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Environmental monitoring facilities

25 record(s)

 

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  • Seismic reflection data acquired in the region of subglacial Lake Ellsworth. Recording instrument: Geometrics Geode, 48 channels, active source (explosives). Five single-fold lines. Line length between 7.7 and 2.5 km. In addition, fold increased to 4 for the central part of one line (over the lake itself). Dataset also includes data from a single shallow seismic refraction experiment.

  • The British Antarctic Survey holds magnetic data measuring the plasmaspheric mass loading on magnetic field lines in Antarctica. The network of Low Power Magnetometer (LPM) instruments consists of permanent and temporary sites. The data is collected in 3 D fluxgate at up to 1 second and 1 nT resolution. Samples are taken once a second for 150 milliseconds at maximum power. This decreases to once a minute if power is low over the winter. Time and position is measured using an attached GPS system.

  • Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) data acquired during the RABID project in the 2004-2005 field season. A Mala RAMAC GPR system was used, with 200, 100 and 50 MHz unshielded antennas. The 100 MHz antennas could be used in cross-polarised and both in-line and cross-line configuration in a single survey, via a multiplexer. GPR profiles were acquired over all the seismic reflection lines, ~40km upstream from the grounding line of Rutford Ice Stream. The Tyree04 line was orientated across the ice stream, Mogensen, Tolly and Rabid were in line with the ice flow. In addition, the cross-stream line was extended 3.6 km towards the mountains and 3.6 km towards Fletcher Promontory. The RABID project employed hot-water drilling techniques, down-hole instrumentation, as well as surface geophysical measurements, to form an integrated programme studying ice dynamics, basal conditions, climate and glacial history. Funding was provided by the UK NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI).

  • Sections of ice core acquired from upper 100 m of the Rutford Ice Stream during the RABID project. Sections of ice core, up to 4m long and 95mm diameter, were drilled and retrieved using the hot-water ice-corer. The cores were taken from specific depths above, below or straddling the radar reflecting layers in two adjacent holes. A total of 6 cores were collected, with a total of 21.04m of ice. The cores were logged, cut into 55cm sections, sealed in lay-flat plastic tubing, packed in foam and placed in insulated core boxes. The ice was returned to the UK and will be analysed for physical and dielectric properties. The RABID project employed hot-water drilling techniques, down-hole instrumentation, as well as surface geophysical measurements, to form an integrated programme studying ice dynamics, basal conditions, climate and glacial history. Funding was provided by the UK NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI).

  • Long-term, continuous recording of VLF (Very Low Frequency) radio noise characteristics at Halley Station, collected under the aims of the VELOX experiment (VLF/ELF Data Logger Experiment). Data captured includes amplitude, polarisation, azimuth arrival bearing, maximum/minimum over ten frequency bands (8 wide, 2 narrow) from 300 Hz to 10 kHz at a 1 s time resolution. ELF/VLF measurements have been made in various forms at Halley since 1967. VELOX data are compatible with those from earlier loggers at Halley. For a full data description of BAS VLF/ELF data holdings, see BAS VLF/ELF/ULF Data Manual.

  • Dataset comprises approximately 1MB of ice temperature data acquired during the RABID project on Rutford Ice Stream. Data was collected between November 2004 and February 2006, using a thermistor string. The thermistor cable had ten 3K3A Betatherm thermistors located at depths between 15m and 300m below the surface, at approximately 31.5m intervals. The thermistors were calibrated prior to the field work in stable air temperatures at -28 degrees Celsius and +19 degrees Celsius and in an ice point bath. The RABID project employed hot-water drilling techniques, down-hole instrumentation, as well as surface geophysical measurements, to form an integrated programme studying ice dynamics, basal conditions, climate and glacial history. Funding was provided by the UK NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI).

  • Digital seismic reflection data collected during the RABID project in the 2004-2005 field season, using a BISON 9024 seismograph. The seismic survey was carried out ~40km upstream from the grounding line of Rutford Ice Stream, and repeated relevant sections of a 1991 and 1997 survey. Data was collected using 24 channels arranged at 10m spacing. The survey geometry produced four single fold lines with 5 m reflection-point spacing at the bed. The first seismic line (Tyree04 Line) was orientated across the ice stream, the other three (Mogensen Line, Tolly Line and Rabid Line) were in line with the ice flow and intersected the first line at different locations. The RABID project employed hot-water drilling techniques, down-hole instrumentation, as well as surface geophysical measurements, to form an integrated programme studying ice dynamics, basal conditions, climate and glacial history. Funding was provided by the UK NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI).

  • Geographical Positioning System (GPS) data recorded in the region of subglacial Lake Ellsworth. Recording instruments: Leica geodetic receivers. Four locations with continuous data records; all other locations (~70) occupied for short periods (mostly <1 hour).

  • The sampling programme was carried out successfully using kites and helium balloon assisted kites to sample in both low and higher winds speeds. Air samples were successfully processed using the Ice Nucleus chamber for a variety of wind directions representing a range of air mass trajectories and source regions. The aim was to sample air that had passed over land (the Peninsula), sea (Bellingshausen and Weddell) or ice (the plateau) and compare the size and quantity of ice crystals transported. Air filters and ice crystal replication slides have been returned to the laboratory for analysis.

  • Data was collected via Automatic Weather Station (AWS), an ADAS tether sonde system, some radiosondes, a sensor and logger attached to the ice-crystal replicator system and an Ice Nucleus chamber. The collection was made during a month-long period in January and February, 2002, at a site east of Weatherheaven.The data are documented with a detailed diary, a summary of weather observation and a summary of data collection dates and hours.