nonCciKeyword

Geology

1463 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 1463
  • Direct geological observations made during field work, tied to positional information collected by hand-held GPS.

  • The Land Survey Archives consists of records of the Geological Survey in Scotland for permanent retention dating from 1860s onwards. The collection comprises geologists' field notebooks, miscellaneous field observations and reports, historical and biographical material, correspondence files, photographs, etc. Includes archival material deposited by outside individuals and organisations, eg. NCB (National Coal Board) Bore Book Collection. Survey archival material for Northern England will be incorporated. Some 380 accessions held amounting to over 7,000 items. Indexed at collection level in Land Survey Record Index (LSRI). Plans abstracted and held separately in Land Survey Plans Collection.

  • The BGS Rock Classification Scheme (RCS) is a comprehensive classification scheme for all types of rocks and unconsolidated sediments worldwide. It is intended to be used for classification of single rock samples and can be used without any knowledge of field relationships. It has been designed for use by people with a wide range of geological knowledge; from experienced professional geologists to technicians and drillers. It also allows names to be assigned according to the level of information about the sample. The system if hierarchical, ranging from very simple names such as igneous rock to highly detailed names such as mugearite, that can only be applied after chemical analysis. Rock names can consist of a root name e.g. granite and several qualifiers that impart more information e.g. grey-biotite-bearing granite. The classification scheme has been implemented as a hierarchical dictionary of codes for all rock types. The classification scheme is described in BGS Research Reports 99-02, 99-03, 99-06. The BGS Rock Classification Scheme was devised between 1993 and 1996 in response to a need from the Digital Map Production System project.

  • Scanned images of the records of onshore Great Britain (or near shore) site investigation reports held in the BGS archives in paper, microfilm or digital format. The entire collections in BGS Edinburgh have been scanned, but in BGS Keyworth currently only new reports received since 2002. Scanning started in 2002 and is ongoing with new records being scanned and added to the collection. Images are stored in TIFF format (Tagged Image File Format). Indexed on the site investigation database and the boreholes within the report, and their images, are associated via the borehole database.

  • This service provides an Atom feed of datasets that are available for download.

  • In 2011 the British Geological Survey (BGS) decided to begin the assembly of a National Geological Model (NGM) from its existing and on-going geological framework models , comprising integrated national crustal, bedrock and Quaternary models. The bedrock component is the most advanced of these themes and comprises both the calculated models and a complementary network of cross-sections that provide a fence diagram for the bedrock geology of Great Britain. This fence diagram, the GB3D_v2014 dataset is available in a variety of formats from the BGS website www.bgs.ac.uk as free downloads, it supercedes the earlier 2012 version. The model complements the existing 1:625 000 scale mapsheets published by BGS utilising the same colour schema and geological classification. The component cross-sections extend to depths between 1.5 and 6 km; they have an aggregate length of over 25,000 km, and they are snapped together at their intersections to ensure total consistency. The sections are based on the existing BGS geological framework models where they cut through them together and incorporate around 300 deep stratigraphic boreholes across England and Wales. The sections also take account of the vast wealth of published data on the subsurface structure of Britain both from BGS and in the scientific literature. Much of this is in the form of cross-sections, contour maps of surfaces, and thicknesses (isopachs). The fence diagram has been built in the Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3D (GSI3D) software. It is envisaged that this dataset will form a useful educational resource for geoscience students and the general public, and also provide the bedrock geology context and structure for regional and catchment scale studies. The fence diagram has been built in stages between 2009-14 using funding from the BGS National Capability Programme the Environment Agency of England and Wales, and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. Some 16 expert regional geologists compiled the sections.

  • Records of all onshore (or near shore) boreholes, trial pits, shafts and wells held in the BGS archives in either paper, microfilm or digital format. The records range from simple single page lithological logs through to hydrocarbon completion reports. Spatial coverage will vary considerably depending on drilling activity, collecting activity and donations. The majority of new data is from site investigation reports with concentrations in urban areas and along transport routes. Current collection over 1million records covering the whole of Great Britain with 50,000 new records added per annum. Some records date back to 1600 but the majority date from 1900 onwards. Copies of records are available in hard copy or digital formats subject to confidentiality.

  • A collection of reference drawings relating to investigations carried out by Nirex, during the period from 1989 to 1997. The drawings summarise the status of the geological investigation at Sellafield and include borehole locations, geology (surface, structure, sections etc) and geophysics (seismic, airborne, etc). Sites near Sellafield, in Cumbria, and Dounreay, in Caithness. The Nirex (Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive) geological archive was transferred to the British Geological Survey during 2000/2001. The BGS has undertaken to retain the records for a minimum of 50 years as part of its national geological archive. The ownership of Nirex was transferred from the nuclear industry to the UK Government departments DEFRA and DTI in April 2005, and then to the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) in November 2006.

  • The joint PHE-GSNI-BGS digital Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Northern Ireland. The Radon Potential map for Northern Ireland shows the estimated percentage of homes in an area exceeding the radon Action Level. This is the basic information to assigning the level of protection required for new buildings and extensions, as described in the Building Research Establishment guidance BR-413 Radon: Guidance on protective measures for new dwellings in Northern Ireland (2004). The Radon Potential map for Northern Ireland is based on PHE indoor radon measurements and 1:10 000 or 1: 250 000 scale digital geology information provided by the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland (GSNI). The indoor radon data is used with the agreement of the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and PHE. Confidentiality of measurement locations is maintained through data management practices. Access to the data is restricted. Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. Public Health England (PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average exceed 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3), the Action Level. PHE defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration at or above the Action Level. Further information on radon can be obtained from www.ukradon.org

  • Scanned images of the records of all onshore Great Britain (or near shore) boreholes, trial pits, shafts and wells held in the BGS archives in either paper, microfilm or digital format. The records range from simple single page lithological logs through to hydrocarbon completion reports. Current collection over 1million records with 50,000 new records added per annum. Scanning started in 2002 and is ongoing with new records being scanned and added to the collection.