nonCciKeyword

NERC_DDC

1990 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 1990
  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project, Fault seal controls on storage capacity, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 21.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-14.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC (UK Carbon Capture and Storage Research Centre) Call 1 project, Multi-Phase Flow Modelling for Hazardous Assessment, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 21.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-07.

  • 2 papers and supplementary information produced from NERC Grant NE/I006427/1. Lear, C. H., H. K. Coxall, G. L. Foster, D. J. Lunt, E. M. Mawbey, Y. Rosenthal, S. M. Sosdian, E. Thomas, and P. A. Wilson (2015), Neogene ice volume and ocean temperatures: Insights from infaunal foraminiferal Mg/Ca paleothermometry, Paleoceanography, 30, 1437–1454, doi:10.1002/2015PA002833. Elaine M. Mawbey, Caroline H. Lear; Carbon cycle feedbacks during the Oligocene-Miocene transient glaciation. Geology ; 41 (9): 963–966. doi: https://doi.org/10.1130/G34422.1

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC (UK Carbon Capture and Storage Research Centre) Call 1 project, Multi-Phase Flow Modelling for Hazardous Assessment, was presented at the Cambridge Biannual, 02.04.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-07.

  • This data set includes microseismic and structural geological data collected at Aquistore (Canada). They cover a period from 26th April - 21st June 2015, during which CO2 was being injected in the Aquistore injection well at 3.5 km depth. The data were collected in the framework of a research project funded by UKCCSRC (EPSRC) and based at Aquistore in order to identify whether any microseismic events, that could be related to the CO2 injection, took place during this period and use of these events to image potential flowpathways at depth. The data were collected at a sampling rate of 1000Hz using a short-period microseismic array with a 25m aperture, consisting of one three-component and three one-component sensors (Lennartz, MKIII and MKII lite). The array was placed at 50cm depth, approximately 150m away from the injection well. Acquisition was continuous during the above period. The microseismic data are available in PASCAL or ASCII format. Full details on equipment used in data collection and data formats are available in the README file. Due to commercial constraints this dataset is currently under embargo until the end of 2017. Due to the large size of the dataset additional information and access requirements can be requested via the contact email supplied.

  • Data produced from NERC Grant NE/M001156/1 - Fe speciation data (FeHR/FeT, and FePy/FeHR), collected following methods outlined in Izon et al., 2017, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS); % Carbonate, determined gravimetrically; d34SV-CDT for sedimentary pyrite, analysed by Iso-Analytical Laboratories, Cheshire, using standard EA-IRMS techniques; d15N of bulk rock, analysed by nano-EA-IRMS, following methods described in Polissar et al., 2009, Analytical Chemistry; d15N of kerogen extracted following the methods described in Zerkle et al., 2017, Nature, analysed by nano-EA-IRMS; d13C of organic carbon, measured on decarbonated rock powders by standard EA-IRMS techniques; %TN and TON % determined by standard EA-IRMS of bulk rock and extracted kerogen, respectively. Drill core samples were taken through the 2.7Ga old Manjeri Formation of the Belingwe Greenstone belt, Zimbabwe, which overlies more ancient gneissic basement with very well-exposed unconformity (Bickle et al. 1975). The Manjeri Formation, typically 50-150m thick, exhibits a deepening succession of facies (Grassineau et al., 2002, Hunter et al., 1998). It is directly overlain by komatiitic basalts and komatiites of the Reliance Fm., dated at 2692±9 Ma (Pb-Pb whole rock; Chauvel et al., 1993). The metamorphic grade of the Manjeri succession is variable, but generally remarkably low (Abell et al. 1981). Three drill cores were taken in the Manjeri Formation. The NERCMAR drill core has been described in detail by Grassineau et al., 2002. Drill cores A and B were collected some km to the north, in the upper Manjeri Formation.

  • Published Papers: 1) Brown, W.J., Mound, J.E. \& Livermore, P.W., (2013) Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol 223, pp 62-76 Jerks abound: an analysis of geomagnetic observatory data from 1957 to 2008 doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2013.06.001 2) Cox, G.A., Livermore, P.W. & Mound, J.E., (2014) Geophysical Journal International. Vol 196, pp 1311--1329. Forward models of torsional waves: dispersion and geometric effects doi:10.1093/gji/ggt414 3) Hori, K., Jones, C.A. & Teed, R.J. (2015) Geophysical Research Letters, vol 42, pp 6622--6629. Slow magnetic Rossby waves in the Earth's Core. doi:10.1002/2015GL064733 4) Teed, R.J., Jones, C.A. & Tobias, S.M., (2014) Geophysical Journal International, vol 196, pp 724--735. The dynamics and excitation of torsional waves in geodynamo simulations. doi:10.1093/gji/ggt432 5) Teed, R.J., Jones, C.A. & Tobias, S.M., (2015) Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol 419, pp 22-31. The transition to earth-like torsional oscillations in magnetoconvection simulations. Doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2015.02.045

  • The Quaternary deposits summary lithologies dataset is a digital geological map across the bulk of the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS), for areas up to a water depth of 200 m, which groups the deposits into classes based on similar engineering geology characteristics. The map is derived from (unpublished) BGS 1:1,000,000 scale Quaternary digital geological mapping, so is effective at that scale. The map was produced in 2014 in collaboration with, and co-funded by, The Crown Estate as part of a wider commissioned project to assess seabed geological constraints on engineering infrastructure across the UKCS. The data are held by the BGS as an ESRI ArcGIS Shapefile The divisions on the map combine the Quaternary deposits into 7 categories of similar strength and lithological variability, each with a ‘Category’ title that summarises their main lithological character: diamict; firm to hard interbedded (layered); firm to hard mud; sand and gravel; soft interbedded; soft mud; undifferentiated. These categories can be used as a basis for assessing, in conjunction with a range of other geological factors, the geological constraints on engineering structures at or close to the seabed.

  • The Quaternary deposits thickness dataset is a digital geological map across the bulk of the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS), for areas up to a water depth of 200m, which shows the thickness of the deposits over bedrock in three categories: <5m, 5-50m, and >50m Quaternary cover. These depth bands were picked because they represent the horizons that have impact on offshore infrastructure deployment. The map is derived from (unpublished) BGS 1:1000000 scale Quaternary digital geological mapping. The map was produced in 2014 in collaboration with, and co-funded by, The Crown Estate as part of a wider commissioned project to assess seabed geological constraints on engineering infrastructure across the UKCS. The data are held by the BGS as an ESRI ArcGIS Shapefile.

  • The inherent nature of electricity necessitates a permanent balance between generation and demand in electricity systems. This has obvious implications for the operation of CCS power plants in decarbonised electricity systems with inflexible nuclear and variable renewable supply. The low variable costs of nuclear and some intermittent renewable technology allow them to run as base-load generators and shift fossil fuel plants from base-load to midmerit plants. CCS power plants can be expected to increasingly operate in ways to balance variations, sometimes simultaneously, in the production of some intermittent renewable technologies and variations in electricity demand, resulting in more frequent ramping and start/stop cycles. As a result, they may also operate over a wide output range to maintain the quality and security of electricity supply by providing ancillary services, e.g. capacity and energy reserve, to the electricity network. This work characterises the operating envelope, the performance and the corresponding compressed CO2 flow of coal power plants for a range of loads, with or without voluntary by-pass of the capture unit. Optimised part-load operating strategies provide novel insights into the additional capabilities of CCS power plants specifically designed for enhanced operating flexibility. The paper is available at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1876610214026010, DOI: doi:10.1016/j.egypro.2014.11.786.