acid-digestible fibre (ADF), ash, CP, metabolizable energy (ME), and non-digestible fibre (NDF) and digestibility (D) was calculated. Nitrogen offtake, losses and fluxes were measured to determine the N use efficiency and the economic viability of different N fertilisers. Measurements were undertaken by members of staff from Bangor University, School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography and Rothamsted Research, Sustainable Agricultural Sciences – North Wyke. Data was collected for the Newton Fund project "UK-China Virtual Joint Centre for Improved Nitrogen Agronomy". Funded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and NERC - Ref BB/N013468/1 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4c7d4b3c-88f7-43ab-a50f-b6804474e568