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Natural Environment Research Council Designated Data Centres

1106 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 1106
  • The data set comprises of measurements of surface currents collected across the Indian Ocean in the region 50 E (the Gulf of Aden) to 100 E and 25 S to 10 N. The data were collected between 1854 and 1974. The surface currents, measured from ships' drift, have been compiled into 10 day periods and 1 degree latitude-longitude squares. For each of these the vector mean of all of the observations from all years has been calculated. With this amount of subdivision, coverage is often sparse and sometimes non-existent. The source material for this atlas was obtained from the UK Meteorological Office archive of historical surface currents and this data set was compiled by the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences Deacon Laboratory (IOSDL).

  • The LOCATE (Land Ocean CArbon TransfEr) project in the UK consists of measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nutrients, temperature, salinity, alkalinity and sediment in rivers and estuaries combined with a terrestrial model to predict the future evolution of the land ocean carbon flux. LOCATE samples identify the amount of organic carbon, washed from soils, enters the oceans, with emphasis on estuaries and coastal waters. The LOCATE project integrates knowledge and skills across NERC terrestrial, freshwater and marine research centres to transform the UK’s ability to measure, model and predict land-ocean fluxes in a changing environment. LOCATE is a collaboration between the National Oceanography Centre (NOC), the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML). LOCATE is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) from 2016 until 2021. The estuarine and oceanographic data are held by the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC), the river data are held by the Environmental Information Data Centre (EIDC).

  • This dataset comprises Acoustic Wave and Current (AWAC) profiler data collected in the coastal waters of St Vincent, in the Caribbean Sea. The data were collected betewen 26th July 2018 and 10th October 2018 and 15th January 2019 to 20th March 2019 as part fo two deployments. An AWAC profiler was deployed at approximately 10 metres depth in the shallow coastal waters, south of Georgetown, St Vincent. The dataset is part of the Commonwealth Marine Economies Programme which was launched in 2016 to help support the marine economies of commonwealth small island developing states (SIDS).

  • The data set comprises 2193 profiles of turbidity from an area of the Severn Estuary (UK) between the Shoots and Bridgwater Bay between 1974 and 1978. The data were collected as analogue records of continuous vertical profiles on a time series cross-section basis, where possible, over 13.5 hours from a drifting ship. All measurements were collected between 0 m and 39 m depth. The data coverage is derived from 172 stations along 17 survey lines, the density of coverage varying between 1 and 99 records per station. Each analogue record was digitised as approximately 200 pairs of XY coordinates. The X ordinates were then converted to depth (in metres) using a depth calibration and the Y ordinates to parts per million (PPM) of sediment using siltmeter calibration data. The Fluid Mud data bank was designed by the (former) Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) Taunton, UK, and the data were originally stored at IOS on a PDP 11 computer. They were then moved to an Oracle RDBMS at the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) and stored as the Bristol Channel Suspended Sediments Data Bank.

  • The dataset combines fluorescent time-lapse sediment profile imaging (f-SPI) and diffusion gradient thin gels (DGT) to examine, in situ, the link between an important benthic ecosystem process (bioturbation) and ecosystem functioning (trace metal cycling) in Loch Creran, Scotland. The dimensions of the fg-SPI faceplate were 15x21.5cm (=322.50cm2), but after subtraction of the area occupied by the two DGT gels (=74cm2) the field of view reduces to 9x21.5cm (=248.5cm2). The camera (Nikcon D100, 2000 x 3000 pixels = 6 megapixels effective resolution = 75x75um per pixel) was set to an exposure of 1/60 f=2.0 and film speed equivalent to ISO 400. For each time-lapse sequence images were taken every 5 minutes for a period of 96h (n=1152 images per deployment). Three time-lapse movies are presented here to accompany Teal et. al. 2012 Biogeosciences. Data produced by Dr Lorna Teal (Institute for Marine Resources and Ecosystem Studies, IJmuiden), Dr Ruth Parker (Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science), and Dr Martin Solan (National Oceanography Centre, Southampton).

  • The dataset comprises chlorophyll-a concentrations from water samples taken during RRS James Clark Ross cruise JR304, from 15/11/2014 - 17/12/2014. The cruise sailed from Punta Arenas, Chile, returning to Stanley, Falkland Islands. Samples were taken during transit to Signy Island (South Orkneys), and then up through the Scotia Sea to BAS survey sites P2 and P3 as well as near South Georgia and in the Western Core Box survey area to the north of the island of South Georgia. 112 samples were collected from the ship’s uncontaminated underway supply, with an intake at approximately 6 m depth, every two hours during transit periods. 103 samples were collected, using a rosette sampler, from the upper 1000m during CTD (conductivity, temperature and depth probe) deployments. Each 300ml sample was filtered through a 0.8µm pore size, 25mm diameter, MPF300 filter, rinsed with milliQ water, placed in an eppendorf tube and stored at -20°C for later analysis. Samples were extracted in 90 % acetone for 22-24 hours at 4°C and measured on a Trilogy Turner Designs 7200 lab fluorometer calibrated with a pure chlorophyll-a standard (Sigma, UK) and set up following the method of Welschmeyer (1994). Data have not been adjusted for blanks. The data set was from the annual Western Core Box Cruise run by British Antarctic Survey (BAS). Data were collected to support the PhD of Anna Belcher and provide seasonal context for the cruise in terms of the primary production in the surface ocean. Chlorophyll samples were taken by Jenny Thomas (BAS), Gabi Stowasser (BAS), Sophie Fielding(BAS), Vicky Peck (BAS), Jess Gardner (University of East Anglia and BAS), Cecilia Liszka (BAS), Manon Duret (National Oceanography Centre, NOC), Anna Belcher (NOC), Anna Mikis (Cardiff University) , Marianne Wootton (Sir Alistair Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science), Sebastien Floter (GEOMAR Kiel). Chlorophyll samples were analysed aboard the R.R.S. James Clark Ross by Manon Duret and Anna Belcher from NOC.

  • Historical sea level data for the Thames region. These data were originally screened as part of an Environment Agency project on extreme sea level in the Thames estuary. Coryton: 1966-1970, 1973-1974 North Woolwich: 1950, 1955-1963, 1965-1967, 1969-1970, 1973-1974 Southend: 1981-1983 Tilbury: 1931-1945, 1960-1961, 1967, 1970, 1984 Tower Pier: 1928-1942, 1944-1945, 1947-1951, 1954-1955, 1958, 1960-1966, 1973

  • This database, and the accompanying website called ‘SurgeWatch’ (http://surgewatch.stg.rlp.io), provides a systematic UK-wide record of high sea level and coastal flood events over the last 100 years (1915-2014). Derived using records from the National Tide Gauge Network, a dataset of exceedence probabilities from the Environment Agency and meteorological fields from the 20th Century Reanalysis, the database captures information of 96 storm events that generated the highest sea levels around the UK since 1915. For each event, the database contains information about: (1) the storm that generated that event; (2) the sea levels recorded around the UK during the event; and (3) the occurrence and severity of coastal flooding as consequence of the event. The data are presented to be easily assessable and understandable to a wide range of interested parties. The database contains 100 files; four CSV files and 96 PDF files. Two CSV files contain the meteorological and sea level data for each of the 96 events. A third file contains the list of the top 20 largest skew surges at each of the 40 study tide gauge site. In the file containing the sea level and skew surge data, the tide gauge sites are numbered 1 to 40. A fourth accompanying CSV file lists, for reference, the site name and location (longitude and latitude). A description of the parameters in each of the four CSV files is given in the table below. There are also 96 separate PDF files containing the event commentaries. For each event these contain a concise narrative of the meteorological and sea level conditions experienced during the event, and a succinct description of the evidence available in support of coastal flooding, with a brief account of the recorded consequences to people and property. In addition, these contain graphical representation of the storm track and mean sea level pressure and wind fields at the time of maximum high water, the return period and skew surge magnitudes at sites around the UK, and a table of the date and time, offset return period, water level, predicted tide and skew surge for each site where the 1 in 5 year threshold was reached or exceeded for each event. A detailed description of how the database was created is given in Haigh et al. (2015). Coastal flooding caused by extreme sea levels can be devastating, with long-lasting and diverse consequences. The UK has a long history of severe coastal flooding. The recent 2013-14 winter in particular, produced a sequence of some of the worst coastal flooding the UK has experienced in the last 100 years. At present 2.5 million properties and £150 billion of assets are potentially exposed to coastal flooding. Yet despite these concerns, there is no formal, national framework in the UK to record flood severity and consequences and thus benefit an understanding of coastal flooding mechanisms and consequences. Without a systematic record of flood events, assessment of coastal flooding around the UK coast is limited. The database was created at the School of Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton with help from the Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, the National Oceanography Centre and the British Oceanographic Data Centre. Collation of the database and the development of the website was funded through a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) impact acceleration grant. The database contributes to the objectives of UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) consortium project FLOOD Memory (EP/K013513/1).

  • The data set comprises time series of sea level data from coastal tide gauges. The data holdings include over 1000 site years of data from about 200 sites comprising about 10 million records. About 75 per cent of the data are from some 100 sites around the British Isles - the remaining data are from coastal sites and islands scattered across the globe. Data are primarily hourly values. Recording periods vary from one month at some sites to over several years.There are three short series from around the Irish coast which were collected in 1842.

  • A large number of charts (originals and copies) together with tabulations of data are also available, some of which date back to the 1850s. A more detailed description of these will be available once they have been systematically catalogued and archived.