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  • This dataset details the germination rates of seeds from Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays were introduced across the study site, Arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100ha replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). After 16 days plants were collected in and stored under glasshouse conditions. Upon fruit maturation, 20 seeds from each of the 48 field exposed plants was sown into compost and the number which successfully germinated was counted. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f9dd7a39-f408-4e11-8819-46afa05457bd

  • This dataset details the number of seeds produced by pollinator exposed and supplemented Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays were introduced across the study site. Arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100ha replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). After 16 days plants were collected in and one flower from each plant was supplemented with outcrossed pollen. Upon fruit maturation the mean number of seeds counted from pollinator exposed fruit were then compared to the number of seeds from supplemented fruit to determine the degree of pollen limitation in relation to habitat context. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8caf2d8a-564d-4f2e-a797-174165a83796

  • This dataset contains seed counts of Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to form experimental arrays within habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100 hectare replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). On each plant, the seed set was measured for flowers which were exposed and excluded from pollinators to determine the effects of habitat context on plant reproduction. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5b400b69-b828-45e8-b04e-7ccbfdb0987f

  • This dataset details the paternity of progeny from Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Plants were genotyped at seven microsatellite markers before being introduced across the study site to form experimental arrays. Experimental arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100 hectare replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). Upon maturation approximately 10 seeds were collected from each plant and genotyped. Fragment analysis was conducted and alleles were scored on Genemarker. Seeds were then manually scored as outcrossed or selfed and paternity was determined using Cervus. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7b721c07-bc38-4815-8669-4675867663d0

  • This dataset contains yield data for wheat, oilseed rape and field beans grown in fields under different agri-environment practices. The fields were located at the Hillesden Estate in Buckinghamshire, UK, where a randomised block experiment had been implemented to examine the effects of converting differing proportions of arable land to wildlife habitat. The fields were planted with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) followed by break crops of either oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) or field beans (Vicia faba L.). Three treatments were applied at random: a control ("business as usual"), Entry Level Stewardship (ELS) treatment and ELS Extra treatment. The ELS treatment involved removing 1% of land to create wildlife habitats. The ELS Extra had a greater proportion of land removed (6%) and additional wildlife habitats included. The total yield of each crop was measured at the time of harvesting using a yield meter attached to the combine harvester. From these values, yield per hectare and the ratio of crop yield to regional average yield were calculated. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e54069b6-71a9-4b36-837f-a5e3ee65b4de