nonCciKeyword

Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA)

7 record(s)

 

Type of resources

Keywords

Topics

Contact for the resource

Provided by

Years

Formats

Representation types

Update frequencies

Resolution

Regions

GEMET keywords

From 1 - 7 / 7
  • Data comprise wood specific gravity (WSG) and density at 12% moisture content (D12) in wood cores sampled from trees in the Ankeniheny Zahamena forest corridor, the remains of the evergreen forest of eastern Madagascar. The data also include date of sample collection, zone identifier, core identifier, local and scientific tree name, tree height and diameter. Samples were analysed by UFR Sciences du bois de l'ESSA-forêts, Université d'Antananarivo. Data were collected as part of a project funded under the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme. Work package 4, P4GES project, grant references: NE/K008692/1, NE/K010115/1, and NE/K010220/1. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/efa10c00-d43a-4c94-b2f9-0708755e7d80

  • These data include results from serological analysis carried out on serum collected from randomly recruited subjects, merged with household and subject level data about the subjects. The subject and household data collected included occupation of the household head, size of the household, and occupation, gender and age of the subject. Samples were collected from 303 people based in irrigated areas, 728 people from pastoral areas and 81 people from riverine areas along River Tana in Tana River and Garissa counties, Kenya. Field surveys were implemented in December 2013 to February 2014 and laboratory analyses were completed in June 2015. Serum samples were harvested from blood samples obtained from randomly recruited subjects and screened for anti-RVF virus immunoglobulin G using inhibition ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) immunoassay. The household and subject metadata was collected using Open Data Kit (ODK) (https://opendatakit.org) loaded into smart phones. The aim of the project was to determine the risk of Rift Valley Fever virus exposure in people living in areas with different land use and socio-ecological settings. The data were collected by experienced researchers from the International Livestock Research Institute (Kenya), the Department of Disease Surveillance and Response, Kenyatta National Hospital This dataset is part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC). The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J001570/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Additional funding was provided by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) Research Program Agriculture for Nutrition and Health. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8a668a4f-3526-4443-9e77-cea67f04ca19

  • These data comprise apparent densities, species and sex and of mosquitos collected in irrigated and non-irrigated areas in Bura, Tana River County Kenya, between September 2013 and November 2014. Sampling was repeated four times over the period to cover the wet season, dry season, irrigation season and fallow periods. Mosquitoes were trapped using carbon dioxide-baited (CDC) light traps. Mosquitoes harvested from each of these traps were immobilized using 99.5% triethyleamine (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, Missouri) and transferred to distinct bar-coded centrifuge tubes or cryogenic vials. The samples were transported in liquid nitrogen to the entomology section of Arbovirus/Viral haemorrhagic fever (VHF) laboratory at the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) where they were sorted by species, sex, village, collection date and counted. The study was implemented to assess the impact of land use change (specifically the conversion of pastoral rangeland into crop land) on the suitability of the habitats to mosquito development and colonization. It also aimed to identify relative abundance of mosquitoes associated with Rift Valley fever virus transmission. The data were collected and analysed by experienced researchers from the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (Kenya), the International Livestock Research Institute (Kenya) and the Kenya Medical Research Institute. This dataset is part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC). The research was funded by NERC project no NE-J001570-1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Additional funding was provided by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) Program Agriculture for Nutrition and Health. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/813f99c4-d07a-42dc-993a-1c35df9f028e

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. Data comprise wood specific gravity (WSG) and density at 12% moisture content (D12) in wood cores sampled from trees in the Ankeniheny Zahamena forest corridor, the remains of the evergreen forest of eastern Madagascar. The data also include date of sample collection, zone identifier, core identifier, local and scientific tree name, tree height and diameter. Samples were analysed by UFR Sciences du bois de l'ESSA-forêts, Université d'Antananarivo. Data were collected as part of a project funded under the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme. Work package 4, P4GES project Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5e9fe20b-8d00-4bd3-99cb-7989fa781348

  • The data comprises of two datasets. The first consists of text files of anonymised transcripts from focus group discussions (FGDs) on livelihood activities, ecosystem services and the prevalent human and animal health problems in irrigated and non-irrigated areas in northeastern Kenya. The second comprises of scores from proportional piling exercises which showed the distribution of wealth categories and livestock species kept. The study was conducted between August and October, 2013 and the data were collected as open-ended meeting notes and audio clips captured using digital recorders. Written/thumb print consent was always obtained from each individual in the group. All the discussions were also recorded, with the participant's permission. Thirteen FGDs were held in the irrigated areas in Bura and Hola, Tana River County involving farmers who grew a variety of crops for subsistence and commercial purposes. The others were held in Ijara and Sangailu, Garissa County inhabited by transhumance pastoralists. Each group comprised of 10 to 12 people and the discussions were guided by a check list. The transcribed documents were formatted in Microsoft Word (2013) and saved as text files in preparation for analysis. The aim of the study was to collate perceptions of land use change and their effects on ecosystem services. The data were collected by enumerators trained by experienced researchers from the University of Nairobi and the International Livestock Research Institute (Kenya). This dataset is part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC). The research was funded by NERC project NE-J001570-1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Additional funding was provided by the CGIAR Research Program Agriculture for Nutrition and Health. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4f569d73-30c5-4b12-bca7-8901fb567594

  • These data provide results from serological analysis carried out on serum collected from cattle (sample number = 460), goats (sample number = 949) and sheep (Sample number = 574) combined with data collected at the household and subject/animal levels at the time of serum sampling. The data collected at the household and subject/animal levels were: the total number of livestock owned by a household, altitude, geographical coordinates of the sampling sites; and breed, age, sex and body condition score of an animal. The research was carried out in irrigated and non-irrigated areas in Tana River County, Kenya. Field surveys were implemented in August to November 2013 and laboratory analyses were completed in June 2015. Serum samples were harvested from blood samples obtained from animals and screened for anti-Rift Valley Fever (RVF) virus immunoglobulin G using inhibition (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) ELISA immunoassay. The household data was collected using Open Data Kit (ODK) loaded into smart phones. The serological analysis was performed to determine the risk of Rift Valley Fever virus exposure in cattle, sheep and goats. The aim of the survey was to investigate whether land use change, specifically the conversion of rangeland into cropland, affected RVF exposure pattern in livestock. The data were collected by experienced researchers from the Ministry of Livestock Development Nairobi, Kenya and the International Livestock Research Institute (Kenya). This dataset is part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC). The research was funded by NERC project no NE-J001570-1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Additional funding was provided by Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) Research Program Agriculture for Nutrition and Health led by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b9756c4c-9894-4147-a260-a79067604a06

  • The dataset describes the results of a laboratory analysis investigating the presence of various infectious agents in goats, cattle, pigs, dogs and sheep from Mambwe District, Eastern Province, Zambia. Blood samples were collected in June, July and August 2013 and stored on Whatman FTA (Flinders Technology Associates) cards. Laboratory analysis was conducted using polymerase chain reactions (PCR) for African trypanosomes and tick-borne infections. In addition, serum was tested for Brucella using the Rose Bengal test. Cattle and dogs were tested for African trypanosomes, tick-borne infections and Brucella. Goats and sheep were tested for African trypanosomes and Brucella. Pigs were tested for African trypanosomes only. The objective was to evaluate the health status of domestic animals in the Mambwe District. This work was conducted alongside a human wellbeing questionnaire survey. The research was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC). The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f81ede76-a1d4-4367-aa8c-de087350457e