nonCciKeyword

Iron

13 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 13
  • This collection includes the elastic calculations of the hcp-Fe-Si-S-C alloy system. NERC grant NE/M015181/1 - Pre melting in iron and iron alloys: ab initio calculations and high P-T experiments on iron, iron alloys and other materials

  • The vast majority of palaeomagnetic recordings held in rock and meteorites are contained in small inhomogeneously magnetised particles that have a single-vortex (SV) domain state. The reliability and fidelity of the magnetic recording in these particles can only be determined using a numerical micromagnetic approach. This data set provides the first comprehensive examination of domain state as a function of grain size, grain shape and temperature for both magnetite and iron. The results show that SV domain states are highly stable, and in some cases more stable than their ‘ideal’ uniformly magnetized counterparts. With the data sets in this archive it is possible to determine the magnetic recording and stability characteristics of assemblies of grains that can be matched to a wide variety of grain distributions found in terrestrial rocks and meteorites.

  • This national digital GIS product produced by the British Geological Survey indicates the susceptibility of corroded underground ferrous (iron) assets (e.g. pipes) to failure, as a result of ground instability. It is largely derived from the digital geological map and expert knowledge. The GIS dataset contains eight fields. The first field is a summary map that gives an overview of where corroded ferrous assets may fail. The other seven fields indicate the properties of the ground with respect to corrosivity and hazards associated with soluble rocks, landslides, compressible ground, collapsible ground, swelling clays and running sands. The data is useful to asset managers in water companies, local authorities and utility companies who would like to understand where underground ferrous assets are susceptible to failure as a result of ground conditions.

  • This national digital GIS product produced by the British Geological Survey indicates the potential for leakage to have a negative effect on ground stability. It is largely derived from the digital geological map and expert knowledge. The GIS dataset contains seven fields. The first field is a summary map that gives an overview of where leakage may affect ground stability. The other six fields indicate the properties of the ground with respect to the extent to which hazards associated with soluble rocks, landslides, compressible ground, collapsible ground, swelling clays and running sands will be increased due to leakage. The data is useful to asset managers in water companies, local authorities and utility companies who would like to understand where. and to what extent, leaking underground pipes or other structures may initate or worsen ground stability.

  • The dataset is a Soil Corrosivity Map for the U.K. based on the BGS DIGMapGB-PLUS Map. The creation of this dataset involves scoring the Soil Parent Material types for five different attributes that contribute towards the corrosion of underground assets. These are (i) high or low soil pH, (ii) general soil moisture, (iii) the likelihood that soil saturated and undergo periods of anaerobic conditions, (iv) the presence of sulphides and sulphates and (v) the resistivity of the soil parent material. The scoring of each of these parameters was undertaken based on the Cast Iron Pipe Association (CIPA) (now the Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association, DIPRA) rating system. By combining the scores of each parameter a GIS layer has been created that identifies those areas that may provide a corrosive environment to underground cast iron assets. The final map has been classified into three categories signifying: 'GROUND CONDITIONS BENEATH TOPSOIL ARE UNLIKELY TO CAUSE CORROSION OF IRON', 'GROUND CONDITIONS BENEATH TOPSOIL MAY CAUSE CORROSION TO IRON', 'GROUND CONDITIONS BENEATH TOPSOIL ARE LIKELY TO CAUSE CORROSION TO IRON'. The dataset is designed to aid engineers and planners in the management of and maintenance of underground ferrous assets.

  • These data are (1) porewater extractions of cores of the permafrost and active layer of Adventdalen, Svalbard, (2) solid-phase extractions of the same cores, and (3) in-situ porewater sampling from the end of the summer, 2017. The aqueous parameters are: major ions (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-), Fe(aq), Mn(aq), aqueous CH4 and CO2 concentrations, delta 13C- CH4, acetate, propionic acid, isobutyric acid, butyric acid, isovaleric acid, valeric acid, isocaproic acid, caproic acid, heptanoic acid, pH, oxidation-reduction potential, dissolved oxygen and alkalinity. The solid parameters are: organic carbon, nitrogen, acid volatile sulphur (AVS), chromium-reducible sulphur (CRS), amorphous and nanoparticulate iron (oxyhydr)oxides, crystalline iron (oxyhydr)oxides, iron bound in carbonates, and magnetite. Funding was provided by the NERC grant NE/M019829/1.

  • The data set contains grain size distributions, organic matter (OM) contents and trace metals distribution metal distribution (Fe, Zn, Cu, Cr and Pb) of seven (7) shallow cores of sediments from the Notwane Dam (southern Botswana). The cores have been collected with a push corer using PVC pipes of 5 cm diameter by a team from BIUST led by Dr. Franchi between November 2017 and February 2018. The data were collected as part of the PULA project, which aimed at understanding the immediate effect of heavy rainfall and floods on water resources in arid Botswana and their transitional hydrologic readjustment towards the dry period, and the role of these events in supporting either or both resources replenishment and contamination. Grain size profiles of the cores have been obtained by analyzing wet sediments with a laser diffraction particle size analyzer. The OM content of the sediments was obtained by measuring the loss on ignition (LOI) of bulk sediments after calcination in a muffle furnace. The sediments have been analyzed for trace metal distribution using a Microwave Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometer (MP-AES). The grain size distribution has allowed to pinpoint the presence of flood couplets, characterized by coarse lags followed by fine grained materials. The trace metal distribution profiles have been compared with the flood couplets to assess the entity of metal mobilization during floods and subsequent droughts. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/022b3fff-55d7-46f5-b11f-2f7366e508b0

  • This dataset represents the first publication of complete national maps from the Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) and TellusNI projects, whose aim was to conduct a national geochemical survey of the United Kingdom in order to improve understanding of our geology and environment and provide quantitative evidence against which to gauge future environmental change. This dataset consists of a series of interpolated raster (ASCII grid) maps displaying the concentrations of a suite of chemical elements (and oxides) in the stream sediments of the United Kingdom. The chemical elements are as follows: Arsenic, Barium, Calcium (CaO), Chromium, Cobalt, Copper, Iron (Fe2O3), Lanthanum, Lead, Magnesium (MgO), Manganese (MnO), Nickel, Potassium (K2O), Rubidium, Uranium, Vanadium, Zinc and Zirconium.

  • The London Earth data is part of a nationwide project to determine the distribution of chemical elements in the surface environment, namely Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE). London Earth focuses on the soil of the capital city, the limits of the survey being defined by the Greater London Authority (GLA) administrative boundary. Chemical elements have been determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS) at the laboratories of the British Geological Survey (BGS) in Keyworth, Nottingham. These results are presented as a MS Excel file.

  • The dataset contains concentrations of Total Organic Carbon, Chloride, Fluoride, Bromine, Sulfate, Potassium, Aluminium, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Sodium, Phosphorus, Chromium, Manganese, Cobalt, Nickel, Copper, Zinc, Arsenic, Selenium, Molybdenum, Cadmium, Lead and stable water isotopes (δD and δ18O) for 25 groundwater and surface water sampling locations, surveyed over the period February 2017 to May 2018 immediately following Dineo floods. The data were collected as part of the PULA project, which aimed at understanding the immediate effect of heavy rainfall and floods on water resources in arid Botswana and their transitional hydrologic readjustment towards the dry period, and the role of these events in supporting either or both resources replenishment and contamination. The project was co-ordinated by the University of Aberdeen, with partners at the Botswana International University of Science and Technology, the Government of Botswana Department of Water Affairs, and the International Water Management Institute. The project was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council as part of its Urgency grants scheme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c7793128-1961-45d5-aa18-5f023116784b