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  • This dataset details the germination rates of seeds from Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays were introduced across the study site, Arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100ha replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). After 16 days plants were collected in and stored under glasshouse conditions. Upon fruit maturation, 20 seeds from each of the 48 field exposed plants was sown into compost and the number which successfully germinated was counted. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f9dd7a39-f408-4e11-8819-46afa05457bd

  • This dataset details the number of seeds produced by pollinator exposed and supplemented Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays were introduced across the study site. Arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100ha replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). After 16 days plants were collected in and one flower from each plant was supplemented with outcrossed pollen. Upon fruit maturation the mean number of seeds counted from pollinator exposed fruit were then compared to the number of seeds from supplemented fruit to determine the degree of pollen limitation in relation to habitat context. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8caf2d8a-564d-4f2e-a797-174165a83796

  • This dataset contains measures of fitness traits from Eschscholzia californica progeny which were experimentally supplemented with selfed or outcrossed pollen to determine the effects of self-fertilisation on a plant which has a low propensity to self. A glasshouse experiment was conducted using 40 plants. On each plant two flowers were emasculated and the first supplemented with outcrossed pollen and the second with self-pollen. From each supplemented plant, a seed was sowed from the outcrossed fruit and from the selfed fruit. The following fitness traits were recorded; the germination rate, the duration from germination to reproductive maturity (time of first flower), together with the height (cm) and biomass (number of flowers and buds) at reproductive maturity. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/551756fd-77ea-479f-8bc9-f0437c6aead6

  • This dataset contains a list of pollinator species caught within pan traps from habitats comprising different floral cover. Data were collected from the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire in June 2015. Surveys were conducted alongside four experimental arrays of the Californian poppy, Eschscholzia californica, located with two habitats; a sown wildflower mix and bare, fallow ground. This set-up was repeated over four 100ha blocks separated at a distance greater than 500m. Pan traps comprised three water-filled circular plastic bowls (80 x 200 mm) painted with non-toxic fluorescent paint (1 yellow, 1 blue and 1 white; UV Gear, UK) placed in the centre of each array. Traps were deployed for 24 hours at each of the 16 arrays on the same day, twice weekly over the 16 day study period (totalling four surveys). Each survey was done in randomised order, between 0930 and 1700. All insects from the main pollinator groups (Hymenoptera: Apoidea, Diptera: Syrphidae and Lepidoptera) were counted and identified to species level. The intertegular span (the distance between the wing bases) of each insect from the main pollinator groups was then measured using digital callipers. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/01906784-6742-44bf-b244-a4b63bed8d82

  • This dataset contains seed counts of Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to form experimental arrays within habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100 hectare replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). On each plant, the seed set was measured for flowers which were exposed and excluded from pollinators to determine the effects of habitat context on plant reproduction. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5b400b69-b828-45e8-b04e-7ccbfdb0987f

  • This dataset details the paternity of progeny from Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Plants were genotyped at seven microsatellite markers before being introduced across the study site to form experimental arrays. Experimental arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100 hectare replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). Upon maturation approximately 10 seeds were collected from each plant and genotyped. Fragment analysis was conducted and alleles were scored on Genemarker. Seeds were then manually scored as outcrossed or selfed and paternity was determined using Cervus. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7b721c07-bc38-4815-8669-4675867663d0